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Archives for June 26, 2016

Learn the Art of Garden Design from Garden Designers

The patio nurseries have drawn esteem for a considerable length of time; however a brilliantly welcoming greenery enclosure is the after effect of cautious greenhouse outlining. The whole garden design methodology ought to be totally practical. Greenery enclosures ought to be outlined according to the proprietor of the greenhouse. Try not to have racks of a solitary plant variety, only in light of the fact that it is your top pick. It may ruin the whole outline of the greenery enclosure. The accessible greenhouse space, fitting daylight and easy cleaning are to be considered. A legitimate greenery enclosure unravels some disclosure or surprise at each corner.

It could be a wellspring, an all way wooden pathway or cluster of splendid blooms as opposed to the environment. Now and then dividers trellis or supports are utilized as dividers, to loan the creator look. Low dividers have least upkeep however a touch is extravagant to construct. The trellis is less expensive and adaptable. Low supports in the greenery enclosure give it an extremely characteristic look. It obliges normal trimming to keep it perfect. The decision of the patio nursery planning use relies on the space and time available to you and on the garden designers.

The accessible shape and size of region are imperative in garden designing. The bloom beds developed on square, rectangular or triangular shapes can be put at vital areas, similar to the corners or the middle. It is desirable to improve an accessible lake; it attempts to draw in the winged animals. Greenery enclosure outlining is an individual decision relying upon one’s own tastes, so let your innovativeness flow.

The different styles of garden designs incorporate Asian style, formal, casual, rock, water garden, house style or plain contemporary adapted greenery enclosure. The exertion and time expended for greenhouse support must be considered while greenery enclosure planning. Asian style for the most part alludes to the conventional Japanese or Chinese style of planting where water bodies were a typical element. Formal garden designs are all things considered found in legacy homes. They comprise of geometric patterns and shapes, to the extent the trees and fences are concerned.

Designing a garden incorporates the dividers and asphalts and is to be shaded brilliantly, as opposed to cutting them down. It is advantageous to grow a greenery enclosure along the asphalt, as opposed to needing to make asphalt along the greenhouses. Consequently, garden planning is not just about getting the outline right. It is about applying the right garden design for small gardens for the privilege homescape.

Article source: https://www.thesequitur.com/learn-the-art-of-garden-design-from-garden-designers-2250434/

Weekend startup contest set for fall – Leader

Weekend startup contest set for fall

A weekend contest where teams of entrepreneurs create ideas for a startup business will be Oct. 14 through 16 in downtown Eau Claire.

JAMF Software will host Startup 48 at the company’s downtown office building, 215 Riverfront Terrace.

A similar event last year yielded multiple business ideas that were further developed after the weekend, according to a news release.

“Every individual that was at the event continued to work with community partners to further an idea for a startup business,” said Luke Hanson, executive director of the Eau Claire Area Economic Development Corp.

Attendees came from a variety of backgrounds including developers, software coders, designers, marketers, financiers and business owners.

For more information, go to startup48.co.

Startup 48 is seeking event and prize sponsors. Businesses interested in participating can email organizers at sponsors@startup48.co.

Infinity opens July 8 in new location

Infinity Beverages Winery Distillery is opening its new location early next month in a storefront on Eau Claire’s south side.

The business will open to the public at 4 p.m. on Friday, July 8, at 3460 Mall Drive.

Amenities of the new location include a larger tasting bar, mezzanine space for meetings and small events, an outdoor patio and lounge with a fireplace.

The public space is 10 times larger than its current location and the production area is 50 percent larger, according to an Infinity news release.

Matthew Rick, proprietor, winemaker and distiller, said the location allows for business expansion and attracting a wider audience.

“The vast majority of our visitors are locals with only a couple thousand each year being what I would consider tourists from outside the area,” he said in the news release.

While the move does pull the business away from downtown, he said the new building best fit Infinity’s needs and is easily accessible from Interstate 94.

Tasting lounge hours in the new location will be noon to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 11 a.m. to midnight on Fridays and Saturdays, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays.

Infinity’s final day in its current location in Banbury Place will be Saturday, July 2.

Chamber wants lunchtime speakers

The Eau Claire Area Chamber of Commerce is seeking proposals for speakers who want to make a presentation during monthly lunch seminars hosted by the business organization.

Lunch Learn seminars are on the last Tuesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the chamber office, 101 N. Farwell St.

Seminars have been on a variety of topics including human resources, leadership, customer service, marketing and management.

An online form for seminar proposals can be found at tinyurl.com/​h2rup7n.

For more information, contact Becky Seelen by email at seelen@eauclairechamber.org or call 715-858-0615.

Short Takes

• LAKE HALLIE — Green Oasis has added window cleaning to its array of services that already includes lawn care, landscaping, irrigation and a garden center.

• NEW RICHMOND — RCU dedicated the community room at the credit union’s 355 S. Knowles Ave. office in honor of a family of local attorneys who were instrumental in growing New Richmond’s banks.

Starting with patriarch W.T. Doar in the early 20th century and then sons Tom and John, the family has been part of the Bank of New Richmond and SC Banco.

• MANITOWOC — The Independent Community Bankers Association named Investors Community Bank in the top 25 U.S. banks in its annual “Best of the Best” list.

The bank, which has a loan office in Eau Claire, was recognized in the category for banks with assets of $500 million to $1 billion.

• Travel website TripAdvisor gave a Certificate of Excellence Award to the Hampton Inn Eau Claire, 2622 Craig Road.

The award is based off of receiving a large amount of positive customer reviews posted to the website.

• Two longtime members of Western Wisconsin’s SCORE chapter, an Eau Claire-based group of business mentors, were recently honored with the highest award given by the nationwide organization.

Alvin and Barbara Rolland, who each have more than 30 years experience of mentoring, received the SCORE Platinum Award at the local chapter’s June 20 meeting.

• The Eau Claire branch of Baird Private Wealth Management, 4112 Oakwood Hills Parkway, donated $2,500 earlier this month to the Boys and Girls Club of the Greater Chippewa Valley.

The funds came from the branch winning Baird’s Small Branch of the Year Award, the second time the Eau Claire office has won that distinction.

• MADISON—The Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. recently named Coleman Peiffer as its business and investment attraction director.

Peiffer previously served as a business development manager at the WEDC and prior to that, he worked as a senior planner for the North Central Regional Planning Commission.

From staff reports

Article source: http://www.leadertelegram.com/Business/Local-Business/2016/06/26/Briefcase-6-26-16.html

Write to Know

GIVEAWAYS

 

VINTAGE POSTCARDS: Bermuda postcard collection from 1913: 85 cards, never written upon, mounted in hard-bound album. Free to first post-card collector to phone 508-548-2221.

A.B., Falmouth

 

CATHETERS: Twelve boxes (30 each) of male catheters (16 in./40 cm 4.7-mm) from Rochester Medical Corp. Must pick up in Harwich. Call 774-237-9272.

S.C., Harwich

 

TV: I have a 34-inch, flat screen, Panasonic TV with excellent picture, older model. Bought at Nantucket Sound in Hyannis. Very heavy. Please call 508-280-5035. 

M.C., Hyannis

 

BASKETBALL HOOP: Free standard-size basketball net on stand in good condition. Would need to pick up. Please call 508-728-9778. 

D.P., Mashpee

 

PIANO: Chris Everett piano in very good condition, except left front leg cracked from previous move. You pick up. Call Jo-Anne, at 508-778-7929, and leave a message. 

J.Y., Hyannisport 

 

SAILBOATS: I have two Snark sailboats to give away. Complete and usable, but need cosmetic work. You must pick up. Call: 508-896-9054. 

D.M., Brewster

 

Article source: http://www.capecodtimes.com/article/20160626/ENTERTAINMENTLIFE/160629671

Landscaping ideas draw crowds

Local green thumbs are on display this weekend as part of a self-guided tour of gardens across Chatham-Kent.

The Zonta Club of Chatham-Kent is hosting its third-annual Garden and Pond Tour on Saturday and Sunday.

Ticket holders are welcomed to enjoy an expanded version of the this year, featuring 10 gardens. Visitors can view beautiful styles of landscaping, waterscaping and horticulture.

There are also local artists presenting a variety of artwork and musical performances.

Participants can treat themselves to tea and home-baked goodies at a complementary tea party.

Proceeds from the event will help women in the community through Zonta’s ongoing projects, including assistance to All for Kids, the Chatham Kent Women’s Centre and the Chatham-Kent Sexual Assault Crisis Centre.

Visitors must first purchase tickets from one of the following locations:

  • The Glasshouse, 56 Creek Rd.
  • Ross’ Nurserymen, 355 Indian Creek Rd. E.
  • Rubies, 661 Grand Ave. E.
  • Syd Kemsley Florist, 381 Grand Ave. W.
  • Montage Hair Care, 35 Thames St.
  • Rexall, 426 St. Clair St.
  • Flowerbed Greenhouses, 9110 Talbot Trail, Blenheim

The tours run from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.

Tickets are $20. Cash only.

For more information, find “Zonta Garden Tour” on Facebook or visit zontachathamkent.org.

Article source: http://www.chathamdailynews.ca/2016/06/25/landscaping-ideas-draw-crowds

Inside New Jersey landscape design

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Naturally repel mosquitoes and other pests by planting these flowers and herbs in your garden.

There’s something to be said for growing a garden of your own. Over time, you can turn what was once a destitute pile of dirt into a picturesque compilation of flowers and trees. And the credit is all yours.

For those who lack the green thumb and long for the instant gratification of a beautiful garden, the starting price of $2,000 for professional landscape design is well worth it. But that only covers the basics.

Landscape architecture is a multi-step process that creates elaborate designs that vary from the planting of a few trees to the full-on installation of a patio, lighting system, outdoor kitchen and accompanying gardens that can take from days to years. While some may prefer getting down in the dirt and gardening themselves, others prefer the less time-consuming option of hiring a professional landscaper.


Go into your local garden store and ask: "Where are the native plants?"



“Hon, can you water the bougainvillea?” asked my wife, Karen.

“Sure.”

I opened the shower door and pulled out the blue bucket. It was half-full with water collected while waiting for the shower to get hot.

Like Jack in the nursery rhyme, I fetched the pail of water and climbed up to the terrace of our three-level condo and shared the precious resource on the drought-tolerant, heat-loving, red bougainvillea.

It’s year five of the drought and I’m reminded of it everyday. Watering our terrace plants with re-captured water. Leaving a rain barrel out during storms. Attaching low-flow nozzles to the faucets in the bathrooms and kitchen.

Credit the media with an onslaught of stories about lowered precipitation levels. Also credit goes to the State Water Resources Control Board for their active conservation plans. But turn on the TV and you’ll see shiny green lawn commercials and guys fighting over which herbicide to use or who’s got a bigger mower?

Get this product for your lawn and you’ll be a man. Puhleease. Can we grow up?

I walked into an Orchard Supply Hardware here, in drought-aware Southern California, and was hit with displays of colorful plants that require lots of water. Hanging pots of petunias, etc. Way in the back was a bougainvillea that my wife and I wanted as a dry-weather, sun-tolerant species. These were hard to find. The store had very, very few displays of native plants. If they did, they were off to the side. Pushed to the back.

Judging from the TV commercials and the displays in the commercial home improvement stores, you’d never know we were in the thick of a drought. You would not know that California, and many other parts of the West, are struggling to move enough water for fish, trees and people. Or that heat records keep on breaking.

I’m thinking something has to change.

The drought-tolerant plants need to fight for the eye-level display shelves. Tags saying “native Southern California plant” need to be front and center at all garden and home improvement stores. But sadly, they aren’t.

One pleasant exception was Armstrong Nurseries. They’re actually holding classes on growing plants that need less water. Here are just a few offered at all their stores next month:

• Saturday, July 9 at 9 a.m. “Water-wise Plants for California Gardens.” Armstrong Garden Centers plant experts will display and discuss the best low-water plants for California’s diverse climate. There are many colorful choices available to plant.

• Saturday, July 23 at 9 a.m. “Growing Cacti Succulents.” Easy-care succulents and cacti love the heat and are water-wise.

It’s great that some stores truly get it. They are training customers how to switch to the new drier, hotter Southern California environment. The new normal. They are truly teaching people how to have a green thumb.

What is so astounding is the lip service other home improvement stores give to native plants. There are boatloads of colorful, flowering native flora in the Southern California landscape. Surely plant companies can grow these and put them in pots and sell them?

Take a hike along the newly opened Fish Canyon Trail. Nowhere have I seen a more dazzling display of native plants. The phacelia varieties are many, as are the thistle (lavender is my favorite), the monkey flower and the different hues of lemonadeberry and gooseberry.

You like yellow? It’s my favorite color. Plant tall sunflowers that swing in the breeze like a dancer in slow motion. Or everyone’s favorite yellow, the Matilija poppy, which someone described to me as a plant with a fried egg on top.

Don’t forget fiery reds and pulsating purples. I’m talking about lupines and scarlet larkspur that dominate the canyon through July. Sell those. Buy those for your home landscaping or terrace plants.

My dream is to walk into a garden store and see these magnificent painted ladies on the eye-level shelves. They’re tried and tested in nature’s backyard. One that’s hotter and drier every year.

Follow Steve Scauzillo on Twitter @stevscaz/twitter.com or email him at steve.scauzillo@langnews.com.

Article source: http://www.sgvtribune.com/lifestyle/20160625/go-into-your-local-garden-store-and-ask-where-are-the-native-plants

Gardening tips for trees, lawns, flowers and veggies

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Article source: http://www.shelbystar.com/news/20160625/gardening-tips-for-trees-lawns-flowers-and-veggies

Armstrong Garden Centers Shares Top 10 Firescaping Tips for Homeowners

June 24th, 2016 by Monrovia Weekly

 

Simple preventative lawn care can be the difference between a protected property and a scorched one. – Courtesy photo

 

Firescaping Protects Yards, Homes, and Even Lives

With the arrival of extreme heat and soaring temperatures, Armstrong Garden Centers reminds Californians that wildfires can spark and rage out of control in the blink of an eye, so preparedness is the key to safety. Consumers can protect their yards, homes, and loved ones with proper precautions.

Especially in drought-ridden years like the recent ones we have been experiencing, the fire risk in Southern California is high. Not all wildfires can be prevented, but we can all certainly help deter wildfires from our homes and do our best to keep everyone safe. Simple preventative lawn care can be the difference between a protected property and a scorched one.

“We want to help ensure the safety of homeowners and their homes, especially those living in high-risk areas,” said Gary Jones, Armstrong Garden Centers Chief Horticulturist. “While no plant is fireproof, simple firescaping can be the solution, whether it’s choosing plants with fire retardant abilities, knowing proper defensible landscape maintenance or keeping irrigation systems in excellent shape.”

Armstrong Garden Centers provides these firescaping tips to help homeowners safeguard their homes by creating and maintaining a fire-resistant landscape:

  1. Know your plants and research their fire retardant abilities.
  2. Replace flammable trees and shrubs with fire-resistant varieties.
  3. Remove any dead, diseased or dying trees or shrubs.
  4. Create a wide “firebreak” around your home by removing brush and dried grass from the perimeter of your property.
  5. Dense brush means more fire fuel. Keep shrubs and trees thinned out, remove skirts from palms.
  6. Keep irrigation systems in working order and check regularly for adequate coverage.
  7. Eliminate overhanging branches from driveways that could restrict firetrucks.
  8. Keep turf in good condition, including responsibly watering plants or removing dried grass and replacing with a fire-resistant ground cover.
  9. Feed plants and shrubs with organic fertilizers. This reduces quick, soft growth that often results from high-nitrogen chemical fertilizers.
  10. Keep roofs and gutters free of dead leaves and other debris.

“Vegetation can either lead a fire to a structure or stop it,” said Jones. “Firescaping is one of the most critical steps homeowners can take to prevent property loss and ensure their own safety.”

For more information on firescaping, please visit www.armstronggarden.com.

Article source: http://www.monroviaweekly.com/lifestyle/home-garden/armstrong-garden-centers-shares-top-10-firescaping-tips-for-homeowners/

This week’s gardening tips: bedding plants, petunias, mosquito repellent, peanuts

Remove spentnbsp; flowers from bedding plants, such as marigolds, zinnias, pentas, cosmos, salvia and rudbeckia, to encourage them to continue blooming as long as possible. If you planted petunias this spring, don’t be surprised if they begin to…
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‘What a lovely thing a rose is.’ — Arthur Conan Doyle, author of ‘The Adventure of the Naval Treaty’

GARDEN TIPS

Remove spent  flowers from bedding plants, such as marigolds, zinnias, pentas, cosmos, salvia and rudbeckia, to encourage them to continue blooming as long as possible.

If you planted petunias this spring, don’t be surprised if they begin to look poorly sometime in July. (Some will last until August.) Petunias generally don’t tolerate the intense heat of summers this far south. Pull them up and replace them with more heat-tolerant bedding plants, such as blue daze, celosia, coleus, gaillardia, lantana, ornamental sweet potato, Profusion zinnia, marigold, melampodium, narrow-leaf zinnia, pentas, periwinkle, purslane, salvia, scaevola or torenia.

Gardeners often work outdoors in early morning and late afternoon to avoid the heat, but these also are times when mosquitoes are active. You should always apply an effective mosquito repellent before working in your yard. Remember to reapply as needed, which is likely more often than you think given how much we sweat at this time of year.

Plant a row or two of peanuts in the garden now as early summer crops are pulled up. Shell raw peanuts, and plant about three to four seeds per foot
of row. Water daily until the seeds come up. They will be ready to harvest
in October. Peanuts also make an excellent green manure crop. Just as the
peanut plants come into flower, turn them under. They will enrich the soil
with nitrogen and organic matter. Allow the bed to sit for a few weeks while the
organic matter decomposes, and you will be ready to plant a fall crop.

Dan Gill is a horticulturist with the LSU AgCenter.

Love to read about gorgeous gardens? Sign up for NOLA.com’s weekly home and garden newsletter, and you’ll get Dan Gill’s latest tips as well as stories about gorgeous local landscapes. It’s easy and free. Just click here. And while you’re at it, head over to the NOLA.com’s New Orleans Homes and Gardens page on Facebook.