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Archives for May 20, 2016

Penda combines stepwells with water mazes for garden design

The design features of Indian stepwells and water mazes are combined in this proposal for a landscaped garden by architecture studio Penda (+ slideshow).

Magic Breeze Landscape Design by Penda

Penda –  a studio with offices in Beijing and Vienna – will create the 8,000-square-metre garden for a residential complex in Hyderabad, India, which is also designed by the team and set to begin construction this summer.

The aim is to create a communal space where residents of the 127 apartments can host friends, walk their dogs or simply spend some quiet time away from their living spaces.

Magic Breeze Landscape Design by Penda

The studio’s design brings together elements of two traditional Indian landscape features: rectangular pools surrounded by steps, and shallow decorative mazes filled with water.


Related story: Penda highlights global water crisis with meadow pathway installation


The stepwells provided the inspiration for a series of tiered planters and benches that frame the different areas of the garden, while the mazes directly informed the strict geometric layout.

Magic Breeze Landscape Design by Penda

“We were always inspired by Indian stairwells,” explained studio founders Chris Precht and Sun Dayong, whose other projects include a vision for a bamboo city and a house modelled on a tree stump.

They continued: “It is very rare to find an architectural typology where function and beauty are so intertwined, and a harmony of human needs and environmental impact is so in balance.”

Magic Breeze Landscape Design by Penda

The raised elements are filled with different plants, including flowers, herbs and grasses. They also incorporate water features, seating areas and cluster of bamboo.

“Based on Indian water mazes, the steps get shifted to create different sets of atmosphere, from private gardens for a stroll in the park to open plazas for larger gatherings,” added the architects.

Magic Breeze Landscape Design by Penda

The layout includes three main routes, suited to different speeds of movement. There is a wide straight path for runners and emergency access, a narrower path for typical walkers, and a more winding trail for dog walkers and casual strollers.

Called Magic Breeze, the project is backed by Indian property developer Pooja Crafted Homes, which is also working with Penda on a tower block in Vijayawada with a customisable facade of hanging gardens and balconies.

Construction work is set to begin later this year.


Project credits:

Client: Pooja Crafted Homes
Architecture: Penda
Design team: Chris Precht, Sun Dayong, Zi Zhi, Xue Bai, Anna Andronova

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Stepwell concept diagram – click for larger image

magic-breeze-landscape-design-penda-hyderabad-india_dezeen_07
Maze concept diagram – click for larger image

magic-breeze-landscape-design-penda-hyderabad-india_dezeen_08
Pathway concept diagram – click for larger image

Magic Breeze Landscape Design by Penda
Detailed plan one – click for larger image

Magic Breeze Landscape Design by Penda
Detailed plan two – click for larger image

Magic Breeze Landscape Design by Penda
Detailed plan three – click for larger image

Magic Breeze Landscape Design by Penda
Detailed plan four – click for larger image



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Article source: http://www.dezeen.com/2016/05/20/magic-breeze-landscape-penda-water-mazes-indian-garden-design/

Residents of Archer City attend first Cleanup Archer City meeting to address ways to help

Approximately 45 residents attended a meeting at the Archer Service Center Monday evening to discuss possibilities of various means to clean up the town of Archer City.  Presenter Joe Aulds showed a power point of problem areas in the town such as drugs, abandoned homes, properties overgrown with weeds, debris, pot holes, junk vehicles, junk in yards and businesses, property in need of painting, etc., just to name a few.  Pastor Jon Curry presented a power point with ideas on ways to bless the City with helping fulfill some of those needs with volunteers. Both reiterated that it is going to take all of us working together with the City to make progress as a town.  

   Time was spent on all the positives that we have going for Archer City at present and both Aulds and Curry agreed that signs of cleanup have already begun with a nice new school and, the sprucing up of the courthouse, a new mural, new landscaping around Wells Fargo Bank and the newly remolded Sonic soon to open. But both agreed there is a long way to go.    

   Cleaning up properties and abandoned homes will help get rid of drugs in Archer City according to Chief Perron, who was present at the meeting.   He told the residents that drug paraphernalia such as needles and rolling papers are often found in these abandoned structures which appear to attract drug users. Chief Perron said that he and Sgt. England make it a practice of checking abandoned homes that have a door or window open, suggesting someone may have been in the home that should not be.  He also said that tall grass and weeds make it difficult to pursue a suspect running from the law.  

   Aulds suggested that people not complain to City Hall, but attend Council meetings.    “What I want to happen tonight is get everyone together on zoning laws, city ordinance violations and show the City that we care about what’s going on. I think they are behind us.  Four council members are here tonight along with the mayor which makes me think they are behind us,” Aulds said.

     Curry said that people genuinely care about one another in Archer City.  He wants to be a part of helping motivate and providing ways for people in the community to better serve and bless Archer City.  “We all have to be part of caring about our community,” Curry said.    “The best way to serve is together.  We have to take action and get involved, get our hands dirty and do some things we don’t necessarily want to do.  Let’s look at what we can do rather than what we cannot do.  This is a great place to live. This is a great place to raise a family.  Partnering together will create movement.  But it has to be together.”

  Curry said that the first steps are to identify the needs, identify every organization in town already working on projects, and to identify those who can be involved. “Let’s get moving and let’s do something,” he said.   

   Aulds and Curry agreed changes won’t happen overnight but that we have to start somewhere and keep moving forward.  

    Aulds posed the following questions to those in attendance.  “Are you part of the City or just passing by?  Are you proud to live here or is it just a place for you to stay? “   

    A five person committee was formed at the end of the meeting, the first step to identifying the needs and how to move forward. Two volunteered to do some research.  Two in attendance donated $500 to the cause.  Ryan Laudermill of Laudermill Properties contacted Aulds the day after the meeting and said he would like to build new homes on some lots to rent or sell after the abandoned homes are removed.

   Aulds was extremely pleased with the response Monday evening.  He said, “I think some were a bit surprised at a few things presented, but everyone agreed:  we the citizens have to work with the city to fix all the problems.  We will accomplish more by doing it this way, plus I think it will bring all of us closer.”    He continued, “I want to thank everyone that came last night, those that shared their concerns and especially those first volunteers.  There will be more.”

   City Manager George Huffman said “I think it is great that the citizens of Archer City, led by Joe Aulds, are taking some interest in cleaning up our town. There are many citizens that cannot take care of their property, physically and/or financially, and they need assistance. The City is required to adhere to strict legal requirements, including legal notices before any work is performed on private property; therefore, the community groups can make a big difference. As for the City, we are rewriting ordinances involving Code Enforcement which will allow us to have the ability to seize substandard houses for demolition.”

   Anyone interested on jumping on board with Cleanup Archer City is invited to do so.  Whether it is donating your time, equipment, expertise, money or ideas, you are urged to contact Joe Aulds or John Curry.  

Article source: http://www.archercountynews.com/news/residents-of-archer-city-attend-first-cleanup-archer-city-meeting/article_fd05d6fa-1df8-11e6-ba49-7bf9011adeb1.html

Ponsonby boundary battle: trees removed to make way for pool, neighbour says

The developer of 9 Stuart St (on the right) is building a lap pool right up against the boundary of David Stillaman’s back yard (left).

The owner of a central Auckland villa says a developer has mowed down mature trees and a retaining wall on his property to make way for a swimming pool.

David Stillaman once had a leafy outlook from his small Ponsonby back yard, and had made it clear to the developer over the back fence that he would not agree to the trees being removed.

“It was a sanctuary up there and I liked it,” he said.

The view from Stillaman’s back yard before the trees and wall were removed.

The 450sqm section behind him at 9 Stuart St sold 18 months ago for $1.4 million, despite its only improvements being a couple of glorified sheds with no bathroom or power.

READ MORE:
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The new owner, Stuart Property Trustees, is building a two-level home with internal access garage, a lap pool and a courtyard.

The view from the back yard at 68 Summer St now.

Wary of what was happening on the site, Stillaman had his property at 68 Summer St surveyed.

It showed that the trees and retaining wall were on the Summer St side, he said.

But the developer at Stuart St had other ideas.

Map showing the location of 68 Summer St and 9 Stuart St in Ponsonby and where the boundaries meet.

“We came home one day, the (survey) pegs were gone, the retaining wall was gone, the trees were gone, the earth bank was gone,” Stillaman said.

His partner was very upset, and he called the digger driver “a few choice words”, he admitted.

Construction is now underway at Stuart St and the lap pool is being built up against Stillaman’s boundary.

He went to the police, Auckland Council and the Surveyor General but was told it was a civil matter meaning he would have to go to the High Court.

He could not afford court action, but was going to the disputes tribunal to seek landscaping costs from Stuart Property Trustees, he said.

Asked if there could have been a misunderstanding about where the boundary lay, Stillaman answered: “Absolutely not.”

However, the developer and construction firm is adamant the trees and retaining wall were on the 9 Stuart St side.

“The owners of 68 Summer St had built up soil against the dividing wall and fence to a height of approximately one metre and allowed vegetation to grow on the soil,” planning and consents manager for PHI Construction, David Living, said in a statement.

“Once earthworks had begun near the boundary it was found that the previous fence and wall foundations could not be safely removed without also removing the encroaching soil and vegetation.

“We have offered, at our cost, to landscape the land on the 68 Summer st side … To date the owners have not been willing to engage with us.”

The offer remained open, Living said.


 – Stuff.co.nz

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Article source: http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/80203758/ponsonby-boundary-battle-trees-removed-to-make-way-for-pool-neighbour-says

8 Hacks for Learning to Love (or at Least Like) to Exercise

There was a chunk of my life when exercise was not at all on my day-planner. I secretly envied the jocks on school sports teams being pushed by their coaches while training. I felt I had no discipline. I had poor sleeping and eating habits. I was easily humiliated and developed fear of failure. This fear was not without good reason. While I was coordinated enough to take dance lessons for years and do calisthenic-type exercises, I was clueless on how to hit a ball in a desired direction and failed to catch most of the ones coming fast at my face. I had no “natural talent” for ball sports and no energy to get up early for 6 am training to learn other sports. I was pissed at the world and my family, so instead of pursuing my secret desire to be athletic and active, I was swept up by the anger and energy of punk rock music. Jocks and punk rock don’t mix – conformity and nonconformity. I chose staying out all night, hanging out at dingy rock clubs until the wee hours, drinking sweet cocktails and, eating junk food, instead of joining the track and field team.
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Shortly after college, I knew this had to change. I felt like a sloth – and not like one of those cute ones on YouTube.
I made a resolution to get active and fit and, stay that way.

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jill-s-brown/8-hacks-for-learning-to-l_b_10039946.html

Community Day Festival at Schedel Gardens Successful

Ila Stephens, 85, of Port Clinton, passed away, Tuesday, May…

Article source: http://thebeacon.net/beacon-news/news-around-ottawa-county/item/10043-community-day-festival-at-schedel-gardens-successful

‘Deer doctor’ to visit Ann Arbor for free seminar on deer-proofing gardens

ANN ARBOR, MI — Has your garden become a salad bar for deer? If so, there’s a free seminar you might want to attend.

Sandy Baker, known as the “deer doctor” for her work helping communities with deer-related challenges, will be visiting Ann Arbor’s Traverwood Branch Library on Saturday, June 4, to talk about how to deer-proof gardens.

From 10:30 to noon, she’ll be presenting tips, including a customizable five-step strategy to keep plants protected.

A lifelong organic gardener and past retail greenhouse/nursery owner, Baker has been instructing and consulting on deer-proofing gardens since the 1990s and has co-authored several articles. She is the author of the guidebook “How to Deer-Proof Your Garden in Five Easy Steps.”

Sandy Baker, a.k.a. the “deer doctor,” will be visiting Ann Arbor on June 4 for a free seminar on how to deer-proof gardens. Baker presents deer-proofing seminars, educational programs and backyard consultations in her capacity as consultant to the Humane Society of the United States. The Humane Society of Huron Valley is hosting her visit.

“We have a lot to learn as a community about how to co-exist peacefully with wildlife,” Tanya Hilgendorf, HSHV president and CEO, said in a news release.

“There are many tools at our disposal without resorting to guns. As they say, ‘An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.’ “

The City Council voted this week to budget money for a second annual deer cull next winter, while continuing to explore nonlethal methods.

Sharpshooters hired by the city killed 63 deer in 14 city parks and nature areas during the city’s first cull in January and February. The cull proved to be hugely controversial, prompting several protests and lawsuits against the city, while the Humane Society of Huron Valley launched a “Stop the Shoot” campaign that’s still visible in the form of yard signs dotting lawns around the city.

A recent online survey conducted by the city showed 54.4 percent support — out of 2,226 responses — for continuing lethal methods to reduce the deer population in Ann Arbor, while 45.3 percent are opposed.

A larger majority — 61.4 percent — support implementing nonlethal methods such as contraceptives or sterilization to reduce the deer population if Michigan Department of Natural Resources approval can be obtained.

The city’s stated goal is to reduce the deer population in order to reduce negative deer-human interactions, such as complaints about damage to gardens and landscaping, and to support biological diversity in nature areas.

About 900 recent survey respondents — a little over 40 percent — reported having some level of deer damage to landscapes and garden plants in the last few years. Asked if they’ve tried measures to prevent damage, such as using deer-resistant plants or repellents, nearly 700 said they had not.

The Humane Society of Huron Valley believes the best way to address residents’ concerns about damage to landscapes and garden plants is through educating residents and using site-specific mitigation efforts.

Following the free workshop, Baker will be visiting the Ann Arbor Hills neighborhood to give site-specific advice.

“Our goal is to help,” Hilgendorf said. “The push for the cull came from frustrated gardeners. With better education and strategy, we can help those who are experiencing frustration, prevent these frustrations and save both taxpayer money and community heartache.”

City officials believe a combination of approaches — both lethal and nonlethal — are the way to address issues with deer in Ann Arbor. The city is budgeting $145,000 for deer management efforts in the upcoming fiscal year.

“Just by virtue of biology, this issue is increasing in magnitude,” Council Member Kirk Westphal, D-2nd Ward, said this week.

“And every year, just by definition, it is getting more expensive to manage the herd, not even speaking to the long-term ecological damage to our natural areas that may be far beyond the cost of culling at this point.”

Council Member Julie Grand, D-3rd Ward, said last year culling won’t eliminate all deer in the city, so residents should adjust their expectations.

“If you choose to live next to a wooded area near the Huron River, I think you should expect to make certain sacrifices in terms of your gardening and landscaping,” Grand said. “I’d like us to get to a point where we can measure that deer-resistant plants work, but not to where one can plant what’s essentially a salad bar for the deer and expect that if you live near the river they’re not going to come visit you.”

The gardening workshop is free and open to the public, though reservations are recommended as space is limited.

For more information, go to hshv.org/gardenwithdeer.

The city of Ann Arbor’s deer management webpage also points to resources for how to protect landscapes and garden plants from deer and rabbit damage.

Ryan Stanton covers the city beat for The Ann Arbor News. Reach him at ryanstanton@mlive.com.

Article source: http://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/index.ssf/2016/05/deer_doctor_to_visit_ann_arbor.html

Co-op Wars: Do You Dare Walk on the Grass?

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Article source: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/22/realestate/co-op-wars-do-you-dare-walk-on-the-grass.html

Gardening guru to offer tips at Greenmount Heritage Fair

TAKE a step back in time while picking up some tips to brighten your garden’s future at the Greenmount Heritage Fair.

ABC gardening guru Tom Wyatt will be attending the fair at the picturesque Greenmount Homestead on May 29.

The popular presenter will be providing gardening tips in morning and afternoon sessions from the homestead’s vegetable garden.  

Wyatt is best known for his talkback gardening program on ABC radio during which residents can call in for advice to solve their gardening woes. He is also an author.

Other fair attractions include horse and carriage rides, hands-on art activities, quality local crafts and produce stalls, billycart racing, whip-cracking demonstrations, a heritage-themed fashion parade, Devonshire teas, live music and vintage working machinery.

Portrait sketch artist Adriaan Vanderlught will also be at the fair, so keep some space in your schedule to sit for a portrait.

To ensure a hassle-free experience, make sure you take advantage of the park and ride operated by PCYC Mackay and running from Kellys Road in Walkerston.

There will be three 25-seater buses and one seven-seater bus running from 8.30am to 3pm.

The ride takes less than 10 minutes and will only cost you a gold coin donation for PCYC.

SES volunteers will be directing traffic at the Kellys Road parking space and Walkerston Rotary Club members will be directing parking at the fairgrounds.  Please obey their instructions. 

The theme of this year’s Fashions of the Fair is sporting attire through the decades and visitors are encouraged to dress up for the day.

Article source: http://www.dailymercury.com.au/news/gardening-guru-offer-tips-greenmount-heritage-fair/3029919/

Garden Tips: What to hold off on planting

IS LOOKING AT OUR GARDENING FORECAST. MALLORY: GOO MORNING. NURSERY. TALKING WITH ONE OF THE OWNERS. AND SET OF TALKING ABOUT THE THINGS YOU CANNOT DO, THINGS WE CAN PLANT. THESE ARE COLD CROPS, BROCCOLI, CAULIFLOWER, LETTUCE, CABBAGE. YOU CAN PUT THOSE OUTSIDE NOW AND START THEM. TOMATOES, PEPPERS. EV THOUGH THEY ARE IN GREENHOUSES, THEY SHOULD NOT BE PLANTED OUTSIDE UNLESS THEY ARE PROTECTED. ON THE OTHER HAND, THINGS LIKE FROM SEED. DIRECTLY OUTSIDE. MALLORY: YOU CAN DO THAT NOW? I WOULD WAIT UNTIL THE DANGER FROST IS GONE. FLOWERS, WE HAVE BU JUNIORS, PANSY — PLATOON YEARS PANSIES, VIOLETS. THEY CAN BE PLANTED NOW. HAND, MOST OF THE THEY ARE AVAILABLE, YOU CAN BUY THEM, THEY ARE GREAT AT SOME OF THE DISCOUNT STORES BUT THEY WILL FREEZE SO WAIT A GOOD TWO OR THREE WEEKS BEFORE YOU PLANT THEM. MALLOR COULD YOU BUY THEM AND LEAVE THEM INSIDE FOR A WHILE? EXACTLY, NEAR AN OPEN WINDOW WHERE THERE WAS LIGHT AND DO NOT LET THEM DRY OUT TOO MUCH. AND YOU COULD DO THE SAME WITH TOMATOES. MALLORY: VERY INFORMATIVE, SOME

Article source: http://www.wmtw.com/weather/garden-tips-what-to-hold-off-on-planting/39372188