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Archives for April 13, 2016

Treasure Valley gardening events: Growing roses, water-wise planting, growing tomatoes, and more

Saturday, April 16

How to Grow Roses: 10 a.m. at FarWest Landscape and Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Free. 853-4000.

Get Drought Smart: Design and Plant Now with Natives and Water-wise Plants: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Designers will guide you through the process of creating a sustainable garden to fit your gardens needs. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, April 23

Grow Tasty Tomatoes: 10 a.m. at FarWest Landscape and Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Free. 853-4000.

Foodscaping: Innovative Ways to Grow Edibles: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Discover ways to integrate your edibles within the existing garden to maximize your space. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Wednesday, April 27

Landscape Design: 6 p.m. at FarWest Landscape and Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Free. 853-4000.

Saturday, April 30

How to Grow and Use Herbs: 10 a.m. at FarWest Landscape and Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Free. 853-4000.

Container Garden Drama: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Designers will guide you on the best practices to create a seasonal container for your patio or porch. Bring your ideas and containers. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, May 7

Plant sale: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2201 Woodlawn Ave., Boise. 615-1505.

Vintage Vogue: Roses, Peonies and Hydrangeas: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Learn how to design with David Austin roses, peonies and hydrangeas in your garden. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, May 14

Moveable Feast: Growing Edibles in Containers: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Discover how you can create colorful and aromatic edible container gardens you will enjoy all season long. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, May 21

Growing Up: Trellis and Vines: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Discover how trellis and vines can be utilized to hide areas or create ambiance in your garden space. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, May 28

Art in the Garden: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Discover how to utilize garden art to reflect your garden style and create a focal point in your garden space. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, June 11

Idaho Rose Show: Noon to 5 p.m. at The Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Boise. Presented by Idaho Rose Society. Free. 440-7826.

Sunday, June 12

Garden Tour: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Boise. Private gardens found in the historic Collister area of Boise’s North End. Benefit for the Idaho Botanical Garden. $25 general, $20 IBG members. 343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Article source: http://www.idahostatesman.com/living/home-garden/article71598057.html

How to design the perfect vegetable garden for any space

With winter just a memory in the northern hemisphere, and spring in full swing, it’s time to think about your summer vegetable garden. Whether you’re planting your first-ever vegetable garden or you’re an old hand looking for some new design ideas to spruce up your landscape, you don’t have to be stuck with a basic rectangle of dirt in your yard. These design ideas will give you inspiration and help you create the perfect garden for any space – even if you don’t have a yard.


Vegetable Garden design ideas, vegetable gardening, vegetable garden design, vertical gardening, vertical vegetable garden, hydroponic garden, keyhole garden, floral vegetable garden, indoor vegetable garden

Vertical Gardens

If you lack acreage to grow all the crops you’re dreaming of, try growing your veggies vertically instead. A sturdy, creative trellis can support upward growth of vining cucumbers, small squash, peas, beans and tomatoes, leaving you more space on the ground for additional plants. Try ones that can tolerate a little shade, like summer lettuces and long-season carrots. You can also try hanging planters on a sunny wall or fence to grow a green wall of herbs or strawberries.

Keyhole Gardens

Keyhole gardens were originally designed to help African farmers maintain moisture and nutrients in arid conditions, but this design has a lot of advantages for city slickers as well. Raised beds allow you to add friable, sandy loam and avoid any soil contamination in an urban yard, while the center well provides you with a compost pile. It’s a great way to start gardening in a more sustainable way with natural fertilizer and less water.

Indoor Hydroponics

Another great option for those without a lot of arable land to work with are hydroponic gardens. You can usually outfit your basement with bright fluorescent grow lights, some fans for air circulation and good irrigation to grow almost anything indoors. Cool-weather plants like salad greens and leafy herbs are the easiest for beginners, but even tomatoes can be grown this way all winter long if you take care to regulate the temperature.

Floral Borders

You don’t have to be afraid to keep your vegetable garden close to your patio — or even in the front yard! — if you add edible flowers to the mix to keep it pretty. Try planting a floral border around your garden beds for a colorful visual boundary. Marigolds are good for the soil and keep nematodes at bay, while chives and onions can deter some pests. Other bright and flavorful choice choices include nasturtium, borage, chamomile, bee balm, and calendula.

Colorful Produce

Don’t forget the plants themselves! With so many varieties of seed available on the Internet, you can choose yellow beets, purple basil, green tomatoes and red carrots to change things up. Plan your garden layout based on color and plant several colorful, eye-popping varieties to show off nature’s good eats. Your landscape and salad bowl will be so much more interesting this summer.

No matter which garden design trend you choose, you’re sure to have fun out in the sunshine getting your hands in the dirt this summer and improving your yard’s curb appeal. Don’t forget to enjoy all the healthy fruit of your labors by serving up delicious dishes to your friends and family using your harvest!

+ Safe Brand

The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

Article source: http://inhabitat.com/how-to-design-the-perfect-vegetable-garden-for-any-space/

Keller, Haslet, Roanoke and Westlake calendar

Keller

April 13

Chamber ribbon cutting

Opening and ribbon cutting for Sugar-N-Spice at 310 N. Main St. Ste. C-1. Lunch will be served for those in attendance. For more information contact Greg Ballog at 817 908 4586.

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

April 14

Artists Reception

An Evening with the Artists reception featuring the artists of the Birds of a Feather exhibit, at Keller Town Hall, 1100 Bear Creek Pkwy. For information call 817-743-4000 or email publicarts@cityofkeller.com. Thursday.

7-9 p.m.

April 16

Smartscape Plant Sale

City of Keller, a partner with the Texas SmartScape program, hosts a Water Conserving Plant Sale at Home Depot, 2013 Hwy. 377. Offers great deals on select native and adapted plants and a chance to talk to experts to get ideas and tips for landscaping in North Texas. For information visit TxSmartScape.comn. Saturday.

8 a.m.-noon.

April 21

Mt. Gilead Cemetery Association

The Mt. Gilead Cemetery Association holds its annual meeting, open to the public and anyone interested in the preservation of the historic cemetery in Keller, in the conference room of the Keller Public Library, 640 Johnson Rd. Agenda includes election of officers, discussion of the Memorial Day event and an update on the newly-constructed columbarium. For information call MGCA President Darrell Wilde at 214-287-7353. Thursday.

4 p.m.

Roanoke

April 21

Derek Anthony concert

Evenings on Oak Street concert series continues with Derek Anthony, contemporary country performer, at the Austin Street Plaza, 221 N. Oak St. Bring chairs, blankets or some kind of seating. Admission is free. For information call 817-491-2411. Thursday.

7-8 p.m.

Haslet

April 15-16

Wild West Fest

The Haslet Wild West Fest takes place Friday and Saturday at Haslet Community Park, 301 1st St. Live music featuring Le Freak, pro bill riding, kids mutton bustin’, barbecue contest, weiner dog races, vendors, carnival rides, raffles and moore. Admission is $5; ages 10 and under get in free. Parking is free. For information call 817-439-5931.

Friday, 5-10 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

Westlake

Me My Monkey

The MasterWorks concert series continues with Beatles tribute band Me My Monkey at Solana’s Plaza Courtyard, 1301 Solana Blvd., Building 4. Bring a picnic lunch or order from Joe’s Pizza/LaScala will be taking dinner orders in the courtyard and Marriott Solana hotel will have meals to go. Admission is free. For information email Ginger Awtry at gawtry@westlake-tx.org. Thursday.

7-8 p.m.

Submit items to: amurray@kellercitizen.com. Deadline:Noon, Wednesday. Include date, contact. Items subject to editing and printed as space is available.

Article source: http://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/keller-citizen/article71545272.html

Northern-area Community Events Calendar, April 14-20, 2016 – Las Vegas Review

THE WEEK’S BEST BETS

1. Bursting Boundaries — Women of Vision: The free discussion is set from 1 to 3 p.m. April 16 at the Left of Center Art Gallery, 2207 W. Gowan Road. Recently retired 8 News Now anchor Paula Francis plans to speak on recognizing barriers that have been dismantled and what actions are being taken to eradicate the obstacles now and for the future relevant to girls and women. Several other women of vision are scheduled to provide personal experiences. Admission is free. To RSVP, visit burstingboundaries.eventbrite.com or call 702-647-7378.

2. Las Vegas Highland Games: The annual event sponsored by the Las Vegas Celtic Society is set from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 16 and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. April 17 at Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road. Piping and drumming contests, a Highland Dance competition and entertainment are planned, along with food and drink. One-day general admission is $15 for adults, $10 for seniors 60 or older or military personnel with ID and $5 for children 5 to 12. Children 4 or younger are admitted free. Two-day admission is $30, $20 and $10, respectively. Visit lasvegascelticsociety.org.

3.Grand Opening of Lone Mountain Equestrian Park Trail: The event is set from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. April 16 at the new facility at Lone Mountain Park, 4445 N. Jensen St. Clark County Commissioners plan to celebrate the opening of the new equestrian park and trail with a free barbecue, live music and plenty of horses thanks to the local equestrian community. A ribbon-cutting ceremony will christen the opening of a new practice arena, two round pins, a parking area for horse trailers, an equestrian-themed playground for tots and a picnic area. Residents are also invited to explore the new, 2.2-mile, multi-use trail at the base of Lone Mountain. Visit clarkcountynv.gov.

IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD

Neighborhood meeting: The Clark County Commission District C office will host a Neighborhood Meeting at 6 p.m. April 19 at Mountain Crest Community Center, 4701 N. Durango Drive. It is to cover community updates on:

— A presentation from Wood Rogers, the engineering firm that has been awarded a contract by the Regional Transportation Commission to identify options to best apply active complete street transportation principles to Clark County Rural Neighborhood Preservation (RNP) areas. They are anxious to hear your thoughts on what you would value in road amenities such as walking paths, bicycle paths, landscaping, aesthetics and any other ideas for improvements within the county right of way.

— Update on the 215 Beltway road improvement project from Craig Road to Centennial Parkway, including the ramps at Lone Mountain and Ann roads.

— Update on the future road improvements to be performed on Ann Road Between Durango and the 215 beltway; Lone Mountain Road between Teneya Way and the 215 Beltway; and Fort Apache Road from Alexander Road to the bridge at the 215 Beltway.

— Update on the renewal of the interlocal agreement between Clark County and the City of Las Vegas pertaining to zoning consistencies and annexation.

Contact Commission Liaison Sue Baker at 702-455-1900 or at Sue.Baker@ClarkCountyNV.gov.

Film screening: The North Las Vegas Library District is set to host a screening of “Latino Americans,” an award-winning PBS documentary film, followed by a scholarly discussion about Latino American history during the years of 1946-1965, with Rancho High School History Teacher Reuben D’Silva, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. April 14 in the lecture hall, room 513, at Rancho High School, 1900 Searless Ave. Visit pbs.org/latino-americans/en.

Teen Book Chats: The book club is planned from 4 to 5 p.m. April 15 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Children 11 to 17 are invited to chat about their favorite books. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

“All You Need is Love” — A tribute to the music of the Beatles: The concert is set at 8 p.m. April 15 and 16 at the Cannery, 2121 E. Craig Road. Admission is $20 at the door. Visit cannerycasino.com/entertainment.

Cat Daddy/Toto: Free concerts are planned for 7 p.m. April 15 and 16 at the Cannery, 2121 E. Craig Road. Visit cannerycasino.com/entertainment.

Yu Gi Oh: The game is planned from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 16 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Children 11 to 17 are invited to play and hang out with friends. Participants must bring their own cards. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

Annual Spring Rummage Sale: The sale, hosted by the Los Prados Women’s Club, is set from 7 a.m. to noon April 16 at the Los Prados Country Club, 5150 Los Prados Circle. Money collected is donated at the end of the year to various charities in Las Vegas. Call Ann Hull at 702-655-0458.

Spring Fling Fashion Show and Luncheon: The annual fundraiser, hosted by the Catholic Daughters of America Court Elizabeth Ann Seton, is planned for 11:30 a.m. April 16 at the St. Francis De Sales Catholic Church, 1111 Michael Way. Contact Vickie Bentley at 702-646-1323 or Suzanne Dalton at 702-228-2108.

Las Vegas Hawaiian Civic Club: The club’s monthly general membership meeting is planned from noon to 4 p.m. April 17 at the Las Vegas Buddhist Sangha Center, 4110 N. Martin Luther King Drive. Meetings usually start off with a potluck social and involve learning and sharing the Hawaiian culture. Visit lasvegashcc.org/las-vegas-hawaiian-civic-club.html or email contactus@lasvegashcc.org.

Free fiction writing workshop: The workshop with fantasy and sci-fi author Maxwell Alexander Drake is scheduled from 3 to 5 p.m. April 17 and 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. April 18 inside the meeting room at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

The Las Vegas Hawaiian Civic Club: The monthly general membership meeting is planned at noon April 17 at the Las Vegas Buddhist Sangha Center, 4110 N. Martin Luther King Drive. Learn about Hawaiian culture. Visit lasvegashcc.org or email contacts@lasvegashcc.org.

“North East”: The exhibition is planned from noon to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays, April 19 through July 2, at the Left of Center Art Gallery, 2207 W. Gowan Road. The exhibition is set to feature artists who have either grown up in, worked in or have some connection to the northeast area of Las Vegas. The show is slated to feature Las Vegas artists Fawn Douglas, Justin Favela, Anthony Johnson, Ashanti McGee, Jerry Misko, Ras One, Krystal Ramirez, Checko Salgao, Lance Smith, David Veliz and Mikayla Whitmore. Visit leftofcenterart.org.

DIY Craft Club: The club is planned from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. April 20 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Children 6 to 11 are invited to make a craft. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

“2016 Art of the Young Child”: The exhibition is planned during regular campus hours through April 23 inside the College of Southern Nevada Artspace Gallery, 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave., and is set to feature artwork in a variety of media created by students ages 6 months through 6 years in the CSN Early Childhood Education Lab Program. Call 702-651-4146.

Gallery of Clean Energy Inventions: The exhibit of 43 clean electricity generators, 18 advanced self-powered electric vehicle innovations and 10 technical solutions to water shortages is on display at the Alexander Library, 1755 W. Alexander Road, from 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. A student art contest is included. Visit padrak.com/vesperman.

“A Joyful Perspective”: The exhibit by John Trimble is set during regular hours through May 10 inside the art gallery at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Trimble’s acrylic paintings and prints illustrate the various moods and emotions of daily life through the use of amplified color and offer a multicultural perspective on American landscapes and culture. Call 702-507-6100 or visit lvccld.org.

WORTH A DRIVE

Rockabilly Weekend: Viva Las Vegas Rockabilly Weekend, a festival featuring music, a classic car show, burlesque, dancing, tiki pool parties, a pin-up contest, bowling, more than 120 vendors and more, is scheduled April 14-17 at The Orleans, 4500 W. Tropicana Ave. Four-day tickets are $150. Car show-only tickets are $30. Visit vivalasvegas.net.

Pure Aloha Festival: All are invited to explore Hawaiian food, culture and music during the 15th annual festival scheduled from 5 p.m. to midnight April 14 and 15 and noon to midnight April 16 and noon to 10 p.m. April 17 at the Silverton, 3333 Blue Diamond Road. Admission is $8 for adults and $6 for children 5 to 10, military members and seniors 55 or older. The festival is set to host all-ages concerts at 7 p.m. April 15 and 16. Daily concert admission is $34 in advance or $42 at the door. Visit vizzun.com or call 702-664-6468.

“Romeo and Juliet”: Performances are scheduled at 7 p.m. April 14 and 15, 5 p.m. April 16 and 2 p.m. April 17 at the Winchester Cultural Center, 3130 McLeod Drive. Tickets are $7 at the door or at tinyurl.com/wincthe. Visit clarkcountynv.gov or call 702-455-7340.

18b Day: The event is set from 4 to 8 p.m. April 14 at Boulder Plaza, 1047 S. Main St., with live painting by artists from The Arts Factory, Mowgli Art, Eden Gallery, Bona Fide, Opia Gallery, City of the World, Union House, Art Square and Alex Huerta, performances by Molodi and Zosa Pistola, and speakers and updates on what is happening in the Arts District. Attendees can participate in live painting on Guerrilla Kages offered by District Artz. Refreshments are set to be available for sale from food trucks.

Wakeboard: The Empire Collegiate Wakeboard Championships are planned starting at 9 a.m. April 14-17 at Lake Las Vegas, 8 Strada di Villaggio. Visit lakelasvegasevents.com.

“Heathers The Musical”: Performances are scheduled at 8 p.m. April 14-16, 21-23, 28-30 and 5 p.m. April 17 at the Onyx Theatre, 953-16B E. Sahara Ave. Tickets are $25 for general admission and $28 for VIP seating and may be purchased online or at the box office an hour before showtime. Visit onyxtheatre.com or call 702-732-7225.

“Disney’s Beauty and the Beast”: Performances of the Broadway musical are scheduled for 7:30 p.m. April 14-17 and 2 p.m. April 16 and 17 at The Smith Center for the Performing Arts, 361 Symphony Park Ave. Tickets range from $24 to $135. Visit thesmithcenter.com or call 702-749-2012.

Women’s Leadership Council Annual Luncheon Fashion Show: The event is scheduled from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. April 15 at the Champagne Ballroom in the Paris Las Vegas, 3655 Las Vegas Blvd. South. The United Way of Southern Nevada is set to celebrate the Women’s Leadership Council’s impact in the community. Tickets are $153.99. Visit uwsn.org/wlc.

Spring concert: The Henderson Symphony Orchestra plans to perform a free concert at 8 p.m. April 15 at the Henderson Pavilion, 200 S. Green Valley Parkway. Visit hendersonsymphony.org or call 702-907-8863.

Clark County Children’s Festival: The event is set from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 16 at the Winchester Cultural Center, 3130 McLeod Drive. This year’s theme is Children’s Festival of the Arts, and free activities are set to celebrate musical arts, visual arts and performing arts and include dance and music performances, arts and crafts, a variety of animals from Roos-N-More, percussion workshops, carnival games and costumed characters. Vendors with small fees include a rock climbing wall, historic battles, pony rides, and food and drink vendors. Visit clarkcountynv.gov or call 702-455-7340.

UNLVino: The annual event is planned with three events:

— Bubble-Licious from 7 to 10 p.m. April 14 at The Venetian, 3355 Las Vegas Blvd. South, includes champagnes and sparkling wines. Tickets are $100 in advance; $125 at the door.

— Sake Fever from 7 to 10 p.m. April 15 at Red Rock Resort, 11011 W. Charleston Blvd., with sakes, Japanese spirits and cocktails. Tickets are $75 in advance; $100 at the door.

— The Grand Tasting from 7 to 10 p.m. April 16 at Paris Las Vegas, 3655 Las Vegas Blvd. South, with premium beverages, live entertainment and cuisine from UNLV’s culinary students and Las Vegas restaurants. Tickets are $100 in advance; $125 at the door.

Visit UNLVTickets.com.

Fireworks show: Red Rock Resort plans to mark its 10th anniversary with a fireworks show at 9 p.m. April 16 at 11011 W. Charleston Blvd. In addition, a Silent Sundown Savasana is planned to honor the anniversary at 7 p.m. April 21 at the Sandbar pool area. Enjoy free yoga poolside followed by half-priced martinis at Lucky Bar until 9 p.m. Visit redrocksclv.com.

Helen Stewart’s Birthday Celebration: To celebrate the 162nd birthday of the First Lady of Las Vegas, a celebration is planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 16 at the Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Historic Park, 500 E. Washington Ave. Winners of the poetry contest from Helen Stewart’s namesake literary magazine “Helen” are set to be announced, and a poetry reading, tea and birthday cake are planned. Admission is $1 for ages 13 or older; children 12 or younger are admitted free. Email oldfortranger@parks.nv.gov.

“My Fair Lady”: Signature Productions plans performances of the classic musical at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays through April 30 at the Summerlin Library and Performing Arts Center, 1771 Inner Circle Drive. Matinees are planned for 2 p.m. April 16 and 23. Tickets are $30 for adults, $28 for seniors 60 or older and students 13 or older, and $20 for children 6 to 12. A group rate for 20 tickets or more is $25 each. Call 702-878-7529 or visit signatureproductions.net.

Japanese festival: The Kizuna Japanese Society plans to host the free Kizuna Japanese Spring Festival from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 16 in the courtyard of Coldwell Banker Premier Realty, 8290 W. Sahara Ave. Experience Japanese culture with a tea ceremony, flower arrangements, calligraphy, kimonos, Koto music, Taiko drums, origami, Kendama and more. Vendors with Japanese items, toys, collectibles, food and more are planned. Call 702-626-0303 or visit kizunajapanesesociety.org.

Tour de Summerlin: Hundreds of cyclists are expected to participate in the 15th annual Tour de Summerlin April 16 at Downtown Summerlin, 1980 Festival Plaza Drive. The 80-mile ride is set to begin at 7 a.m.; the 60-mile ride at 7:45 a.m.; and the 40-mile ride at 8:30 a.m. The non-competitive event includes the community’s dedicated bike routes as well as open desert roads and benefits the Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Foundation of Nevada. Participants can rent bikes from McGhie’s Ski, Bike Board, 4035 S. Fort Apache Road, by calling 702-252-8077. The registration fee is $85 through April 14 and $95 after April 14.

Las Vegas City of Lights Jazz, Rhythm and Blues Festival: The concerts are scheduled from 1 to 9 p.m. April 16 and 2 to 10 p.m. April 17 at the Clark County Government Center Amphitheater, 500 S. Grand Central Parkway. The event includes vendor booths and live performances by Boney James, Ledisi and Rachelle Ferrell. Tickets are $100 per day. Visit yourjazz.com.

Klip It for Kidz: The eighth annual Klip It for Kidz fundraiser is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 16 in the center park area of Town Square Las Vegas, 6605 Las Vegas Blvd. South. Check-in and registration for pledges and hair donations will be at the Nevada Childhood Cancer Foundation tent. Visit www.nvccf.org or call 702-735-8434.

“Kizzy in a Tizzy (The Endometriosis Play)”: The show by Las Vegas playwright Erica Griffin is planned for 7 p.m. April 16, 17, 21, 23, 24 and 30 at McMullan’s Irish Pub, 4650 W. Tropicana Ave. Donations are accepted to the actors, the company or the Endometriosis Foundation of America and the Endometriosis Association. For tickets, email current.theatrics.lv@gmail.com.

Team Tara Breast Cancer Awareness Mixer: A benefit to help Las Vegas mother of two Tara Adkins fight breast cancer is set to include live performances by The Riflemen and Lawn Mower Death Riders, cocktails, food and a silent auction from 6 to 8 p.m. April 16 at BJ’s Cocktail Lounge, 8075 S. Decatur Blvd. Tickets are $50 for gold sponsors, $100 for silver sponsors and $150 for platinum sponsors. Reserve tickets by email at info@bjslasvegas.com or by calling 702-291-2037.

Mad Hatter Tea Party: The event, benefiting the Cure 4 The Kids Foundation, is set from noon to 4 p.m. April 16 in the Palms Room at the Four Season Hotel, 3960 Las Vegas Blvd. South. It is set to include bottomless mimosas, tea, cakes, petit fours, sandwiches, a balloon artist, characters and a silent auction. Tickets are $150 at survivor.auction-bid.org. Donors who would like to sponsor a childhood cancer survivor to attend the tea party can call Dawn Marie Pavuk at 702-732-0952.

AIDS Walk Las Vegas: The 26th annual Aid for AIDS of Nevada event is planned for 8 a.m. April 17 at Town Square Las Vegas, 6605 Las Vegas Blvd. South. Children and pets are welcome. Penn Teller are set to return as the event grand marshals for the 15th consecutive year. An opening ceremony is planned with appearances and performances from Las Vegas entertainers, artists, politicians and dignitaries. Registration is free, with fundraising incentives. Visit afanlv.org.

The Chef’s Table: The community dinner to benefit the Discovery Children’s Museum is set from 6 to 9 p.m. April 17 at Tivoli Village, 440 S. Rampart Blvd. Guests will be seated outside for a curated dinner from Las Vegas chefs including Johnny Church of Artisanal Foods. Live entertainment and a silent auction are planned. Tickets are $150 at tinyurl.com/jl2w65o.

Girls on the Run Las Vegas 5K Run/Walk: The event is planned for 9 a.m. April 17 at the Kellogg-Zaher Sports Complex, 7901 W. Washington Ave. The race is set to include a pre-event dance party, Selfie Stations, mascot visits and a Refreshment Zone. Registration is $35 for adults and $15 for those 18 or younger, which includes an event T-shirt, a commemorative 5K medal and refreshments from The Coffee Bean Tea Leaf, Rachel’s Kitchen and Crazy Pita, and water and recovery drinks from The Coca-Cola Co. Visit girlsontherunlv.org/race/445-spring-2016-gotr-lv-5k.

Medical cannabis program: Essence Vegas, a marijuana dispensary and resource center, has announced Essence Educates: Wellness Wednesdays, a bi-weekly educational program designed to teach current and potential patients about the medical benefits of cannabis, how it’s produced and proper uses. The classes are planned at 7 p.m. each day at Essence-West, 5765 W. Tropicana Ave., and include: Know the Health Benefits, April 27; and Know your Extraction, May 11. Visit EssenceVegas.com or call 702-901-4581.

New Vista Community Wine Walk: The walk is set from 7 to 10 p.m. May 21 at Town Square Las Vegas, 6605 Las Vegas Blvd. South. Each walk is set to showcase a variety of food and wine throughout Town Square and feature 15 wines for sampling. The cost is $25 per person in advance or $30 the day of the event. Individuals must be 21 or older to attend. Visit winewalklv.com. or call 702-269-5000.

PLAN AHEAD

Centennial Hills Soap Crafters: The workshop is slated from 6 to 7 p.m. April 21 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Adults are invited to learn how to make bath and body products, troubleshoot problems, work on group projects, participate in a soap exchange and win giveaways. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

All Star Friday Nights with In-A-Fect: As part of All Star Friday Nights, In-A-Fect is scheduled to perform from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. April 22 at the Aliante, 7300 Aliante Parkway. The cost is $10. Luxury booths are available for $100 and banquettes for $50. Call 702-600-1625 or visit aliantegaming.com.

Ward 6 Movie in the Park: The free event is planned at 7 p.m. April 22 at Centennial Hills Park Amphitheater, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive. Residents are invited to watch a movie and are encouraged to bring blankets or folding chairs. Call 702-229-6154.

Ward 6 Shredding Event: Participants can have their documents shredded at 10 a.m. April 23 at the Centennial Hills Active Adult Center parking lot, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive. Shredding is limited to five boxes per vehicle. Call 702-229-2524.

Skid Row and Stryper: The concert is set at 8 p.m. April 23 at the Cannery, 2121 E. Craig Road. Tickets start at $22.95. Visit cannerycasino.com/entertainment.

Medicaid assistance: The information workshop is slated at 10 a.m. April 26 at the Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive. Lee Jordan plans to educate participants on Medicaid and offer assistance with applications. Advance registration is required. Call 702-229-1702.

Dia de los Ninos/Dia de los Libros: The story time celebrating children and reading is planned from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. April 27 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive, for ages 6 to 11. Call 702-507-6100.

Jazz Under the Stars with Michael Lington: The concert by the pool is planned for 7 p.m. April 28 at the Aliante, 7300 Aliante Parkway. Tickets start at $23.50. Visit aliantegaming.com.

J.D. Smith Mariachi Band: The performance is scheduled at 6 p.m. April 28 inside the North Las Vegas City Hall Council Chambers, 2250 Las Vegas Blvd. North. Residents are invited to listen to mariachi music with a performance by the Smith Middle School mariachi band. Admission is free. Visit cityofnorthlasvegas.com.

Science Technology Expo: The free exposition is planned from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 29 at the College of Southern Nevada’s Cheyenne campus, 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave. The event plans to promotes science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs that help prepare students for careers in these fields. Visit csn.edu.

All Star Friday Nights with Sons of Soul: As part of All Star Friday Nights, Sons of Soul is scheduled to perform from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. April 29 at the Aliante, 7300 Aliante Parkway. The cost is $10. Luxury booths are available for $100 and banquettes for $50. Call 702-600-1625 or visit aliantegaming.com.

Magic Club: Ages 11 to 17 are invited to practice magic tricks from 4 to 5 p.m. April 29 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Call 702-507-6100 or visit lvccld.org.

Las Vegas Hula Polynesian Dance: The performance is scheduled at 3 p.m. April 30 at the Aliante Library, 2400 W. Deer Springs Way, and at 4:45 p.m. April 30 at the Alexander Library, 1755 W. Alexander Road. Residents are invited to discover the art of Polynesian dance with a performance by Las Vegas Hula. Their dances will cover the islands of Hawaii, Tahiti, Tokelau and New Zealand. Admission is free. Visit cityofnorthlasvegas.com.

Free fiction writing workshop: The workshop with Maxwell Alexander Drake is scheduled from 3 to 5 p.m. May 1 and 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. May 2 inside the meeting room at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

San Gennaro Feast: The Italian food and music festival is planned from 4 to 11 p.m. May 4 and 5, 4 p.m. to midnight May 6, noon to midnight May 7 and noon to 11 p.m. May 8 at the Craig Ranch Regional Park Amphitheater, 628 W. Craig Road. Food, entertainment and carnival rides are planned. A fireworks show is planned on May 8. Visit sangennarofeast.com.

Discover the Philippines: The story time is planned from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. May 4 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Children 6 to 11 are invited to learn about the people and culture of the Philippines. Call 702-507-6100 or visit lvccld.org.

Disneyland Tips and Tricks: The lecture is planned from 6 to 7:30 p.m. May 5 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Call 702-507-6100 or visit lvccld.org.

Let’s Draw the Story!: The story time and activity is planned from 4 to 5 p.m. May 6 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Children 3 to 7 are invited to listen to a story and draw whatever comes to mind. Call 702-507-6100 or visit lvccld.org.

Cows, Goats, and Horses, Oh My!: The event is planned from 4 to 7 p.m. May 6 at Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road. Families are invited to rediscover the historic park and visit barnyard animals, take a guided nature walk and learn about the science of horses in the Old Dairy Barn. Visit scifest.vegas.

Arts and crafts fair: The Sun City Aliante Mother’s Day Arts Crafts Fair is planned from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 6 and 7 at the Sun City Aliante Community Center, 7390 Aliante Parkway. Artwork, baskets, ceramics, pottery, fused glass items, quilted and knitted items, sewing crafts, beading, jewelry, needlework and crocheted items, candles, woodworking products, greeting cards and silk scarves are to be among the items for sale. A raffle will benefit SAFE House, a charity for at-risk children and their mothers. A local animal rescue will have animals on site available for adoption. Admission is free.

Lights — A Tribute to Journey: The concert is set at 8 p.m. May 6 and 7 at the Cannery, 2121 E. Craig Road. Admission is $10 at the door. Visit cannerycasino.com/entertainment.

Eli Young Band: The concert is set for 8 p.m. May 7 at the Aliante, 7300 Aliante Parkway. Tickets start at $49.50. Visit aliantegaming.com or call 702-600-1625.

Introduction to Making Soap: The workshop is slated from 6 to 7 p.m. May 11 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Adults are invited to learn how to make bath and body products. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

LEGO Club: The club is set to meet from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. May 11 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Children 6 to 11 are invited to share stories and books and build projects inspired by those stories. Call 702-507-6100.

Teens Wanted — Preparing for Your First Interview: The workshop is planned from 4 to 5 p.m. May 12 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Youths 11 to 17 are invited to learn how to prepare for interviews. The workshop plans to show teens how to polish their resumes, find job websites, dress appropriately and answer most commonly asked questions during interviews. Call 702-507-6100.

Art exhibit: “Hyperion” by Christopher Tsouras is set to be on display during regular library hours May 12 through June 28 inside the art gallery at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Tsouras’ photographs of stark desert, urban and industrial landscapes from around the Las Vegas Valley are set to be shown. Call 702-507-6100 or visit lvccld.org.

My Design — Captain America and X-Men: The craft is scheduled from 4 to 5 p.m. May 13 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Youths 11 to 17 are invited to represent their fandom by painting their own T-shirt or bag. The library is set to provide the stencils and paint. Call 702-507-6100 or visit lvccld.org.

Mick Adams and The Stones: The concert is set at 8 p.m. May 13 and 14 at the Cannery, 2121 E. Craig Road. Admission is $10 at the door. Visit cannerycasino.com/entertainment.

Ward 6 Movie in the Park: The free event is planned at 7 p.m. May 14 at Centennial Hills Park Amphitheater, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive. Residents are invited to watch a movie and are encouraged to bring blankets or folding chairs. Call 702-229-6154.

“Fit Lives Here” Event Series: The 8K Trail Mix and 5K Road Race are scheduled to start at 8 a.m. May 14 at Skye Canyon Park, 10111 W. Skye Canyon Park Drive. Registration ranges from $25 to $50 and includes a T-shirt and a goodie bag. A 1-mile family fun run or walk is also planned. The 5K and 1-mile races are set to travel through Skye Canyon’s neighborhoods, while the 8K will start on the road and venture onto nearby trails. A portion of proceeds will benefit the Outside Las Vegas Foundation. Visit skyecanyon.com.

GO Mount Charleston Spring Cleaning: Volunteers are needed to help spruce up the mountain before the busy summer season. Groups including a minimum of five people, with at least one group leader older than 18, are invited to gather from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 14 at the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area. Cleaning supplies will be provided. Volunteers will be assigned a litter pickup area in advance and will be sent specific details once registered. Groups will check in at their location between 9:30 and 10 a.m. with the designated site manager. Following the pickup, groups will be treated to a barbecue with live music. Email volunteer@gomtcharleston.com or call Kira West at 702-872-0550.

American Red Cross Blood Drive: The blood drive is scheduled from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. May 16 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Walk-ins welcome. Call 702-522-3986 or visit lvccld.org.

Centennial Hills Soap Crafters: The workshop is slated from 6 to 7 p.m. May 19 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Adults are invited to learn how to make bath and body products, troubleshoot problems, work on group projects, participate in a soap exchange and win giveaways. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

Teen Book Chats: The book club is planned from 4 to 5 p.m. May 20 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Youths 11 to 17 are invited to chat about their favorite books. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

Yu Gi Oh: The game is planned from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 21 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Youths 11 to 17 are invited to play Yu Gi Oh and hang out with friends. Participants must bring their own cards. Call 702-507-6107 or visit lvccld.org.

Richard Elliot: The concert is set for 8 p.m. May 21 at the Aliante, 7300 Aliante Parkway. Tickets start at $32.50.. Visit aliantegaming.com or call 702-600-1625.

Jazz Under the Stars with Lin Rountree: A concert by the pool is planned for 7 p.m. May 26 at the Aliante, 7300 Aliante Parkway. Tickets start at $23.50. Visit aliantegaming.com.

Magic Club: Youths 11 to 17 are invited to practice magic tricks from 4 to 5 p.m. May 27 at the Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive. Call 702-507-6100 or visit lvccld.org.

Kool Summer of Fun Kick-off Festival and Car Show: The free event is set to start at 4 p.m. May 28 at the Cannery, 2121 E. Craig Road. Visit cannerycasino.com/entertainment.

Shelby Shadwell “COMEDIE”: The free exhibition is planned during regular gallery hours through May 28 inside the College of Southern Nevada Fine Arts Gallery, 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave. The exhibition is set to feature large-scale drawings by Shelby Shadwell, University of Wyoming associate professor of drawing. Shadwell’s artwork explores the visual tensions between representation and abstraction. Gallery hours are from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Call 702-651-4146.

ONGOING

Voodoo Band: The concert is scheduled at 9 p.m. Fridays at South Padre at Texas Station, 2101 Texas Star Lane. Admission is free. Guests must be 21 or older. Visit texasstation.sclv.com.

Darren Michaels: The concert is planned for 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays at A-Bar at Texas Station, 2101 Texas Star Lane. Admission is free. Guests must be 21 or older. Visit texasstation.sclv.com.

Yellow Brick Road: The concert is planned for 10 p.m. Saturdays at South Padre at Texas Station, 2101 Texas Star Lane. Admission is free. Guests must be 21 or older. Visit texasstation.sclv.com.

Ride a horse: The horse riding activity is planned from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at Horses4Heroes Community Equestrian Center inside Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road. Rides are $10 per person, and children 2 or younger are admitted free. The ride includes a visit to the barnyard. All other activities, including trail ride classes (part lesson, part trail ride) are by appointment. Trail ride classes are $50 per person. Email events@horses4heroes.org.

Ranch Day Camps: The day camp is set to open during school staff development days at Horses4Heroes Community Equestrian Center inside Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road. Email camps@horses4heroes.org.

Article source: http://www.reviewjournal.com/view/north/northern-area-community-events-calendar-april-14-20-2016

Germantown remodeled home tour set for April 24



By Jane Roberts of The Commercial Appeal

The Germantown Tour of Remodeled Homes and Landscapes will be 2 to 5 p.m. April 24, rain or shine.

The free event features homes that have recently undergone renovation or re-landscaping. The purpose is to encourage homeowners to upgrade and enhance their homes and improve neighborhoods.

With both simple renovations and, in some cases, extensive remodeling, there is something for everyone to see and study for ideas. Included in this year’s tour is a home that was built at the beginning of the 20th Century and one with aging in mind. Contractors will be on site at some locations to answer questions.

The homes in this year’s tour include the Grace and Frank Uhlhorn home, 8559 Dogwood Road; the Cynthia and Daniel Freeman home, 2876 Carnton Drive; the Marlene and Merle Gardner home, 2608 Holly Springs Drive; and Mary Jo and Jay Tingle home, 2585 Regents Walk.

A list of renovation descriptions and directions is available at each home during the tour and at Germantown Community Library, Germantown Athletic Club, City Hall and online at Germantown-TN.gov/HomeTour.

Germantown Neighborhood Preservation Commission and the city of Germantown are presenting the event.

Sponsors include the West Tennessee Home Builders Association Remodelers Council, attorney Erin S. Wadlington, Crye Leike Realtor Allyson Avera, Holliday Flowers and Events, Re/Max Realtor Paige Michael, Lowes and EBOX/EPLEX.

For more information, contact Sherrye Harris Clark at 757-7203 or saharris@Germantown-TN.gov.

Jane Roberts thumbnail

Article source: http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/suburbs/germantown/germantown-remodeled-home-tour-set-for-april-24-304d5d2d-0d25-6c90-e053-0100007fba78-375606391.html

Commitment to Community: How HPU has Become High Point’s University

This story is featured in the Winter 2016 edition of the HPU Magazine. In honor of National Volunteer Week April 10-16, discover how HPU’s commitment to community service truly makes it High Point’s University.


 

They feed the hungry and find new ways to grow and distribute food in their city. They open books and share stories with refugee children who are learning to speak a new language.

With paint and elbow grease, they brighten community spaces.

And they do it all with a badge of purple on their back.

When Dr. Nido Qubein became president at High Point University, he created a transformational vision not only for HPU, but for what the campus could mean to its community.

In the last decade, HPU has transformed in significant ways, including its commitment to engaging students in service that enhances their education and the city they call home.

“We’re under the leadership of someone who took this presidency and transformed this university because of a commitment to the city it’s in,” says Dr. Joseph Blosser, the Robert G. Culp Jr. director of service learning. “Dr. Qubein cares about High Point and knows the university can be an engine for the city.”

 


465 mil economic impact


100,000+ volunteer hours


230,000 annual united way giving


2.3 mil economic value


165 business partners

Learning through Service

One of the largest indicators of the university’s renewed commitment to community-based programs is Qubein’s three-year appointment as chairman of the N.C. Campus Compact.

Campus Compact is a national organization headquartered in Boston that builds the capacity of colleges and universities to produce civically-engaged graduates and strengthen communities. In North Carolina, 30 colleges and universities are members.

Qubein’s leadership of the N.C. chapter reflects the infrastructure that’s been built at HPU to support and celebrate the value of service.

When Blosser arrived to serve as the university’s first full-time director of service learning in 2011, there were some professors and groups on campus focused on giving back in their own ways. But they weren’t united in a common cause. He advocated for service learning courses to be offered through HPU’s four-credit-hour model. Just as classes were already utilizing the fourth hour, or 25 percent of the course, for experiential learning such as undergraduate research, so, too, could professors use the fourth hour for service. And not only service, but service that supplemented classroom content. Thus service learning classes were born and students began to give back in ways relevant to their majors.

Exercise science majors taught immigrants how to cook healthy meals with American food. A history course led students to create a digital, historical archive for an African American community in the city.

Cara Kozma bw“Our students made connections between the literature they read on globalization and the cultural experiences they had in the community,” said Dr. Cara Kozma, assistant professor of English. At the nearby Macedonia Family Resource Center, her English students tutored refugee children and families from Sudan, Pakistan and Iraq.

University-sponsored grants were offered to faculty to receive training on leading service learning courses. And Blosser established two major programs on campus — AmeriCorps VISTAs and Bonner Leaders — programs that have spiked service hours.

In a few short years, the university’s annual hours of service soared from 30,000 to 100,000.

 

A Day On, Not Off

To understand the magnitude of those service hours, consider the one day each year when the impact of HPU’s service is amplified.

It happens on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and though classes are canceled, students and community members unite for “A Day On, Not Off.”

In 2014, 400 HPU family members took to the community on this day and completed dozens of service projects totaling 1,200 hours of service.

Beta Theta Pi Helping High Point bwIn 2015 and 2016, those numbers increased to 600 students, faculty and staff completing nearly 1,500 hours of service, 35 projects, raising thousands of dollars and packing thousands of meals.

This single day is held in honor of the legacy of the late King, and it shows that in a short amount of time, change can be made and relationships can be built.

“This day is always a great way to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,” said 2015 graduate Kevin Garrity, while working on the landscaping team at West End Ministries. “He was concerned with forwarding the human race, and when you give back to any group, it honors what he did and his memory.”

The event is organized by students, including the VISTAs and Bonners. For some, it is an extension of service. For others, it is their first introduction to serving in the community.

But this single day has made service highly visible and highly accessible to anyone, and that’s the point.

“There’s no doubt in my mind the future of High Point will continue to be shaped by the growth and generosity of HPU,” says Bobby Smith, president of United Way of Greater High Point. “It touches every single resident in the greater High Point area.”

 

Bringing Something to the Table

One of the most concentrated areas of service in the city is the elimination of food deserts — neighborhoods without access to fresh, healthy, affordable food.

A national report identified several such neighborhoods in High Point this year. In response, community leaders formed a Greater High Point Food Alliance to tackle the challenges. The alliance leaders included Blosser and the VISTAs, who quickly dedicated themselves to creating solutions that would alleviate problems.

A strategic communication class led by professor Shannon Campbell had a unique approach. They wanted to use their talents in marketing and communications to benefit the cause. So they did what strategic marketing professionals do best — they planned and promoted a major community event where vital information could be shared.

Pennybyrn bwIt was called the Food Summit and it was held, with hundreds in attendance, at the High Point University Community Center for two days. Leaders gathered there and penned ideas that could serve as solutions — community gardens, mobile farmer’s markets and healthy cooking classes, to name a few.

After those communication students had done their part in successfully executing this event, they planned and executed another. This time, it was a cooking demonstration featuring well-known local restaurant chefs. It begged the questions: Can healthy meals be cooked quickly and at low cost? Can they be cooked using the items those in need receive from food pantries?

The chefs took the challenge to task and cooked meals with simple ingredients, which helped low-income neighbors understand better ways to eat healthy. It also made leaders of the city realize how challenging it can be to assemble a healthy dinner with items that are given away at pantries.

In the end, they successfully brought people together again to consider hunger and how to improve it.

Their efforts were honored by the High Point Chamber of Commerce and the Food Alliance at the end of the semester. The students left with professional experience and new ways to relate their talents to community issues.

“I had no idea we would make such an impact on this community,” Campbell said. “I will never forget the experiences with any of the people we worked with.”

 

Moving Forward TogetherCommunity Christmas bw

The service efforts on behalf of the HPU family have risen to a new level. They’re more visible and have increased in quantity and improved in quality. And the numbers are impressive — thousands upon thousands of volunteer hours.

But for those who serve, the real impact is evident most often through smaller, anecdotal moments in the community.

At an annual meeting of the United Way of Greater High Point, packed with community volunteers and nonprofit leaders, one of the organization’s board of directors asked members of the audience a simple question.

“Raise your hand if your organization has been positively impacted by High Point University,” UWGHP board member Vicki Miller told the crowd.

A sea of hands went up.

“It was really impressive. Every nonprofit had their hand up,” Blosser said.

Blosser received the Spirit of Advocacy award at the event, where HPU students also spoke of their volunteer work and gratitude to be connected to the community.

Afterwards, he went back to his office and continued making plans — plans for the service learning classes for 2015 –2016 academic year, for the new VISTAs and their service sites, for the Bonner Leaders and much more.

Joseph Blosser bwAll with this in mind:

“We have moved to long-term, intentional partnerships,” he says. “In communities, there are anchor institutions. Anchor institutions are cornerstones that have been here for many years, and the rest of the community looks up to them. They have an implicit responsibility to their neighbors because of who and where they are. We are developing intentional partnerships based on that. We don’t want to help here and there. We want to help all the time and create major impact.”

 

 


View this story and more in the Winter 2016 edition of the HPU Magazine:

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Article source: http://www.highpoint.edu/blog/2016/04/commitment-to-community/

Sussex garden center grew into destination it planned

East Coast Garden Center in Millsboro may be a little off the beaten path, but it’s well worth the trip.

The award-winning, family-run enterprise is the place to go if you want to buy plants, get married, take a class, pick up a gift, listen to a live radio show, tend a community garden plot or just take a stroll around their 15 acres.

In business since 1990, the garden center is one of the most diverse not just in Delaware, but in the mid-Atlantic, having been named Top Garden Center in the northeast three years in a row from Today’s Garden Center magazine.

“I want us to be a destination,” says co-owner Valery Cordrey, who, with her husband, Steve, and brother-in-law, Rick Cordrey, run the business with their adult children. Nestled into the rich farm country near Indian River Bay, it’s away from beach traffic yet closely associated with the local community.

“The business is growing and we continue to diversify,” she says, noting that they have evolved with the needs and wants of their ever-changing retail customer base, which includes year-round locals, summer residents, and tourists. Offering something for everyone is well within their grasp, and anticipating not only gardening but lifestyle trends has been key to their success.

Garden and Pond Expo April 23-24


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Article source: http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/lake/crown-point/garden-and-pond-expo-april/article_ede95777-8672-5bb1-b506-c0e8c3c27592.html

Gardening In Colorado: 5 Tips To Get Your Spring Plants In The Ground

This week’s rain may have you dreaming of ripe tomatoes, rows of lettuce and fresh herbs in your garden. To get ready for the season, Colorado Matters host Ryan Warner spoke with Larry Stebbins, director of Pikes Peak Urban Gardens in Colorado Springs and author of “The Backyard Vegetable Gardening Guide: A Monthly Primer for the Organic Gardener in the Colorado Front Range and Beyond.”

Here are five tips from Stebbins:

1) Don’t Overcrowd Your Garden

“Many people, for example, think that if they have a four-by-eight [foot] garden bed, that that can fit maybe 10 tomato plants,” Stebbins said. “We show them that fits about two.” 


A diagram of a Colorado backyard vegetable garden.

(Photo: Courtesy of Pikes Peak Urban Gardens)

Nevertheless, a 20-foot by 20-foot plot should produce enough vegetables, if well planned, for one or two people to have enough fresh produce to eat all year long, he said. 

2) Be Patient

Stebbins said even though we’re seeing some warm days and welcome rain in the Denver area, a cold snap last year should remain fresh in a responsible gardener’s mind. 

“In the first week in May we had some bitter cold weather that really set a lot of us back and we weren’t expecting that. So you know I’m telling people to be optimistic but plan for mother nature taking a twist,” he said.

If you do plant now, Stebbins said to try covering your plants with a milk carton with the bottom cut out. That will help protect them from the cold. Some commercial options for protecting your early season plants exist too. 

3) If You *Must* Plant Something Now, Try Lettuce Or Potatoes

“If you eat the leaf or eat the root, those are the things you can get in right now,” Stebbins said. “Things like spinach especially and field greens.”

That said, Stebbins warned that some types of lettuce aren’t very frost-resistant. The solution: Buy a variety of seeds. 

“The dark colored leafy ones tend to survive very good,” he said. “The ones that died are more like the iceberg type, which we don’t plant too much of around here. They’re a little less hardy.”

As for tubers, Stebbins said now’s the time.  “Get ’em down about three inches in the soil and cover ’em up and you should be good to go.”

4) Get Your Soil In Planting Shape

Fall is the best time to get soil ready for the spring plant. But if you didn’t do that back during football season, Stebbins said to skip animal manure. It won’t have time to break down properly. Instead, use organic, vegetable-based fertilizer like Yum Yum Mix, which contains things like alfalfa meal and cottonseed meal. 

“These all break down fairly quickly and give your plants a little boost. And it also gets the soil a little more friable, a little more crumbly,” Stebbins said. 

5) How The Marijuana Industry Helped Other Types Of Indoor Gardening

With the legalization of marijuana and the rise of indoor grow facilities, a lot of money has been poured into research to make technology better. Many grows use expensive LED bulbs, but Stebbins recommended the T5HO fluorescent bulb. 

“It’s efficient enough and very affordable,” he said. “You can buy them at your local big box store for $100 for a four-lightbulb, four-fixture set.”

For more tips, check out previous interviews with Stebbins on Colorado Matters:

Article source: http://www.cpr.org/news/story/gardening-colorado-5-tips-get-your-spring-plants-ground

HopePrescott.com : Prescott Plant Sale audience gets gardening tips

Look at me!

Look at me!

Chris Olsen, keynote speaker at the 8th Annual Garden Show and Plant Sale in Prescott, takes a selfie.



Posted: Tuesday, April 12, 2016 10:09 am

HopePrescott.com : Prescott Plant Sale audience gets gardening tips

John Miller, HopePrescott.com

magnoliareporter.com

PRESCOTT – Saturday’s 8th Annual Garden Show and Plant Sale was the largest ever with more than 160 people showing up.

The area was packed tightly with plants moving quickly. Early on there were plenty of tomato plants, but by the time the event began in the Stokes Center, most of them were gone.

The theme of the show and sale was “Spring … A Time to Till” and featured Chris Olsen as the keynote speaker. Olsen had fun with the Master Gardeners in the audience, saying they didn’t know anything, but bounced back by saying they’re more than willing to ask questions and learn.

Olsen spoke on the topic of “Drab to Fab,” telling how he’s opened a new garden center in North Little Rock and inviting those in the audience to come visit. He made a PowerPoint presentation showing how to use plants in different varieties and colors, to enhance a yard, regardless of its size. “Landscaping,” he said, “gets outdated and needs to be changed and kept fresh.” This, he added, can be done using different colors and textures of plants, along with different types of plants to give the lawn personality.

He said boxwood plants are always a good choice because they’re nearly indestructible. He also suggested using “drifts” or large groupings of plants in a small area. Yellow, he continued, is always a good choice because the eye is naturally attracted to it.

Olsen reminded the audience landscaping does need to be done to scale and “size matters”. “Don’t skimp, put plants in pots and switch them out annually.”

Using seasonal colors can create an attractive walkway

CLICK THE LINK BELOW to read more of this article at HopePrescott.com .

http://www.hopeprescott.com/garden-show-biggest-ever/

on

Tuesday, April 12, 2016 10:09 am.

Article source: http://www.magnoliareporter.com/living_and_learning/education/article_55eec296-00c0-11e6-aacd-ab7644849d0d.html