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Archives for August 3, 2016

Intelligent garden design for anywhere – By Lynette L. Walther …

Every once in a while I encounter something new, something so clever and useful that I have to share it with you. This time it is a line of “fabric” pots that includes several sizes, even a raised bed that goes up in seconds and a composter for convenient composting.

Inexpensive and so versatile, the Smart Pots are simply revolutionary and one of the coolest things to come along for gardening in quite some time. The lightweight “pots” can be used just about anywhere to grow vegetables, herbs or flowers. Not only that, the “fabric areation” construction of the unique containers allows plants to air-prune roots, which is reported to produce larger, more productive plants. Even rooftop or balcony gardens are possible to allow anyone to grow things in limited areas in these feather-light sturdy pots.

Container vegetable gardens are among the easiest ways to grow fresh food, and these handy pots make it easier and better than ever.

The pots come in black or a natural color, and are available in a variety of sizes from three to 20 gallons. The raised bed Big Bag Bed warms up quickly in the spring and comes in sizes from 15 gallons (2.1 cubic feet of soil) to a whopping 100 gallons (13.7 cubic feet of soil). Imagine being able to simply unfold a raised bed, fill with soil and plant. No framework needed, no difficult construction or support materials required. The raised bed Big Bag Bed, like the other Smart Pots, can be emptied, rinsed and simply folded for compact storage when not in use.

And there is one more Smart Pot product that I know folks will love. It’s the Compost Sak. Imagine a composter that simply unfolds for use, again no structures to build or maintain. This affordable composter has a capacity of more than 100 gallons (12 cubic feet).

“The Smart Pot and Compost Sak are made from the same material, an inert geotextile fabric. They are BPA-free,” said Karen Murphy for High Caliper Growing, which produces the innovative containers. “The fabric is very durable and will stand up on their own, once you start filling soil. The fabric isn’t flimsy by any means.

“The Compost Sak, since it’s so tall, it will take time for you to fill it up and the sides will want to fold down,” Murphy said. “However, we encourage to keep the Compost Sak closed on top to avoid rodents getting in. You can simply place a large rock or brick on the top to keep it closed. The fabric itself is durable enough that rodents shouldn’t be able to chew their way through.”

I plan to use the Smart Pots to start and grow my dahlias. In the spring the dahlia tubers will be started in potting soil in Smart Pots. Once they have sprouted and the soil has warmed up outdoors, the Smart Pots with their contents will be sunk into the garden. At the end of the growing season when the foliage has died down, I will just lift the Smart Pots, trim away spent foliage and store the entire pot and its contents in a cool, dry and dark space like a cellar. The three-gallon Smart Pots with handles are easy to pull out in the fall. Pots will be ready for sprouting the following spring for another season of blooms.

Or if there is a particular plant I want to grow in a location where I’d like to contain its spread, I’ll just put it in a Smart Pot and sink that into the ground. I bet you can come up with a number of uses for these unique growing containers.

One more thing, the Smart Pots are made in the U.S., a minor fact, but an important one for those who prefer to buy American-made products. Want to see the various Smart Pots avalialbe? Visit the website at SmartPots.com, where you can learn more about them, as well as where to find them for sale locally.

Timely tip No. 1: Oh deer! Are those graceful garden visitors or other animals eating your plants? Take a tip from Old House Garden Heirloom Bulbs and use just a dab of Vicks VapoRub. All it takes is a tiny “touch” of the stuff to deter deer, and it is best applied with a light touch to the smallest sprouts or buds. The petroleum jelly base will ensure that your deterent stays in place for quite a while.

Timely tip No. 2: This is the perfect time to give your plants a pick-me-up with something new that is actually quite old. An organic, plant-based way to super-charge trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and vegetable plants, too, is based on a 400-year-old formula. Invented in Japan, HB-101 is a combination of extracts from Japanese cedar, pine, Japanese cypress and plantain grass. Just a few drops mixed in a gallon of water to spray on assists plants and microbes to work together for healthier, more productive plants. To learn more about HB-101 or where to buy it, look online at: hb-101usa.com.

Article source: http://waldo.villagesoup.com/p/intelligent-garden-design-for-anywhere/1550386

Meet the 2016 Hamptons Showhouse Team

Designer Meg Braff
megbraff.com
“Color was on my mind from the very beginning—with the right combinations, it’s a fantastic tool for making a house feel special,” says the New York–based designer and member of the Coastal Living Designer Network. Braff has an antiques store in Locust Valley, New York, and in 2011 launched her own wallpaper line; 10 of her bright prints are featured in this year’s Showhouse.

Builders Anthony Balducci Dave Bennett
“We wanted to take a modern approach to building a traditional Hamptons-style house,” says Bennett. The team opted for streamlined interior trim, simple Shaker-style cabinets, and a galvanized silver metal roof along the front. Balducci is a Long Island native who started his career in interior design, and Bennett has spent 20 years as a general contractor. Their company, Touch of Grey, is based in Hampton Bays, New York.

Architect Fred Throo
fredthrooarchitect.com
“Shingle-style architecture emerged as a rebuttal of the more exacting Victorian formality. The lines are more relaxed, which is a welcome idea out here in the Hamptons,” says  Throo, who has been designing homes on Long Island for more than 25 years. He worked closely with Balducci and Bennett on this house as they aimed to “get a roomy, five- bedroom house onto a very narrow wooded lot,” he says.

Landscape Designer Calais Ongania
mahoneyassociates.net
“No matter where you sit outside, there’s an amazing, colorful view,” says Ongania, of Southampton-based landscaping firm Mahoney Associates. The 28-year nursery pro and arborist, along with colleague Nasir Molla, chose flowers that bloom all summer, shrubs that will stay green through the winter, and hardy grasses that welcome bare feet.

Article source: http://www.coastalliving.com/homes/decorating/2016-hamptons-showhouse-design-team

Needs a little TLC: The ‘Tree House’ in Madison is sitting pretty

My Everyday Magic

It’s, quite simply, an exercise in daily gratitude. If something in your day makes you smile, that’s Everyday Magic.

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Article source: http://www.shorelinetimes.com/articles/2016/08/02/news/doc57a101681c237560983433.txt

Oak Ridge North considers citizen’s rezoning petition

During an Aug. 1 Oak Ridge North Planning and Zoning Commission meeting, city officials and Robinson Road residents discussed the process of rezoning homes on the street from a residential to commercial usage.

“We’ve gotten a petition from the majority of property owners on Robinson Road to rezone properties to commercial zoning,” city attorney Chris Nichols said. “This is no different procedure from any other rezoning; we need to go through all the same requirements and meetings. We also need to discuss what commercial uses should be.”

Fifteen properties west of Blueberry Hill Drive on Robinson Road are listed on the petition that requests another zoning classification to allow for commercial uses. Nichols said the issue will take several meetings, along with public hearings, notices in the newspaper, reports made to the City Council and notification of property owners within 200 feet of properties that may be rezoned so they can voice their concerns.

Residents at the meeting were also given a list of examples and possible guidelines of Robinson Road rezoning issues and housing uses. City manager Vicky Rudy said the zoning ideas are in no way a proposal and do not act as ordinances, but rather they are examples of what exists in other places.

Some of the examples listed for possible zoning rules are that no business related sounds should be audible from the dwelling, only low-impact businesses are allowed, such as professional services, office services, insurance offices and computer application and there are required sidewalks and landscaping for homes that are converted to a business.

“These are examples of possible zoning ideas meant as a conversation starter and something to take home with you,” Rudy said. “It’s a worksheet and it’s what exists out there in other places.”

Residents at the meeting made it clear to the planning and zoning commission members that they want the proposed zoning change to just include the option of being able to sell their homes in the future as part of commercial zoning. ORN resident Al Overstreet said homes would be hard to sell as part of residential zoning because of the proposed construction to alleviate traffic on Robinson Road.

“Our intention is to not just take a fortune and up and leave,” Overstreet said. “Most of us are going to stay there. This is only giving us an option to sell our home in case.”

Cleo Tarver, chairman of the planning and zoning commission, told residents at the meeting that the commission will continue to consider their request. The petition for rezoning will be a continuous agenda item at future planning and zoning commission meetings.

 

Article source: https://communityimpact.com/houston/the-woodlands/development-construction/2016/08/02/oak-ridge-north-considers-citizens-rezoning-petition/

The Rich Even Have Better Bugs in Their Homes

Photo: An English country estate in Southlake, Texas. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

The perks of living in a wealthy neighborhood include better indoor bugs, according to a new study that found higher income areas have greater bug diversity, which is an indicator of a healthier ecosystem.

Earlier studies have shown that plants, birds, bats and lizards are also more diverse in wealthier neighborhoods, but the new study, published in the journal Royal Society Biology Letters, is the first to show that the “luxury effect” extends to indoor creatures.

“The luxury effect is the observed phenomenon of elevated biodiversity in neighborhoods of greater affluence,” lead author Misha Leong, a postdoctoral researcher at the California Academy of Sciences’ Institute for Biodiversity Science and Sustainability, told Discovery News. “Our paper shows that despite the perceived impermeability of our homes, this effect can extend indoors as well. This is likely due to homes acting as reflections of the ecological dynamics occurring outdoors.”

RELATED: Insects Are Conscious and Egocentric

The study focused on arthropods, which include insects, spiders, crustaceans and other organisms without a backbone or spinal column and that have a segmented body, jointed limbs, and usually a rigid external body covering. Leong and colleagues Matthew Bertone, Keith Bayless, Robert Dunn and Michelle Trautwein surveyed living and dead arthropods found inside 50 homes within a 40-mile radius of central Raleigh, North Carolina.

Photo: North Carolina’s Governor’s Mansion in Raleigh. Credit: Mark Turner, Wikimedia Commons

The researchers found that homes in wealthier neighborhoods host higher indoor arthropod diversity that were mostly not pests. Part of the reason is a higher abundance of outside vegetation nearby — even when the homes, themselves, didn’t necessary have private gardens.

“This can be due to neighbors investing more in landscaping with plants, city parks being closer, or other management decisions that influence local vegetation and are dependent on financial resources and social priorities,” Leong said.

In short, it takes a village to have good bugs.

A caveat to the findings is that the luxury effect applies more to suburban and borderline rural and urban areas rather than to highly vegetated rural environments or to major urban centers. Any home in a in rural area, for example, is likely to have greater indoor biodiversity than, say, an expensive penthouse suite in Manhattan.

Photo: 15 Central Park West, a prestigious condominium building in Manhattan. Credit: Thomas Craven, Wikimedia Commons

Even if a person is stuck in a lower income home with a bunch of indoor pest bugs there is still hope, the researchers suggest.

“Improving one’s individual property can make a difference both directly and indirectly,” Leong said. “It can contribute to providing resources for local arthropods, and also serve as a catalyst for inspiring change in other neighbors. It’s been observed, especially with front yards, that neighbors tend to copy/emulate one another in landscaping decisions.”

RELATED: Why Do Cockroaches Even Exist?

The best solution is to invest in native plants from a variety of species. Organic gardening further encourages a well-balanced arthropod population, some of whose members would invariably find their way indoors from time to time.

It’s close to impossible to keep a home entirely bug-free. People and pets bring some insects in, while other arthropods either intentionally, or by mistake, wind up indoors.

Vernard Lewis, an urban entomologist at the University of California at Berkeley, told Discovery News that the new research is important because it “will add baseline information that can aid in new neighborhood development, planning open spaces, pest management policies and public science education.”

WATCH: Why Do Cockroaches Even Exist?

Article source: http://www.seeker.com/the-rich-even-have-better-bugs-in-their-homes-1956560099.html

Will replacing thirsty lawns with drought-tolerant plants make L.A. …

Last summer, a revolution occurred in Los Angeles landscaping: Across the city, tens of thousands of homeowners tore up their water-thirsty lawns and replaced them with gravel, turf, decomposed granite and a wide range of drought-tolerant plants at a rate never seen before.

The water-saving benefits of this massive landscape overhaul are undisputed — and that’s important in a region that was facing what researchers called the worst drought in 1,200 years. Still, some experts warned that Angelenos’ zeal to use less water in the backyard would ultimately make the city warmer.

“Gardens and lawns act as air conditioning for L.A., which is only getting hotter with climate change,” landscape designers Mia Lehrer, Claire Latané and Margot Jacobs wrote in a 2015 op-ed in the Los Angeles Times. “Plants and trees provide shade and transpire moisture to cool the air; gravel and artificial turf don’t.”

The trio advocated replacing water-hungry landscapes with living landscapes that require almost no irrigation at all. But an environmentally sensitive Angeleno might still find herself confused: Could even savvy drought-tolerant landscaping cause the city to heat up? 

Now there is a scientific answer to that question. 

In a paper published Monday in Geophysical Research Letters, University of Southern California post-doctoral research associate Pouya Vahmani and USC civil and environmental engineering professor George Ban-Weiss analyze what would happen to the city’s overall temperature during the month of July if every lawn were replaced with drought-tolerant plants.

deborah.netburn@latimes.com

Do you love science? I do! Follow me @DeborahNetburn and “like” Los Angeles Times Science Health on Facebook.

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Article source: http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-lawn-drought-plants-20160801-snap-story.html

Volunteer brightens Golden Living retirement home with gardens – Observer


Karen Cappellini of Morgan Township waters a vegetable garden that she volunteered her time to build at the Golden LivingCenter’s facility in Franklin Township.


From left, Golden LivingCenter at Waynesburg Executive Director Jackie Hainer-Weaver, volunteer Karen Cappellini and, in front, Lacey Braddock pose in front of Golden Living’s float at the Jacktown Fair July 19. The float, built by Cappellini and her sister, Carol Spitznogle, won first place.



WAYNESBURG – Karen Cappellini works full-time as a legal secretary and also runs her beef cattle farm in Morgan Township, but recently, she’s tacked on another project to her busy schedule.



As a volunteer at Golden LivingCenter in Franklin Township, the 53-year-old started out doing some small painting jobs inside the retirement home, but soon took on the larger project of building multiple gardens at the facility and doing all the landscaping around the campus.



“It’s been very, very gratifying,” she said. “I just wanted to do something for them and it makes the residents feel like they’re more at home. It gives me enjoyment seeing them enjoy it.”



Cappellini started the project in early spring. She said she’s loved gardening and landscaping her whole life and it’s a hobby for her. She said Golden LivingCenter does pay her a little bit, but she puts the money right back into purchasing flowers, vegetables, seeds and other items for the landscaping.



“She put in a lot of her own money to put in flowers and rocks and stone and plants and a vegetable garden,” said Rachal Estle, who is Cappellini’s daughter-in-law and also the social service director for the Golden LivingCenter. “She put in a fairy garden with grape vine and white Christmas lights all around it.”



“It is beautiful,” she said. “The residents loved it and they love Karen. They were just in awe.”



Estle said the residents especially appreciated Cappellini’s work because many of them remember having gardens at their previous homes before they came to Golden Living.



“A lot of our elderly residents did gardening and landscaping at their former homes, but they can’t do that anymore,” she said.



After the landscaping and gardens were complete the center held a garden party, that started with a picnic lunch and ended with a butterfly release July 15. The residents also got to take back to their rooms a small basket with vegetables from the garden.



“Residents and their family members could take a tour and we had ordered real butterflies in envelopes from Florida and had them over-nighted here,” Estle said.



Cappellini’s creativity for the center didn’t end with the landscaping. She and her sister, Carol Spitznogle, spent three weeks building the Golden Living float for the Jacktown Fair parade, winning first place.



“We had a wheelbarrow in the center filled with flowers, a fountain with running water, a tree with lights on it, a porch with a swing and beautiful flowers everywhere,” Cappellini said.



Her volunteer work is part of a theme the center, which averages 102 residents, started about six months ago.



“We’re trying to do good by the residents for their mental health and relaxation and Karen is helping us pull it off,” Estle said.



Estle said they are planning to hold a carnival for the residents and their families in the parking lot Aug. 26, with cotton candy, funnel cakes, snow cones, a petting zoo, games, activities and even a chance for the residents to smush pie in the faces of employees.



“It’s fair time and they can’t get out to those anymore, so we’re going to bring it to them instead,” Estle said.



They’re also planning to have Cappellini work on a float for the Christmas parade hosted by Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce.



“I just love how well they treat their residents,” Cappellini said. “It feels like home when I’m there.”

Article source: http://www.observer-reporter.com/20160802/volunteer_brightens_golden_living_retirement_home_with_gardens

Gardening Tips: Adding personality to the garden – SooToday.com

This is City Beautification judging time. As a volunteer judge, we get to peek into some very interesting local gardens.

What struck me this year was all the different elements people had used to add personality to their yards. The focal points used were both varied and inventive.

After all, the purpose of a focal point in the garden is to draw the eye as we try to direct the viewer’s attention to a particular area. As an example: a plain grouping of shrubs and perennials may not do the job for a roadside garden. Most people are viewing it from a moving vehicle.

Add in a piece of garden statuary and the eye is drawn there. We stop to look and then admire all the plants in the garden.

There is a real art to adding your own personality to a garden. You have to consider many factors, choose appropriate objects and then know when to stop! I have seen quite a few gardens that would have been great if the homeowner has stopped a little sooner.

You have to be able to draw the eye and then allow for a nice perusal of the outdoor space. If you carry on a little too far, you attract attention but don’t give the viewer a chance to slowly appreciate all of your hard work. The eye bounces from one element to the next making you a little dizzy!

I will admit that outdoor, or for that matter indoor, decorating is not my forte. I can layout a garden and choose the right plants very well. It is the artistic use of accessories that add personality to the space that I struggle a bit with. However, I do know the principles you should follow.

Choose a strong focal point to draw the eye. It can be an outstanding tree, shrub, perennial, a pot of annuals, a statue, a sculpture, a fountain, etc… If using plants, just be sure the scale of the plant is bold enough to do the job.

A contrast in texture, colour or shape can make a plant outstanding. The bold leaves of a hosta can draw the eye to a shady garden filled with lacy ferns. A weeping larch will stand out amongst shrubs that have a rounded or spreading shape.

As always, be sure that the plant you choose is well suited to the conditions you are going to place it in. A Globe Blue Spruce standard is perfect for a full sun garden but would be very unhappy in the shade.

If you are using an object to draw the eye rather than a plant, you have two ways to go about this. Either choose something that is in keeping with your house style or pick an object that is a complete contrast. Either one will do the job.

In a country setting with a farm style house, a large vintage piece of farm equipment will work well. But as a contrast, one very modern element would also stand out.

A piece of very contemporary garden art could add a touch of the unexpected to your landscape. That can really make a statement too.

In general, when decorating in the garden, it all comes down to personal taste. If you need a starting point, take a look inside your home. You may be quite comfortable with indoor decorating and can find some inspiration there.

Look through garden magazines, go on garden tours, visit art shows, watch outdoor living programs on television, visit a garden centre or take a walk/drive around town.

There is lots of inspiration to be found. I am sure you can find a style to suit your personality and your home.

A word of caution though: try not to take your decorating too far. Someone once told me that you don’t want your space to look like a ‘dog’s breakfast’; a mish-mash of too much ‘stuff’. That phrase has always stuck in my mind and helped me resist taking things too far!

Article source: https://www.sootoday.com/columns/gardening-tips/gardening-tips-adding-personality-to-the-garden-345239

Garden Tips for August

By Thea Fiskin

U. C. Master Gardeners

August is the month to use wise-watering practices to keep your plants alive during the long, hot days. It’s also a great time to start planning your winter vegetable garden. Seed catalogs will start filling your mailbox and are also readily available on-line, so take a moment to sit in the shade and plan a garden project for the cooler weather.

Water wisely: This is your primary concern for August. Follow drought restrictions on watering, but be sure to water trees and shrubs deeply at least once a month. Deep watering will induce roots to grow deeper in the soil where they are less likely to dry out. Light watering actually wastes water because it doesn’t reach the root zone. The best way to check is to take a trowel or shovel and dig down six to eight inches and check soil moisture. The soil should be slightly damp — if the ground is so hard you can’t dig down, water is not reaching the roots. Drought resistant trees and shrubs don’t need to be watered as often, but the principle of deep watering still applies.

What to plant: It’s time to plan a winter vegetable garden while you are relaxing from the summer heat. Our local nurseries have a great variety of seeds, but also check out catalogs and the Internet for new, unusual, or heritage seed varieties. Try something not available at the local supermarket like purple, yellow, red or white carrots. Seeds of cole crops like bok choy, broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower are usually seeded in small pots and later planted into the garden. Root crops such as beets, carrots, parsnips and turnips are seeded directly into the planting beds. Some seeds, such as carrots and onions, come in seed tapes which makes it much easier to get the proper spacing.

Because of the heat and drought, it is a poor time to do any other planting. Wait until September or October.

Maintenance: Prune hybrid tea roses in late August to promote a new flush of blooms in October. This is not the severe pruning of winter, so be gentle. Remove spent flowers, lanky growth, and any suckers from the base of the plant.

Rejuvenate your summer-blooming annuals and perennials. Remove faded blooms, pinch back any leggy growth, then lightly fertilize and water. This works wonders on geraniums, marigolds, salvias, verbenas and zinnias.

August is also the month to divide German iris. Lift the entire clump with a spading fork or shovel and discard the oldest, bloomed out rhizomes. Remove any disfigured leaves and rotted portions. Then trim the leaves to about six inches. Set the exposed sections in the sun to dry and from a callus over any cut sections. Prepare the area you are going to replant with extra compost or fertilizer. Plant the rhizomes just below the surface, water well and mulch.

Remember to keep harvesting your summer veggies, hopefully they will keep producing till the frost in November.

Fruit trees: Support heavily laden fruit branches to keep them from breaking. Dispose of any fallen fruit, as they will harbor pests. Apricots and olives should be pruned now rather than in the winter to prevent fungal disease problems.

Weeds: Control of weeds is always very important. Weeds in the garden rob your plants of water and nutrients, harbor insects and viruses, and sometimes grow tall enough to shade your flowers and shrubs. On top of that, weeds are not aesthetically pleasing in front yards of neighborhoods and can drive down the value of homes. So even if you have ditched your lawn in order to save water, please mow down your weeds and tidy up your front yards. Be diligent and take pride in where you live!

For answers to all your home gardening questions, call Master Gardeners in Tulare County at (559) 684-3325, Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9:30 and 11:30 am; or Kings County at (559) 852-2736, Thursday Only, 9:30-11:30 a.m; or visit our web site: cetulare.ucdavis.edu.

– To contact the Tulare/Kings Master Gardener Program, call 559-684-3325, e-mail cetulare@ucdavis.edu or write to 4437 S. Laspina St., Suite B, Tulare, CA 93247.

– This column is not a news article but the opinion of the writer and does not reflect the views of The Foothills Sun-Gazette newspaper.

Article source: http://www.thesungazette.com/article/lifestyles/2016/07/27/garden-tips-for-august/

Gardening Tips: Adding personality to the garden

This is City Beautification judging time. As a volunteer judge, we get to peek into some very interesting local gardens.

What struck me this year was all the different elements people had used to add personality to their yards. The focal points used were both varied and inventive.

After all, the purpose of a focal point in the garden is to draw the eye as we try to direct the viewer’s attention to a particular area. As an example: a plain grouping of shrubs and perennials may not do the job for a roadside garden. Most people are viewing it from a moving vehicle.

Add in a piece of garden statuary and the eye is drawn there. We stop to look and then admire all the plants in the garden.

There is a real art to adding your own personality to a garden. You have to consider many factors, choose appropriate objects and then know when to stop! I have seen quite a few gardens that would have been great if the homeowner has stopped a little sooner.

You have to be able to draw the eye and then allow for a nice perusal of the outdoor space. If you carry on a little too far, you attract attention but don’t give the viewer a chance to slowly appreciate all of your hard work. The eye bounces from one element to the next making you a little dizzy!

I will admit that outdoor, or for that matter indoor, decorating is not my forte. I can layout a garden and choose the right plants very well. It is the artistic use of accessories that add personality to the space that I struggle a bit with. However, I do know the principles you should follow.

Choose a strong focal point to draw the eye. It can be an outstanding tree, shrub, perennial, a pot of annuals, a statue, a sculpture, a fountain, etc… If using plants, just be sure the scale of the plant is bold enough to do the job.

A contrast in texture, colour or shape can make a plant outstanding. The bold leaves of a hosta can draw the eye to a shady garden filled with lacy ferns. A weeping larch will stand out amongst shrubs that have a rounded or spreading shape.

As always, be sure that the plant you choose is well suited to the conditions you are going to place it in. A Globe Blue Spruce standard is perfect for a full sun garden but would be very unhappy in the shade.

If you are using an object to draw the eye rather than a plant, you have two ways to go about this. Either choose something that is in keeping with your house style or pick an object that is a complete contrast. Either one will do the job.

In a country setting with a farm style house, a large vintage piece of farm equipment will work well. But as a contrast, one very modern element would also stand out.

A piece of very contemporary garden art could add a touch of the unexpected to your landscape. That can really make a statement too.

In general, when decorating in the garden, it all comes down to personal taste. If you need a starting point, take a look inside your home. You may be quite comfortable with indoor decorating and can find some inspiration there.

Look through garden magazines, go on garden tours, visit art shows, watch outdoor living programs on television, visit a garden centre or take a walk/drive around town.

There is lots of inspiration to be found. I am sure you can find a style to suit your personality and your home.

A word of caution though: try not to take your decorating too far. Someone once told me that you don’t want your space to look like a ‘dog’s breakfast’; a mish-mash of too much ‘stuff’. That phrase has always stuck in my mind and helped me resist taking things too far!

Article source: https://www.sootoday.com/columns/gardening-tips/gardening-tips-adding-personality-to-the-garden-345239