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Archives for April 3, 2016

Home and Garden Show Draws Hundreds






LOVES PARK (WIFR) — It might have felt like winter today, but hundreds of people are thinking about spring as they explore the Home and Garden Showcase.

Over 50 local vendors are showing off their newest products. Vendors and businesses are displaying the latest trends in landscaping, decks, remodeling, backyard ponds, and more at the Forest Hills Lodge in Loves Park. There’s also hundreds of plants for sale to help get us in the spirit of spring.

“The show is great it welcomes spring it always got a nice touch of spring that everyone needs at this time of year and it has a lot of ideas for planning your spring projects inside and outside,” explains Andrea Costello, the Home and Garden Show producer.

The Home and Garden Showcase will be open again tomorrow from 10am-5pm. Admission is free.

Article source: http://www.wifr.com/home/headlines/Home-and-Garden-Show-Draws-Hundreds-374388851.html

Whalom group is aiming to raise funds to restore iconic amusement park

LEOMINSTER — How much would you be willing to pay to see a new version of Whalom Park?

Right now, that’s the big question, and one of the two obstacles the New Whalom Cooperative faces in bringing a little of the beloved amusement park back to life.

If 1,000 local residents managed to band together and invest $300 each, New Whalom Treasurer Mike Coutamarsh says the new park could be open within the year.

“It could even take as little as a couple months. It would just be a matter of contract negotiations for the lease,” Coutamarsh said of the organization’s current effort to secure a location.

A concentrated effort from locals isn’t far from what members of the New Whalom Cooperative are hoping for. Because it is a cooperative organization, the new park would be owned by consumers, each getting a stake in the project after paying a minimum $300 buy-in.

Aside from securing the $300,000 in funding needed to open, New Whalom also needs a site.

According to Cooperative President Scott Lanciani, New Whalom is in the process of acquiring a site in Leominster. Although unwilling to specify where, Lanciani did say the property consists of an existing facility large enough to fit what they’re hoping to have.

“(The site) has a lot of the equipment we’d need and they’re willing to lease the property, the building and the equipment to us,” said Lanciani. “I can’t get into much more detail other than to say it’s in Leominster.

We’re in talks with them, but it’s positive.”

Lanciani admits New Whalom will never be able to completely replicate what the original park offered, but for the time being, it’s the next best thing.

The original Whalom Park had been in operation for more than a century in Lunenburg before it was closed in 2000, eventually being demolished in 2006 to make way for a condominium development.

Lanciani began researching how a new park could be created in 2008, then created the New Whalom Cooperative two years later.

After initial plans to rebuild an outdoor amusement park across the street from the original location fell through, New Whalom has since moved on to the possibility of creating an indoor family entertainment facility.

Despite being indoors and in a different community than the original park, New Whalom would seek to create what concept artist Andrew Probert calls the “Whalom illusion.”

Probert’s current vision for the family entertainment facility would be like a snap-shot of Whalom Park, circa 1970. Although indoors, the new park would be designed in a way that would make visitors feel like they’re outside on a summer night. They would navigate from one attraction to another, stopping at booths modeled after original buildings from the park.

A weathervane-like piece from Whalom Park is on display at the Lunenburg History Center. The illusion would be further aided by artificial landscaping, bird sounds and even wind.

“We would want it to have all the fun of being in the old park at night in order to recreate the old nostalgia of past date nights and family trips,” Probert said of the design.

If Probert’s idea sounds whimsical, it should come as no surprise. From 1987 to 1990 he had worked at Walt Disney Imagineering, prior to which he had served as a production designer on a variety of films and TV shows. His work included designing the spaceships used in “Star Trek: The Motion Picture,” creating the original Cylon robots for “Battlestar Gallactica,” and consulting on the design for the Delorean used in “Back to the Future.”

As a Disney Imagineer, Probert also helped design portions of Disneyland Paris and update portions of Tomorrowland at Disneyland.

Probert moved to Massachusetts seven years ago, settling in Leominster, and approached Lanciani shortly after hearing about ideas of a new Whalom Park.

“I’m not a local, but I’ve been learning that it remains a very fond memory for people in the area,” Probert said.

Aside from games, concessions and a museum of original Whalom artifacts and memorabilia collected by members of the cooperative, New Whalom could also feature some of the park’s original rides.

Lanciani explained that he has been in contact with a Carlisle-based collector who owns three of the original Whalom Park kiddie rides, the Model-T Silver cars and the park’s train ride. The collector who owns these attractions asked to remain anonymous, but did say that several of the rides had been restored and that he would be willing to sell them to the New Whalom Cooperative.

In the case of the potential Leominster location, Lanciani said the cooperative would hope to put three of the rides outside the indoor facility, adding that they could potentially be fit inside.

As it stands now, the cooperative is only 10 members strong, with a goal of reaching a core number of 500 to 1,000 members. Prospective members can sign up through the cooperative’s website by paying the one-time $300 fee that contributes toward the $300,000 starting cost.

The original Whalom Park, which opened in 1893, was the 13th-oldest amusement park in the United States and the second-oldest trolley park in the world. After the 2006 demolition, the 30-acre property on which the park sat was converted into the Emerald Place at Whalom Lake townhome development.

Follow Peter Jasinski on Twitter and Tout @PeterJasinski53.

Article source: http://www.sentinelandenterprise.com/news/ci_29719638/whalom-group-is-aiming-raise-funds-restore-iconic

Lowry Street study slated to begin soon

SMYRNA — At one time, South Lowry Street served as the main corridor for commerce in the town of Smyrna. But as population increased and stretched beyond the central area, many businesses began to move out of the central part of Smyrna.

In an effort to revitalize the area, the town of Smyrna is partnering with Ragan-Smith Associates to launch a “bridge-to-bridge” market study of South Lowry Street on a 3-mile stretch between Sam Ridley and Nissan parkways.

“As Lowry Street has struggled to compete with other commercial corridors that attract national retailers,” said Kevin Rigsby, town planner of Smyrna. “We are hopeful we can take a look at the area and bring along some ideas that will help revitalize it, whatever that ends up being.”

The purpose of the study is to identify the possibility of a new mixture of uses for Lowry Street and improve visual conditions along the corridor. The study will consider two primary development uses — retail and residential — and will focus on character areas, key “nodes” and intersections, throughout the corridor to identify opportunities and connectivity with other key areas of Smyrna.

“So much has happened with Sam Ridley Parkway and that’s great. We love having new development, but we want to make sure our historic part of town is also taken care of,” said Smyrna Mayor Mary Esther Reed.

Lowry Street remains home to a lot of mom-and-pop businesses, from restaurants to retail. Rigsby said hopefully the market study, which will analyze data as well as conduct interviews with business owners, will help get an idea to help people who do own property in the corridor.

“Smyrna is a highly desirable growth area for business, industry and for families to live” said Randy Caldwell, Ragan-Smith executive vice president and a registered landscape architect (RLA). “We believe Lowry Street offers some unique opportunities for mixed use development.”

Within recent years, the downtown Depot District in Smyrna underwent a facelift and revitalization, restoring that area to its former hustle and bustle of activity.

The Smyrna Depot serves as an anchor for a variety of festivals and events that go on throughout the year, and a variety of retail and restaurant businesses have made the quaint spot home. That same sort of revitalization is what Rigsby said he hopes the new study of South Lowry will accomplish.

On the other side of the railroad tracks from the Smyrna Depot is another project underway.

“It’s a parallel project we are working on through a grant issued from TDOT,” Rigsby said. That project may include landscaping, rehabbed sidewalks for ease of foot traffic, among other refurbishments.

The zoning overlay study will be taking place over the next few months and the public will be invited to be an interactive and integral part of the process, Rigsby emphasized.

Multiple opportunities for the public and key stakeholders to provide input and feedback throughout the process will be available, including in-person interviews, a steering committee with multiple meetings and a four-day visioning charette that includes two public open houses, for a total of three public open houses throughout the study.

“I like that it’s going to give our citizens a voice and an option in the older part of Smyrna,” Reed said.

The study will also be presented to the Planning Commission and Town Council.

“We want people to be involved in this intensive process, the business owners, property owners and anyone else that has an interest in the town,” Rigsby said.

Opportunity to participate in discussions will be open at public meetings and a steering committee will help facilitate that process, he said.

“There’s also a Facebook page dedicated to this project,” Rigsby said. Also there facebook page dedicated to this project.

In the near future, there won’t be any “concrete, visible” results from the study.

“But hopefully within a year or two there will be something visible, especially in the immediate area in downtown,” Rigsby said. “We’re excited about it and we want the entire community to grow and prosper and we have the opportunity to help the area that’s maybe struggling a little bit.”

Reporter Nancy De Gennaro at 615-278-5148 and follow her on Twitter @DNJMama

Article source: http://www.dnj.com/story/news/2016/04/03/lowry-street-study-slated-begin-soon/81978500/

Think spring at Seacoast Home and Garden Show



Posted Apr. 2, 2016 at 4:54 PM


Article source: http://www.fosters.com/article/20160402/NEWS/160409869

Tropical Gardening: Fragrance adds another pleasure to Hawaiian gardens

“April showers bring May flowers” on the mainland, but in Hawaii, spring is all year. However, there is a noticeable spring fever effect when it comes to local gardeners because many flowers start heavy blooming at this time.

Garden groups such as the Hawaii Island Palm Society have programs open to the public to stimulate interest and share their expertise this time of year.

On Friday (April 8), the public is invited to a program about rare palms of Malaysia. Guest speaker will be Jeff Marcus, famed nurseryman, plant explorer and collector of palms. His Big Island nursery probably carries more palm species than any other in the U.S. The program will be at 7 p.m. at the University of Hawaii at Hilo in Room 100. The lecture will be the first of a two-part series, with the second part set for Friday, April 29. The latter will focus on palms of Sarawak, Borneo.

The Hawaii Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society is having its annual membership drive and meeting at noon Sunday, April 17, at the Keaau Community Center for all you folks who want to learn about and grow tropical Vireya rhododendrons. You can call president Bill Miller at 982-8290 for meeting details.

•••

Have you ever noticed Hawaiian air smells better than many places on the mainland?

Visitors and residents returning from a trip often comment about the sweet heavy fragrance the moment they step off the plane. This is especially true now as plumeria, jasmine and other flowers begin their spring bloom.

Coffee trees bloom this time of year, adding fragrance along country roads, as well as with ylang ylang (Cananga oderata), mulang (Michelia champaca), lemon-scented magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) and many other flowering trees.

Hawaii has a special magic. The scents of flowers perfume the air and set a tropical, romantic mood whether you live mauka or makai. By adding more flowering plants to your area, you can combat unpleasant smells such as car exhaust fumes or rubbish cans.

There are many good choices for your garden. The scent of orange blossoms and, of course, grapefruit, lime, lemon and tangerine blossoms all have delicious fragrances. During the longer days of summer, many species of ginger are in full bloom, and in the evening white, yellow and rose flowered angel trumpets make for perfect garden romance.

But there are many other less-known and more varied plants that can add to our gardens.

All the plants listed below have fragrant flowers. Some of them such as plumeria, night blooming jasmine, fragrant dracaena, gardenia and mock orange are equipped with fragrance so potent it can fill every inch of garden air space and drift into the house, too. Others such as the spider lily produce more subtle perfumes that usually won’t travel quite as far and are best appreciated at close range.

There are dozens of species of ginger and let us not forget our native alahe‘e and hoawa available at some nurseries.

One very striking shade lover is the Brunfelsia. The shrub is a native of South America. Its scientific name is Brunfelsia calycina floribunda. It gets its common name, yesterday-today-and tomorrow, from the fact that the 2-inch tubular, flaring flowers are purple one day, violet the next and almost white the next. They flower chiefly spring through fall, but can continue much of the year where conditions such as warmth and humidity are ideal.

There are several other species sometimes available at local nurseries. The plant can grow as high as 10 feet in partial shade, but can be kept as low as 3 feet by pruning.

There are many kinds of jasmine as well as several other plants called by that name including star jasmine and orange jasmine (mock orange) that are not jasmines at all.

There are several true jasmines that bloom with fragrant flowers. Jasminum ilicifolium and Jasminum multifolorum are two shrubs used as foundation plantings. They also can be grown as vines and will bloom more profusely. Jasminum sambac is the one we call pikake.

Star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) is a vine. Tie this plant to a post, fence or some other support and it will climb. Pinch out the viny branch tips and it will cover the ground. The clusters of star-shaped, white flowers contrast nicely with shiny dark green leaves. This vine is sometimes referred to as maile jasmine because the leaves resemble maile.

Mock orange (Murraya paniculata), or orange jasmine, is a member of the citrus family and is an attractive evergreen shrub or small tree with glossy green pinnately-compound leaves. The white, very fragrant flowers are produced at intervals throughout the year, followed by clusters of red ovoid fruit. It is a vigorous grower and can be used as a small tree, an informal high hedge or screen or can be trimmed to a formal shape.

Night blooming jasmine (Cestrum nocturnum) produces flowers with a powerful scent. A single plant per garden should be plenty. These evergreen shrubs grow 6 to 8 feet tall or more and bloom off and on throughout the year.

The ever popular plumeria should be found in most gardens, but a close relative is rare. It is known as Tabernaemontana, or cinnamon gardenia, and was originally introduced by Paul Weissich in 1960 from Africa.

Flowers are produced all during the year and have a cinnamon fragrance. The odor is delicate, but one or two flowers perfume the whole garden. Close relatives are Ervatamia (crepe jasmine), Cerbera, Stemmadenia and oleander.

Stop by your local garden shops and nurseries to find these plants and many others to add garden fragrance. A great reference book to help you chose plants for your garden and their care is Sunset’s New Western Garden Book, available at most garden shops.

This information is supplied by the University of Hawaii College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. For further information about gardening and landscaping, contact one of our master gardeners at 322-4892 in Kona or 981-5199 in Hilo.

Article source: http://hawaiitribune-herald.com/news/community/tropical-gardening-fragrance-adds-another-pleasure-hawaiian-gardens

Landscape & Garden Fair slated April 16-17

Children's Passport event

Children’s Passport event

A child is seen navigating Discovery Gardens with a passport in hand at last year’s Landscape Garden Fair.



Posted: Sunday, April 3, 2016 6:00 am

Landscape Garden Fair slated April 16-17


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TAVARES — Lake County’s 5th Annual Landscape Garden Fair, a botanical-themed, free festival, is two weeks away.

It takes place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on April 16 and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on April 17 at the Lake County Extension Center’s Discovery Gardens, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares.

Sponsored by Lake County, The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County and the Lake County Master Gardeners, the indoor/outdoor festival will provide visitors an opportunity to browse and purchase goods from vendors selling landscaping, native plants, roses and fruit trees.

Guest speakers will talk about a variety of topics, including butterfly gardening, unusual edibles, shade gardening and hydroponics, according to a press release from Elisha Pappacoda, the county’s public information officer.

Classes will include Unusual Edibles, Plant Recipes for Container Gardens, Hydroponics in a Bucket and Creating a Community Garden, to name a few. All classes are free to attend, and some are taught inside the auditorium while others, such as a class about roses, will take place outdoors in the gardens and include demonstrations.

Discovery Gardens features 24 themed gardens, including a string of lush courtyards and five specially designed children’s gardens.

For kids, activities will include the Children’s Passport, with stops at five gardens, including the Tropical Shade Garden, Orchard, Butterfly House, Palm Walk and Southern Shade Garden. Children can also participate in the Maze Scavenger Hunt, complete with prizes.

A special butterfly release is scheduled for 10 a.m. on April 16 with Teresa Wooddy, UF/IFAS Lake County Master Gardener.

For more information, call 352-343-4101 or visitwww.lakecountyfl.gov/gardenfair.

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Article source: http://www.dailycommercial.com/news/article_d7bf21c5-d365-500a-a771-59d80f2f3df6.html

Smart Gardening Fair features tips on creating a sustainable home environment

At first glance, it might seem that the lush, verdant landscapes created in Japanese gardening are a little at odds with one of the goals of the Smart Gardening Fair — helping local gardeners be more water-wise.

But it’s entirely possible to follow this gardening style in arid California, according to renowned landscape architect Ron Herman, who has been designing such gardens for five decades. He’ll share his expertise this Saturday at the Smart Gardening Fair, now in its 10th year.

Herman, based in San Leandro but with long-standing ties to the Monterey Peninsula, is one of five speakers slated for the free event. Attendees will also be able to hear presentations on how to care for fruit trees during drought, successful pepper growing, herbal remedies and dahlias.

The Smart Gardening Fair kicks off the spring planting season for many local gardeners, offering not only sage advice from speakers, but also exhibitors offering a wide selection of goods and services, demonstrations of everything from backyard beekeeping to composting, perennial plants and vegetable seedlings for sale, and, of course, advice from local Master Gardeners. Food and drink will also be available for purchase.

It’s no accident, either, that the fair is scheduled so close to Earth Day. It’s all about creating a sustainable home environment, with information available throughout the day on organic gardening and using less water.

There’s no charge to attend the fair or any of its events, including the speakers that are scheduled throughout the day.

The Smart Gardening Fair is just one of the annual events hosted by the Monterey Bay Master Gardeners, which includes members from Monterey, Santa Cruz and San Benito counties. The community service organization’s goal is to provide the public with University of California research-based information about home gardening, sustainable landscaping and pest management. Lead sponsor for the fair is the Water Awareness Committee of Monterey County, with representatives on hand to offer water-saving tips.

Ron Herman’s talk at 11 a.m., “The Art of Restraint: Concepts of Japanese Garden Design,” will relay the history of Japanese gardens, and also how they can be made to look lovely with less water. The lecture will concentrate on design concepts that can be used by designers and homeowners anywhere.

“In Japan, there’s lots of rainfall, so water is not a problem,” said Herman. “But there are various techniques that can be used here for the same effect” — most notably, use of drip irrigation and choosing drought-tolerant plants that will look good with little moisture.

Herman, who has worked on numerous high-end projects on the Monterey Peninsula, said he’s hoping to retire to Monterey at some point, where he and his wife own a second home. “I’m looking forward to sitting at home and sketching,” he said.

Herman’s long career stretches all the way back to growing up in North Hollywood, where his father was a nurseryman and garden builder. At the time, Herman recalls, most people in this line of business were Japanese immigrants or Japanese-American, and he got to know them through his father, and to appreciate Japanese culture.

In the early 1960s, while studying landscape architecture at UC Berkeley, he realized that the best way to learn about Japanese gardens was to go to the source. He accepted a research fellowship at Kyoto University to study the history of Japanese gardens.

Herman ended up taking “thousands of slides,” he said, and ultimately co-authored a popular guide to the gardens of Kyoto. He returned to California and began designing his own Japanese-style gardens at a time when Silicon Valley was just starting to take off, and ended up designing gardens for high-tech moguls such as Larry Ellison.

His work has been featured in numerous magazines and books, most recently in “The Gardens of Ron Herman” by Bradford McKee and Marc Trieb (Grayson Publishing, 2012).

Also scheduled for the day:

• Fourth-generation citrus nurseryman Aaron Dillon will speak on “Fruit Trees in a Drought” at 10 a.m., with information on pruning, fertilizing, container versus in-ground planting, variety selection, pest control and tree care during drought conditions.

• Monterey chef Tom Snyder shows ways to spice up cuisine with “Peppers — Eating Your Rainbow” at noon, with tips on preparing exotic dishes with this fresh ingredient.

• Garden teacher Margot Grych and experienced herbalist Leta Messenger share “Herbal Insights — Growing and Using Our Plant Allies” at 1 p.m. They’ll focus on the plant family that includes sage, mint and lavender.

• Monterey Bay Dahlia Society president Kristine Albrecht will talk at 2 p.m. about “The Wonder of Dahlias,” with history, growing tips and meeting challenges such as pests and diseases.

Demonstrations during the day include developing and maintaining espalier fruit trees and fruit tree pruning, both by certified arborist Peter Quintanilla; growing your own herbal infusions and teas with Sara Steiner of San Benito Tea Company; backyard chicken raising with Candice McLaren; beekeeping with Ron Morgan and Richard Carr; and composting with master composter Otis Johnson.

If you go

What: 10th annual Master Gardeners’ Smart Gardening Fair

When: Saturday, April 2, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Where: Highway 1 at Rio Road, Carmel, next to the Crossroads shopping center

Admission: Free

Information: 763-8007 or mbmg.ucanr.edu/smartgardeningfair

Article source: http://www.montereyherald.com/lifestyle/20160331/smart-gardening-fair-features-tips-on-creating-a-sustainable-home-environment

Smart Gardening Fair features tips on creating a sustainable home environment

At first glance, it might seem that the lush, verdant landscapes created in Japanese gardening are a little at odds with one of the goals of the Smart Gardening Fair — helping local gardeners be more water-wise.

But it’s entirely possible to follow this gardening style in arid California, according to renowned landscape architect Ron Herman, who has been designing such gardens for five decades. He’ll share his expertise this Saturday at the Smart Gardening Fair, now in its 10th year.

Herman, based in San Leandro but with long-standing ties to the Monterey Peninsula, is one of five speakers slated for the free event. Attendees will also be able to hear presentations on how to care for fruit trees during drought, successful pepper growing, herbal remedies and dahlias.

The Smart Gardening Fair kicks off the spring planting season for many local gardeners, offering not only sage advice from speakers, but also exhibitors offering a wide selection of goods and services, demonstrations of everything from backyard beekeeping to composting, perennial plants and vegetable seedlings for sale, and, of course, advice from local Master Gardeners. Food and drink will also be available for purchase.

It’s no accident, either, that the fair is scheduled so close to Earth Day. It’s all about creating a sustainable home environment, with information available throughout the day on organic gardening and using less water.

There’s no charge to attend the fair or any of its events, including the speakers that are scheduled throughout the day.

The Smart Gardening Fair is just one of the annual events hosted by the Monterey Bay Master Gardeners, which includes members from Monterey, Santa Cruz and San Benito counties. The community service organization’s goal is to provide the public with University of California research-based information about home gardening, sustainable landscaping and pest management. Lead sponsor for the fair is the Water Awareness Committee of Monterey County, with representatives on hand to offer water-saving tips.

Ron Herman’s talk at 11 a.m., “The Art of Restraint: Concepts of Japanese Garden Design,” will relay the history of Japanese gardens, and also how they can be made to look lovely with less water. The lecture will concentrate on design concepts that can be used by designers and homeowners anywhere.

“In Japan, there’s lots of rainfall, so water is not a problem,” said Herman. “But there are various techniques that can be used here for the same effect” — most notably, use of drip irrigation and choosing drought-tolerant plants that will look good with little moisture.

Herman, who has worked on numerous high-end projects on the Monterey Peninsula, said he’s hoping to retire to Monterey at some point, where he and his wife own a second home. “I’m looking forward to sitting at home and sketching,” he said.

Herman’s long career stretches all the way back to growing up in North Hollywood, where his father was a nurseryman and garden builder. At the time, Herman recalls, most people in this line of business were Japanese immigrants or Japanese-American, and he got to know them through his father, and to appreciate Japanese culture.

In the early 1960s, while studying landscape architecture at UC Berkeley, he realized that the best way to learn about Japanese gardens was to go to the source. He accepted a research fellowship at Kyoto University to study the history of Japanese gardens.

Herman ended up taking “thousands of slides,” he said, and ultimately co-authored a popular guide to the gardens of Kyoto. He returned to California and began designing his own Japanese-style gardens at a time when Silicon Valley was just starting to take off, and ended up designing gardens for high-tech moguls such as Larry Ellison.

His work has been featured in numerous magazines and books, most recently in “The Gardens of Ron Herman” by Bradford McKee and Marc Trieb (Grayson Publishing, 2012).

Also scheduled for the day:

• Fourth-generation citrus nurseryman Aaron Dillon will speak on “Fruit Trees in a Drought” at 10 a.m., with information on pruning, fertilizing, container versus in-ground planting, variety selection, pest control and tree care during drought conditions.

• Monterey chef Tom Snyder shows ways to spice up cuisine with “Peppers — Eating Your Rainbow” at noon, with tips on preparing exotic dishes with this fresh ingredient.

• Garden teacher Margot Grych and experienced herbalist Leta Messenger share “Herbal Insights — Growing and Using Our Plant Allies” at 1 p.m. They’ll focus on the plant family that includes sage, mint and lavender.

• Monterey Bay Dahlia Society president Kristine Albrecht will talk at 2 p.m. about “The Wonder of Dahlias,” with history, growing tips and meeting challenges such as pests and diseases.

Demonstrations during the day include developing and maintaining espalier fruit trees and fruit tree pruning, both by certified arborist Peter Quintanilla; growing your own herbal infusions and teas with Sara Steiner of San Benito Tea Company; backyard chicken raising with Candice McLaren; beekeeping with Ron Morgan and Richard Carr; and composting with master composter Otis Johnson.

If you go

What: 10th annual Master Gardeners’ Smart Gardening Fair

When: Saturday, April 2, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Where: Highway 1 at Rio Road, Carmel, next to the Crossroads shopping center

Admission: Free

Information: 763-8007 or mbmg.ucanr.edu/smartgardeningfair

Article source: http://www.montereyherald.com/lifestyle/20160331/smart-gardening-fair-features-tips-on-creating-a-sustainable-home-environment

Garden Variety: Spring gardening fair bursts with pro tips

Gardening can be a daunting task for new and experienced gardeners alike, but the Douglas County Extension Master Gardeners are hoping to take some of the guesswork out of it at their upcoming educational fair.

The spring fair, titled “Mastering Your Lawn and Garden” is set for Saturday, April 9, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Building 21 at the Douglas County 4-H Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper St. The fair is free and open to the public. Families are welcome.

Master Gardeners will be on hand at the fair with displays, demonstrations, ideas and fliers to take home on just about everything related to gardening.

Lists of recommended plant varieties, tips on composting and soil improvement, and the latest information on emerald ash borer are a few of the things visitors can pick up. Tool sharpening is available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The best part of the fair, though, is the depth of knowledge available to attendees. Master Gardeners have all been through an extensive training course coordinated by Kansas State University Research and Extension. Many of them have years of experience and knowledge on specialty topics like composting with worms, kitchen gardening, use of biological controls for pests and xeriscaping.

The fair is a great opportunity to ask questions and chat one on one with people who garden here in the Lawrence area and know the unique challenges of Kansas weather, pests and soil.

Another highlight of the fair is a family table with activities for children and ideas on how to get them involved in the garden. Visitors will be able to look and learn about plant growth stages. For fun, the table includes vegetable stamp painting, garden-themed coloring sheets and a scavenger hunt.

For those looking to start gardening on a budget, a garden “garage sale” will offer gently used and repurposed garden items for sale. Master Gardeners have also handcrafted many garden-themed crafts that will be offered for sale, and there are door prizes. All proceeds from sale items support Master Gardener educational programs.

Master Gardeners are participants in a volunteer and educational program; they receive university-supported education in exchange for time donated to community outreach. More information about the Douglas County chapter of Master Gardeners is available at www.douglascountymastergardeners.org or through K-State Research and Extension – Douglas County.


— Jennifer Smith is a former horticulture extension agent for K-State Research and Extension and horticulturist for Lawrence Parks and Recreation. She is the host of “The Garden Show.” Send your gardening questions and feedback to features@ljworld.com.

Copyright 2016 The

Lawrence Journal-World.

All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
We strive to uphold our values for every story published.

Article source: http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2016/apr/02/garden-variety-spring-gardening-fair-bursts-pro-ti/

Dirty Fingernails: Tips on keeping deer from eating garden plants

Molly Hackett

Article source: http://missoulian.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/dirty-fingernails-tips-on-keeping-deer-from-eating-garden-plants/article_612c3af8-2fef-502c-bb7d-1f2019413370.html