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Archives for July 7, 2016

Honor and remember: Supper-comedy event raises funds for planned Brewster Veterans Memorial

Behrends, himself a veteran having served with the Minnesota National Guard’s 1-125th Field Artillery Battalion, 34th Division, in Iraq and member of both the Brewster American Legion and Sons of the American Legion, has spearheaded the effort to build a veterans memorial in Brewster. The design incorporates ideas from other community’s memorials, but also has a few features that will make it unique.

“I guess since I’m an Iraq vet, I looked at the boot stand,” said Behrends, referring to the custom of arranging a fallen soldier’s boots, rifle and helmet as a memorial, “as being an iconic image for our time frame, then with a soldier kneeling or praying in front of it.”

Additionally, Behrends wanted to pay tribute to one of his own comrades, Sgt. Kyle Miller, who died in Iraq in 206 while serving with the 34th Division. He got in contact with Miller’s mother, and she gave permission for a bronze statue of her son to be part of the Brewster monument.

Like many such memorials, pavers will be part of the design: Black pavers will be engraved with the name, rank and unit and branch of service, conflict and dates of service for area veterans. But there will also be gray pavers to recognized people who have served their country and community in other ways

“Anyone else will be in gray,” said Behrends, referencing firefighters, emergency medical personnel, Sons of the American Legion members, Legion auxiliary members and even businesses that might want to support the memorial and be part of it. “I know that my brother stayed back and held down the farm while I was gone. … They’re doing their part for their country, too, and I know I would be honored to have them surrounding me.”

Some other components will pay tribute to those who lost their lives during the 9-11 terrorist attacks on American soil. At the entrance to the memorial site will stand 1:200 scale models of the World Trace Center twin towers. Beyond the towers will be the Walk of Honor, honoring the 34th Division Red Bulls with pavers appropriately set in groups of 34.

At the walk’s end, a pentagon-shaped monument will recall the attack on the Pentagon on 9-11, with the five branches of the service inscribed on it, topped with the statue of Miller. Four flags — U.S., state, POW/MIA and the Honor-Remember flag, which was specifically requested by Miller’s mother — will be surrounded by landscaping meant to honor the 9-11 victims on Flight 93, which crashed into a meadow near Shanksville, Pa.

Benches will allow people to sit and reflect on the monument’s meaning.

“It’s coming together real well,” said Behrends about the design and fundraising for the project. “The Legion itself had a nest egg built up from bingo and whatever over the years, and the Sons of the American Legion has done really well with our bean bag tournaments and raffles.”

Paver sales have also gone well, Behrends noted, and there is room for many more to be incorporated into the design so it can be expanded well into the future. He expects construction of the monument to begin sometime yet this summer and continue into the fall, with a target of dedicating it next summer.

But some fundraising is still necessary, and such an event is planned for Friday evening —  a pork chop dinner and comedy show at the Brewster American Legion Hall. It will feature Roger Peterson, a 1978 alumnus of Brewster High School, now living in San Diego, Calif., area. A former club manager and aspiring comedian himself, Peterson is bringing in a national touring comic, Isaac Milton Witty, and will serve as emcee for the evening.

“I will keep the show moving,” said Peterson, who began performing at open mic events in the Twin Cities and continues to dabble in comedy as a hobby. “This gives me an opportunity to keep in touch with comedy and bring comedy to a town like Brewster that never really has that opportunity to be exposed to something like that.”

For Peterson, who is also a Sons of the American Legion member, it’s also a way to give back to his hometown and the veterans.

“It’s all about raising funds in a fun way to help build that memorial there,” he said. “That’s what it’s all about.”

The supper will be served from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Legion hall. The menu includes a smoked pork chop, cheesy hashbrown potatoes, cowboy beans, coleslaw and a dinner roll. The show is set to begin at 8 p.m. People can choose to just do the meal, just do the show, or both, with tickets priced accordingly, noted Behrends.

People can get advanced reservations — with a slightly reduced price — by contacting Behrends: email Thomas.Behrends@gmail.com, and leave your name and the number of people in your party; or phone 360-3057.

A raffle is also in the works, with prizes to include cash and a Henry Golden boy military tribute rifle; the drawing will take place at the end of Brewster Fun Days, July 15-17.

For more information about the veterans memorial, a Facebook page has been set up — Brewster Veterans Memorial; brochures are available at Brewster City Hall; or contact Behrends directly.

Article source: http://www.dglobe.com/news/4068857-honor-and-remember-supper-comedy-event-raises-funds-planned-brewster-veterans-memorial

Share ideas to transform community

What’s your $100,000 idea? You may have one and not even know it. Centre Foundation wants to hear your ideas that could encourage local, community involvement through the environment around us. The Centre Inspires season has just started, so now is the time to share your great idea.

Centre Inspires, which is Centre Foundation’s largest collaborative granting process, is in its third year and has already produced two innovative projects in our community. This annual grant focuses on transformational ideas for community engagement, with a rotating sub-emphasis: arts, health and social services, and now environment.

Summer is a great time for inspiration, so put those thinking caps on and bring your ideas to one of the Centre Inspires brainstorming sessions in July. These informal sessions, hosted by Centre Foundation staff, are a great place to get feedback on your idea, stretch your idea further, find a partner, hear other ideas and learn more about this innovative grant process.

To apply, you only need a one-page, 500-word description that answers the prompt: What project(s) would you like to implement to encourage the people of Centre County to be more engaged in their community by focusing on the environment around them? Projects must be both highly engaging and highly visible in the community and may focus on aesthetics, enjoyment, conservation, or general engagement with the land and animals that are part of our region.

Full application packets can be found at our website at centre-foundation.org or by calling 237-6229.

First-round applications for the $100,000 grant are due by 5 p.m. July 21. On that day, Centre Foundation is happily anticipating a flood of inspirational and transformative ideas. Please submit completed applications by email only to the grants and scholarship coordinator, Ashley Pipe, at ashley@centre-foundation.org.

In 2014, the Centre Inspires inaugural project winner was the Book Benches of Centre County, which was inspired by an art installation in London. SPE Federal Credit Union and the Child Development Family Council of Centre County partnered and envisioned installing benches in the shape of open books across Centre County. Local artists, students and other community groups came together to paint benches with scenes inspired by our communities and our history. Today, these benches can be found in every part of the county — from Snow Shoe to Philipsburg, from Bellefonte to Bald Eagle, and right in front of the State College Municipal Building. You can also visit the Book Benches of Centre County Facebook page.

In 2015, a community partnership overseen by New Leaf Initiative recognized both the bounty of locally grown produce and the nutrition gap that some of our more vulnerable neighbors and their children were enduring. Their solution was the Food Centres — retrofitted shipping containers that provide expanded, refrigerated storage capacity for fresh produce, available exclusively to food pantries. By enhancing the mission and the work of these important organizations, food pantries can now offer their clients fresh, nutritious vegetables and fruits — a welcome supplement to the traditional nonperishable boxed and canned options. The first Food Centre was installed this spring at the Old Gregg School in Spring Mills with additional landscaping and edible gardens accompanying it. These gardens will provide the ingredients for food literacy and cooking classes; children and adults alike can enjoy hands-on experiences like growing and assembling fresh salads, the toppings for pizza, and other easy-to-make recipes. Again, you may visit the Facebook page to see more pictures and learn more about this project.

So, what’s your $100,000 idea to encourage community engagement through the environment around us? We invite you to bring your idea to a brainstorming session to learn tactics for stretching your idea, finding partners and taking it to the next level. We’ll help you fine-tune your idea and assist with ideas to make your application great.

Centre Foundation’s staff and board members are eager to read the community’s inspired ideas by the July 21 deadline. We are here to assist you as your idea moves through this innovative granting process, so please contact our office at 237-6229 or visit centre-foundation.org.

Molly Kunkel is Centre Foundation executive director.

INTERESTED

IN APPLYING?

For a full application packet or more information:

▪  Visit centre-foundation.org

▪  Call 237-6229

▪  Email Ashley Pipe, grants and scholarships coordinator, at ashley@ centre-foundation.org

▪  Attend a brainstorming session (all sessions will be held at Centre Foundation’s office, 1377 Ridge Master Drive in State College, just off Blue Course Drive): 3:30-5:30 p.m. Thursday; 4:30-6:30 p.m. Monday; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. July 15

Article source: http://www.centredaily.com/opinion/article88114812.html

At Marion Biergarten, beer and camaraderie on tap – Seguin Gazette

Marion Biergarten

Tommy Bonner, owner of Marion Biergarten serves a full bar from 4:30 p.m. to midnight on Monday through Friday and until 1 a.m. on the weekends.

Marion Biergarten

Tommy Bonner, owner of Marion Biergarten serves a full bar from 4:30 p.m. to midnight on Monday through Friday and until 1 a.m. on the weekends.



Posted: Thursday, July 7, 2016 12:00 am

At Marion Biergarten, beer and camaraderie on tap

Jennifer Luna
jennifer.luna@seguingazette.com

Seguin Gazette

|
0 comments

After much hesitation, Marion is now embracing its new hangout spot at the Marion Biergarten.

Although it’s only been open for two months, the public support has been overwhelming, business partner Marshall Hogan said.

“Everybody is receiving it very well; we’re getting lots of compliments,” he said. “Marion is really excited. We’ve been getting people from Seguin, Cibolo, Shertz, Santa Clara, Selma and New Braunfels.”

Beer garden owner Tommy Bonner said it all started as a plan to revive his business. His idea was simple: Invite people to come have a beer under the oak trees after work.

“I like to drink beer under these trees after work sometimes,” he said. “I thought I’d just take that gift shop, turn it into a bar and put a little spot under here to sit around and drink beer.”

With a background in landscaping, Bonner explained how he morphed his experience in with his new business to create a relaxing environment for patrons.

Every detail around the beer garden serves as a purpose, he said.

“The tables are lower than the chairs on purpose, so you can put your feet on them,” Bonner said. “They’re built out of rock, so they don’t fade, look ugly or crack.”

He also talked about a metal pipe which frames the tree oak area facing the gazebo that was made into a bar to lean on. Bonner said he added that piece one day after talking with someone and thought it’d be nice to have a bar to lean on.

“Every square inch of this place has a reason why it got done that way,” Bonner said.

While Bonner had a heavy hand in creating the bar, Hogan helps run it.

Already an owner of bars in San Marcos and New Braunfels, Hogan said the beer garden is something Marion needs to amp up the city and to help to contribute to its growth.

“Say a young couple or single person looks at Marion as a place to move, they’re kind of going to want to look at what they’re going to do,” he said. “This kind of brings a new light to Marion. People may want to come here because there will be more things to do.”

Bonner and Hogan are in the works for hosting a grand opening for the beer garden.

As for now, they invite you to sit back under the shade with a glass of wine or a cold beer.

“Our specialty is ambiance,” Hogan said. “We have a full bar. All these people want is a nice cold beer or a glass of wine with a relaxed atmosphere to have a drink at.”

Out of 28 reviews on Facebook, 22 people gave the bar five stars and two people gave four stars.

Many commenters raved about the atmosphere of the beer garden and selection of beers.

Shaulyn Canham Cook said,“This place is a great addition to our small town. Great beer selection and awesome atmosphere.”

Another commenter, Jc Garza gave the beer garden five stars and said, “Tommy and Marshall are doing something right and special out there, go support our local nursery and have a cool one with the locals!!!!”

At the end of the day, Bonner said he planned and hoped for a successful turnout, but he still can’t believe at what he’s already accomplished.

“I was telling my wife, I don’t know how the place even really came together,” he said. “I had a bunch of ideas on stuff I wanted and where I wanted it and how it got done, and at the end of the project, it all came together real nicely. With the reception (the soft opening) that we’ve had and what people have been telling us, it’s been unreal.”


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Thursday, July 7, 2016 12:00 am.

Article source: http://seguingazette.com/news/article_b7347adc-43cd-11e6-abd6-73c4391f6318.html

Ultra-high-end projects shape landscape architect’s long career

The mansion owned by the late Ed Snider, owner of the Philadelphia Flyers, is just one of Truskowski’s projects.
Photo: Zillow

People in the business of offering business tips say you should find your niche and own it. For landscape architect Robert E. Truskowski, that niche was ultra-high-end residential work.

Born in Compton, California, Truskowski moved to La Habra and attended California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. He started out majoring in civil engineering but found that landscape architecture was more intriguing to him.

He started his firm in 1971 and was faced with a peculiar challenge early on. One client requested that he build and indoor-outdoor lagoon, complete with moray eels, garibaldi, oysters and lobsters that could become guests’ eventual dinner.

The house was located along Newport Beach’s Promontory Bay and Truskowski needed to figure out how to filter the polluted bay water.

He contacted renowned oceanographer Jacques Cousteau, who in turn put Truskowski in touch with biologists at the University of California Berkeley. Together they figured out the details for a filtration system.

Truskowski specializes in creating gardens for celebrities, royalty and the like.
Photo: Zillow

Another project that involved a lagoon was for a palace on the Red Sea. This time the inhabitants were pointer sharks and other local aquatic life.

“He has in-house oceanographers,” Truskowski told the Orange County Register.

Because of the extremely high temperatures of the region, Truskowski had to set up a pump that would draw cooler water from a well 700 feet down and recycle the water daily.

For the landscaping, he selected subtropical trees that traveled in open containers for a month to get from Florida to the Middle East.

Truskowski has become quite the globetrotter in his 45 years of working. He estimates that he has flown 15 million miles in his career while searching for exotic plants, checking on projects and attending design summits.

In Cape Martin, France, Truskowski designed 12 interconnected gardens for the Villa Torre Clementina, a 19th century estate that had been long neglected. After restoration of the gardens, the French government gave the location national landmark status in 1993, unaware that the plants were new.

Another European restoration was carried out in the Austrian Alps, where he designed gardens for a hunting castle that had belonged to Archduke Franz Ferdinand. He even created a coat of arms of the stable roof out of red, pink and white begonias that could be seen from the castle.

He has worked on more than 2,000 gardens and landscape projects that range anywhere from $1 million to $5 million.

“A lot of the homes I do are vacation homes,” he said. “These people have four, five, six houses.”

This garden features succulents and exotic plants, paying tribute to Lotusland.
Photo: Zillow

He specializes in restoring and creating innovative design solutions. One of Truskowski’s projects can currently be bought for the price of $52 million. The late owner of the Philadelphia Flyers, Ed Snider, had his 9.4-acre estate restored by the landscape architect.

Part of the grounds were originally designed in 1947 by landscape architect Lockwood de Forest Jr. and Truskowski was able to integrate later parcels with the same style.

“My goal was to do the new overall garden to appear as it was done by the same hand,” he said.

Article source: http://www.totallandscapecare.com/famous-landscape-architect-projects/

Affordable Starter Homes in the Missoula Area

A long-held maxim in Real Estate is that One should purchase the most affordable and/or distressed house in a great neighborhood for a sound real estate investment. This c. 1950, Single Level ”Sweat Equity Special” is located within the coveted Lewis and Clark School District, and is offered at a price point that will allow you to get a toe-hold within an area where properties sell for much higher prices. Located on a corner lot, 201 Livingston Avenue is fully fenced, and the towering Maple, Elm and Douglas Fir Trees offer a cool, green and shady canopy for the 3,184’Lot, which offers raised garden beds and a sweet, manageable lawn, too. Lewis and Clark Elementary, Sentinel High School, the University of Montana, area parks, Splash Montana are all within easy walking, biking distances!

View Listing

Article source: http://missoulian.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/affordable-starter-homes-in-the-missoula-area/collection_e746b42b-c9fd-5072-819d-03f1ec8b1a3c.html

OLLI at Auburn hosts Brown Bag program featuring the gardens and grounds of Disney

OLLI at Auburn hosts Brown Bag program featuring the gardens and grounds of Disney

Pictured are flower beds at Epcot. The flower beds are located adjacent to the ponds that separate Future World and World Showcase.

OLLI at Auburn hosts Brown Bag program featuring the gardens and grounds of Disney

Scott Girard will present a talk about the gardens and grounds of Disney called “Gardening with Mickey…a Peek behind the Curtain.”



Posted: Wednesday, July 6, 2016 1:51 pm
|


Updated: 1:59 pm, Wed Jul 6, 2016.

OLLI at Auburn hosts Brown Bag program featuring the gardens and grounds of Disney

Special to the News

oanow.com

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Auburn University will host a Brown Bag Lunch and Learn on Tuesday, July 12, at Clarion Inn Suites, 1577 S. College St., Auburn. Scott Girard will present a talk about the gardens and grounds of Disney called “Gardening with Mickey…a Peek behind the Curtain.”

The program begins at 11:30 a.m., and the public is invited. There is no charge. Attendees are asked to bring their own lunch and drink.

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Updated: 1:59 pm.


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Article source: http://www.oanow.com/news/auburn/olli-at-auburn-hosts-brown-bag-program-featuring-the-gardens/article_b1a5b61c-43aa-11e6-9776-b7219e858c7a.html

Keep your garden going great with these winter gardening tips

It’s that time of the year when perhaps all you’d like to do is stay warm and cuddled under blankets in the comfort of your home. Your garden is probably the last place you’re thinking of being, but you shouldn’t let the cold weather put you off. July and August are far from sleepy months in the garden. It’s when you can admire cool-weather flowerings, prune and prepare for the botanical explosion to come in spring. Here’s a rough guide to keep in mind while considering gardening in the winter:

1. Keep your tools handy: Sharpen, clean, oil and maintain your garden tools when you’re not actively using them. While it may sound like a lot of work, it will save you a lot of cash in the long run. Practising tool hygiene will prevent the spread of disease.

2. Mulch your beds: Top up mulch on your veggie patches, herb gardens and ornamental beds. If you don’t have any of these and are only starting out on your first ones of each, just add mulch to enrich the soil and prepare it for gardening in the months to follow. Choose sustainable, low environmental impact mulch, one that will benefit the environment as it breaks down.

3. Pruning and weeding: This is the best time of year to do jobs like pruning and weeding, and you might see a lot of gardens with rose bushes being pruned at the moment, as well as big fruit trees — except apricot trees. 

4. Prepare plants for what’s to come: Although many plants are resting, spring bulbs, winter-flowering natives and shrubs that flower in early spring are growing actively. Keep these watered and fertilised for peak performance. Feed citrus in late July, using an all-purpose citrus fertiliser. Keep sowing carrots, spring onions, leeks, broad beans, radishes, English spinach and peas.

5. For cool to cold areas: In all of Tasmania, most of Victoria, the southern highlands of New South Wales, the ACT and a tiny southern bit of South Australia it’s time to get deciduous fruit trees in now, including apples, pears, plums, peaches and nectarines. Deciduous exotic trees can also be planted now.

6. For warm areas with occasional light frosts: Although many plants are resting, spring bulbs, winter-flowering natives and shrubs that flower in early spring are growing actively. Keep these watered and fertilised for peak performance. Feed citrus in late July, using an all-purpose citrus fertiliser. Keep sowing carrots, spring onions, leeks, broad beans, radishes, spinach and peas.

7. For temperate areas: In pretty much most of the inland, some areas of Victoria, most of SA and the southern area of Western Australia, there’s not too much happening in the veggie patch, but you could try lettuce, celery, broad beans, Jerusalem artichokes (put them in a pot or they can take over), potato, garlic, radish and spinach.

One thing that remains the same everywhere, no matter your local climate and weather zones, is this: improve your soil by adding organic matter, mulch and try to garden more sustainably all year round.

Have you been in the garden during the cooler months? What are your winter gardening tips?

Article source: https://startsat60.com/stories/living/diy/keep-your-garden-going-great-with-these-winter-gardening-tips

Get It Growing: Tips for a water-wise vegetable garden

Root depth

Vegetable plants with deeper roots require less frequent irrigation to maintain a healthy growth rate than those with shallow roots.

• Deep-rooted crops include asparagus, rhubarb, tomatoes and winter squash.

• Intermediate root depth plants include beans, carrots, peppers and summer squash.

• Shallow-rooted plants include arugula, celery, leeks, lettuce, onions, potatoes, radishes

 

Drought conditions in recent summers have challenged many local vegetable gardeners.

Even in times of water shortage, you can grow an abundance of fruits and vegetables by following these water-wise gardening practices.

Prepare the soil by incorporating organic matter. Organic matter helps to trap moisture, reduce surface crusting and run-off and encourage deep root formation, all of which improve plant drought tolerance.

To increase organic matter, apply 1-2 inches of compost to your garden beds each year before planting and mix it into the top 6-12 inches of soil. A single large application of compost does not do the trick; additions over many years are needed.

Plant with water conservation in mind. Consider growing vegetables with lower water requirements or those resistant to drought. Smaller varieties and those with short days to maturity usually need less water than their counterparts. Plants with deep root systems can draw moisture from deeper in the soil and often do better under drought conditions (See sidebar).

When planting, group plants with similar water needs together to increase the likelihood that all plants in a group will receive the desired amount of water (and not be overwatered).

Plant crops in blocks not rows and space plants so that their leaves will just touch when they are mature. The resulting shade will not only decrease water evaporation from the soil but discourage weeds which compete with your plants for water.

Build berms (slightly raised areas of soil) around individual larger plants such as tomatoes and peppers to help direct water to the root zone and reduce run-off.

Prevent water loss in the garden. Mulch applied to the soil surface greatly reduces evaporation and runoff, allowing water to soak in. Mulches also help control those thirsty weeds.

Recommended mulches include black plastic film, various types of paper (including newsprint and wrapping paper) and organic mulches (3-4 inches of materials such as compost, pine needles, wood bark and straw). Plastic is probably the most effective mulch for moisture conservation but organic mulches can be tilled into the soil after cropping to increase the organic matter.

Another way to prevent water loss from the soil is to limit deep cultivation. Stirring up the soil brings moist subsurface soil to the top, increasing moisture loss. Water loss also can occur from loose hose connections. Make sure to tighten your hoses and use o-rings in the base of the hose to prevent leakage.

Water wisely. Except for plants with very shallow roots (such as lettuce), water when your soil is dry 4-8 inches below the surface. Dig down to this depth and squeeze the soil in your hand; if it holds together without crumbling, the moisture probably is adequate.

Water during the cooler parts of the day (early morning or late afternoon) to minimize water loss due to evaporation.

Use watering systems that focus water at the base of plants and deliver water slowly. Soaker hoses and drip irrigation are ideal. Hand-watering also is good because the watchful gardener can respond to changing soil moisture conditions as watering occurs.

When you water, soak the soil to a depth of 6-8 inches to encourage roots to grow deep in the soil. With a deep root system, plants are better able to withstand dry periods.

Pearl of Wisdom

A cheap way to deliver water to the roots of larger plants such as squash or tomatoes is to punch holes in the bottom of a coffee can and bury it next to the plant at the time of planting. Pouring water into the can will deliver water close to the root zone with limited loss to run-off and evaporation.

For more

 

For more gardening information, attend a Saturday in the Garden presentation at the Master Gardener Demonstration Garden at 2711 Woodcock Road in Sequim. These free educational events are held on selected Saturdays. On

July 9 from 9 a.m.-noon, Clallam County Master Gardeners and members from the Olympic Orchard Society will talk about summer orchard maintenance.

 

 

 

Jeanette Stehr-Green is a WSU-certified Clallam County Master Gardener.

 

 

Article source: http://www.sequimgazette.com/community/385737061.html

Garden tips: Make your tomatoes go wild

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Article source: http://lancasteronline.com/features/home_garden/garden-tips-make-your-tomatoes-go-wild/article_e681698a-43b4-11e6-af67-43aacb37355a.html