Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Archives for March 16, 2016

Events from March 14 to March 20

Sneak Peak at 2017 Snowmobiles
Friday Mar 18 Saturday Mar 19 – Barrie
Make plans to attend a 2017 Manufacturers’ Sneak Peek and see next year’s sleds now…. before anyone else.  See 2017 snowmobiles from Polaris, Ski-Doo and Yamaha. This show also features new snowmobile accessories, local club and trail information and factory experts with all the details on next year’s sleds.

Spring Festival at Chappell Farms
Saturday Sunday March 19-20 Friday, Saturday Sunday March 25-27 – Barrie
Hourly candy hunts, magic shows, the Easter Bunny, animals, wagon rides, trike track, jumping castle, train ride (weather permitting), food and fun!
Dress for mud and don’t forget your cameras!

Rounds Ranch Easter Egg Hunt
Saturday Mar 19 Sunday March 20, Friday March 25 Saturday March 26 – Elmvale
Hip! Hop! Hooray! Easter’s on its way, and we couldn’t be more egg-cited! The Easter Bunny has been busy working all winter to prepare for the Rounds Ranch annual Easter Egg Hunt.  There are 4 trails to hop on: Bunny Trail, Rabbit Trail, Mystery Trail and Resurrection Trail – find all of the eggs the Easter Bunny has hidden.  Plus, visit with the Easter Bunny and have your picture taken with him, visit the petting zoo, enjoy the barrel train cars, zip lines and huge slides, and race around the track on the pedal carts.

Spring, Home and Outdoor Show
Friday Mar 18 to Sunday Mar 20 – Lindsay Exhibition Grounds
If you are looking forward to tackling some projects around the house once warmer weather arrives, the 8th Annual 2016 Spring Home and Outdoor Show is the place to be. This ever-popular event is the biggest of its kind in the area with more than 150 vendors offering the latest renovation products and services. This is a great opportunity for visitors to meet with the vendors, to get quotes and any questions answered and to find innovative ideas to freshen up your home for spring!        

25th Annual Sweetwater Harvest Festival
Saturday Mar 19 Sunday Mar 20 from10am-4pm – Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre
Celebrate a uniquely Canadian tradition in a distinctively Canadian landscape.  Sweetwater is not your average maple syrup festival. Yes there are sugar shack tours, pancakes and taffy tasting, but there is so much more to the weekend long festival.  There are birds of prey and reptile/amphibian talks; wilderness survival, cooking and woodcarving demos; and of course chickadee feeding.

Toronto Sportsmen’s Show
Wednesday Mar 16 to Sunday Mar 20 – Mississauga
With over 350 exhibits, the Toronto Sportsmen’s Show is the largest show of its kind and will feature an array of interactive and educational exhibits – everything from fishing and boating, to hunting, camping and travel.         

Canada Blooms: The Flower and Garden Festival
Friday March 11 to Sunday March 20 – Toronto
It’s A Party at the 20th Annual Canada Blooms 2016! Canada Blooms is an annual world-class festival that connects people to the joys and benefits of nature through experiences with gardens and flowers by promoting, educating, inspiring and celebrating all aspects of horticulture.
        
National Home Show
Friday March 11 to Sunday March 20 – Toronto
Gather inspiration for you home and landscaping projects at the 2016 National Home Show!     Exhibitors will be showcasing their vibrant expositions connecting home, décor, and renovation ideas. You won’t want to miss this great opportunity to collect and share tips, ideas and trends.  

Tap Into Maple
March 1 to May 31 – Ontario’s Lake Country
Filled with a variety of different stops throughout the region, the Tap into Maple route will get your senses flowing and your mouth watering. Come and experience  maple history, taste local maple cuisine, and create your own maple products. Make sure to pick-up your Tap into Maple passport at participating locations – 24 in all!  Show your passport and upon purchase or participation at each location you will be rewarded with a maple stamp on your brochure. Collect at least three stamps and submit your maple passport for a chance to win one of three prizes!

Sugarbush Maple Syrup Festival
Open March 5 to April 3 on weekends – Stouffville
Come out and tap into spring! Enjoy demonstrations, wagon rides, activities and of course pancakes and real maple syrup! Plus enjoy special family-fun activities on weekends and throughout March Break.

Sugarbush Maple Syrup Festival
Daily March 5 to April 3 – Woodbridge
Come out and tap into spring! Enjoy demonstrations, wagon rides, activities and of course pancakes and real maple syrup! Plus enjoy special family-fun activities on weekends and throughout March Break.       

The Ontario Travel Information Centre is at Mapleview Drive and Highway 400 in Barrie. They are open daily from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Visit www.ontariotravel.net for more.

Article source: http://barrie.ctvnews.ca/events-from-march-14-to-march-20-1.1361670

Robert Zimmerman, who showcased Charlotte through Southern Shows, dies at 84

When the Charlotte Merchandise Mart opened in 1961 as a brand-new exhibition venue, Robert Zimmerman and his wife and business partner, Joan, relocated here.

“They moved to Charlotte, really, because of that building,” says the Zimmermans’ son, David.

“And (they) started producing.”

Together, they created the consumer-show series Southern Shows, Inc. Joan handled the business side, while Robert Zimmerman came up with the ideas.

As the pioneering series evolved to celebrate gardening, the Christmas season, home decor and more, it gave thousands of visitors a reason to come to Charlotte, years before the city was considered a destination area.

Zimmerman, 84, died Monday night at Novant Health Presbyterian Medical Center in Charlotte. His wife, Joan, survives him, as do David and another son, Robert Jr.

The cause of death was congestive heart failure, according to David Zimmerman.

“When my parents started doing this, there weren’t many people around doing it,” says David Zimmerman, president of Southern Shows Inc.

His parents held their first Charlotte show in 1962. From there, the series has grown to 18 shows a year in 12 cities, with the Southern Christmas Show in Charlotte becoming the largest holiday show in the country, attracting more than 100,000 visitors. Their business has 33 full-time employees.

Other shows in the series with Charlotte stops include the Southern Ideal Home Show, the Southern Women’s Show and Southern Spring Home Garden Show.

“Part of the reason for that is really his vision and his ability to kind of make something out of nothing, if you will,” says David Zimmerman.

Robert Zimmerman is described by family and friends as mild-mannered and wildly creative, with hobbies that included landscaping. A Greensboro native, Zimmerman was serving in the U.S. Army in Germany when he met “the love of his life,” Joan, who was working in a civilian job there.

After relocating to his hometown, Robert Zimmerman worked in his father’s business, selling electric fences for farms. Joan worked in Raleigh for public relations agent John Hardin.

As David tells it, his mother was eavesdropping on a conversation between Hardin and Dr. J.S. Dorton, general manager of the North Carolina State Fair, who was suggesting putting on a flower show at the new Dorton Arena. The thinking was, a show might keep women closer to home, instead of traveling to Philadelphia and New York for similar events.

Joan Zimmerman immediately volunteered her husband to put on the event. He teamed with Joan and Hardin to put on a flower show in the Dorton Arena in 1961.

That was the year Charlotte’s merchandise mart – now known as The Park Expo Conference Center – opened. They saw the space as a canvas where they could draw visitors through various exhibitions that showcased local talent and entrepreneurs.

With shows designed to highlight vendors and draw in shoppers, Charlotte’s small-business community prospered from the exposure, according to Bob Morgan, Charlotte Chamber president and CEO.

“Long before Charlotte became the destination it is today, Southern Shows gave people from throughout this region reasons to visit Charlotte and spend money here,” Morgan said via email. “The events have become an annual pilgrimage for many.”

Through the Southern Spring Home Garden Show, Robert Zimmerman was credited with introducing residential landscape design to the region, his son said. In 2009, Robert Zimmerman won the Citizen’s Award from the American Society of Landscape Architects.

As Southern Shows grew, so did the Zimmermans’ charitable giving. One of their many efforts was sponsoring a benefit preview night of their shows, with money going to charity.

Charlotte clothier Paul Simon, who met the Zimmermans through philanthropic circles, describes their home as a reflection of their community ties, filled with work by artisans they supported.

Robert Zimmerman’s creations were there, too. He was a talented woodworker, with a workshop in his house, according to Simon.

“He was a very unique guy,” says Simon. “Very, very special.”

Researcher Maria David contributed.

Article source: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/article66460047.html

Southwest Idaho gardening events: Low-water landscaping, growing berries, making a terrarium, more

Thursday, March 17

Low Water Landscaping: 7 to 9 p.m. at Nampa City Hall, 411 3rd St. S. Learn how to achieve a low-water landscape that looks great. Topics include hydrozoning, irrigation and planting design. Presenter: Dan Schults, CWI horticulture professor and certified nursery professional. Free. 468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Friday-Sunday, March 18-20

Boise Flower and Garden Show: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. March 18, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. March 19 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 20, Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St. Shop for the latest in landscape design, garden art and decor, yard furniture, plants, decks, greenhouse, more. Also, display gardens, seminars, orchid and bonsai displays, a silent auction. $8 general, $3 children 12-17, free for under 12. gardenshowboise.com.

Saturday, March 19

Bodacious Berries: 10 a.m. at FarWest Landscape and Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Free. 853-4000.

Wednesday, March 23

Terrarium: 5:30 p.m. at FarWest Landscape and Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. $30. 853-4000.

Tree Problems: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Thursday, March 24

Great Grapes: 6:30 p.m. at the Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Saturday, March 26

Bountiful Blueberries: 10 a.m. at FarWest Landscape and Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Free. 853-4000.

Insect Hotels: 10 a.m. at the Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. $25 general, $20 IBG members. Register: 343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Ready Your Outdoor Pantry: Cool Season Veggies: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Learn what to get started in your garden, and the tools, timing and tricks you need to start your spring garden early and maximize your success with edibles. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Wednesday, March 30

Landscape Design: 5:30 p.m. at FarWest Landscape and Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Free. 853-4000.

Lawn and Irrigation: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Air Plant Workshop: 6:30 p.m. at the Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. $30 general, $25 IBG members. Register: 343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Saturday, April 2

Tree planting and pruning demonstration: 10 a.m. to noon at Lakeview Park, Garrity Boulevard and 16th Avenue North, Nampa. Hands-on tree planting class to learn proper planting and pruning techniques. Presenter: Earl Moran, city forester. Free. 468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Get the Mix Right: Best Practices for Planting, Soil Prep and Irrigation: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Learn the essentials of how to prepare your soil, what fertilizers are best for your garden and the tools you need to help make the job easier. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Wednesday, April 6

Roses and landscape: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Thursday, April 7

Tree disorders, insects and diseases: 7 to 9 p.m. at Nampa City Hall, 411 3rd St. S. Learn about some of the most common insect related problems found on local trees and most common problems created by people. Corrective suggestions will be given to help maintain healthy trees. Presenter: Dan Schults, CWI horticulture professor. Free. 468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Saturday, April 9

Growing Great Pumpkins: 10 a.m. at the Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. $20 general, $15 IBG members. Register: 343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Rose pruning and care: 10 a.m. to noon at Lakeview Park, Garrity Boulevard and 16th Avenue North, Nampa. Learn basic techniques to produce beautiful, healthy roses. Presenter: Lucas Navock, Nampa Parks employee. Free. 468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Spring Plants and Design: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Learn about the best spring plants and how to incorporate them into your garden with companion plants, bulbs, etc. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Tuesday, April 12

Color in Landscape Design: 6:30 p.m. at the Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Saturday, April 16

Get Drought Smart: Design and Plant Now with Natives and Water-wise Plants: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Designers will guide you through the process of creating a sustainable garden to fit your gardens needs. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, April 23

Foodscaping: Innovative Ways to Grow Edibles: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Discover ways to integrate your edibles within the existing garden to maximize your space. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, April 30

Container Garden Drama: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Designers will guide you on the best practices to create a seasonal container for your patio or porch. Bring your ideas and containers. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, May 7

Plant sale: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2201 Woodlawn Ave., Boise. 615-1505.

Vintage Vogue: Roses, Peonies and Hydrangeas: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Learn how to design with David Austin roses, peonies and hydrangeas in your garden. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, May 14

Moveable Feast: Growing Edibles in Containers: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Discover how you can create colorful and aromatic edible container gardens you will enjoy all season long. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, May 21

Growing Up: Trellis and Vines: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Discover how trellis and vines can be utilized to hide areas or create ambiance in your garden space. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturday, May 28

Art in the Garden: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Discover how to utilize garden art to reflect your garden style and create a focal point in your garden space. Free. RSVP: 995-2815, info@madelinegeorge.com.

Article source: http://www.idahostatesman.com/living/home-garden/article66422372.html

Biltmore Blooms marries gown exhibit in happy union – Asheville Citizen

The 74,000 tulips are great — overwhelmingly wonderful, in fact, every April — but this year’s Biltmore Blooms celebration takes place as much inside Biltmore House as in the 75 acres of landscaped gardens outside.

Not that Biltmore House isn’t always awash in flowers and plants. The estate’s seven full-time floral designers, under the direction of floral displays manager Cathy Barnhardt, work 52 weeks a year to keep the home’s many elegant rooms decorated with seasonal blossoms and greenery.

But this spring the ongoing nuptials-themed exhibit of costumes from movies and TV series, “Fashionable Romance: Wedding Gowns in Film,” has upped the ante during the estate’s most blooming time of year.

Appropriately, Barnhardt described the combination of the exhibit and the flower festival as a “happy marriage.”

“There’s really no way to separate the two events,” she said. “We want the floral part of this (costume) exhibit to be just as important as the gowns themselves. … It was great fun to take the movie themes and research the period of the story and study the flower designs from that era.”

Indeed, for every one of the more than a dozen movies, set from the 17th to the early 20th centuries, Barnhardt’s staff found the particular blooms and arrangements true to the time, then carefully constructed creations ranging from the chandeliers dripping with flower-tipped ribbons in the Banquet Hall to the delicate bridal bouquets accenting the wedding gowns.

“Whether the research is really apparent to our guests or not, it helps us to tell the story,” Barnhardt said.

Not that most visitors will be able to tell the difference, but many of the flowers have to be artificial, to protect the costumes and Biltmore’s furnishings. “There’s no way we’re going to climb up on the banquet table to change out the chandelier flowers every week,” Barnhardt said.

Indeed, even a simple arrangement of fresh-cut flowers set upon an antique table requires many layers of protection from spills, pollen, dropped petals and other hazards: a sheet of acid-free archival foam, a decorative runner on top of that, a wooden stand and then the vase. Only then come the flowers.

Fresh arrangements are changed out about once a week, Barnhardt said, typically on Thursdays or Fridays. Many flowers are cut on the estate, in season, and in its greenhouses. Others come from around Buncombe County and elsewhere, always as close to home as possible to support local growers and maintain peak freshness.

Of course, the freshest flowers are those still rooted outside or in the Conservatory, and those are the biggest draws to the annual Biltmore Blooms event.

“This is the time of year that we really focus on Frederick Law Olmsted’s contribution to the estate,” said Biltmore public relations manager Marissa Jamison, referring to the renowned landscape architect who worked with Biltmore’s owner, George Vanderbilt, in the 1890s to create not just the many gardens but all the landscaping on what was then an estate of 125,000 acres. (It’s 8,000 acres today.)

In addition to Olmsted’s legacy, “Biltmore Blooms celebrates what nature gives us and what our current team of gardeners and horticulturalists are continuing to do to preserve that vision,” Jamison said.

The celebration, which runs March 19-May 26, includes many special events, such as Sparkling Romance, a bubbly new seminar at the Winery; two free demonstrations daily at A Gardener’s Place behind and below the Conservatory; grape stomps for kids from 2-5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays in Antler Hill Village; and the return of A Moveable Feast, starting with a dinner to be served al fresco in a new location called Cedric’s Garden the evening of April 30 (reservations required).

For those anxious to get started, a festive tasting of this year’s spring wine — a rosé crafted from grapes from the 2015 estate harvest — will be 6-7 p.m. March 18 at the Winery Clock Tower. (It’s $20 a person and does not require purchase of an estate admission ticket; call 800-411-3812 for reservations.)

There’s always something going on at Biltmore, even if it’s just the changing of the seasons, and the setting engenders both loyalty and affection in employees. Some floral staffers worked part-time for the estate as long as a decade while waiting for a full-time opportunity, Barnhardt said.

“I’m working on my 39th year here at Biltmore,” she added. “I love where I work. Just driving in every morning — it’s so beautiful.”

BLOOMS BY THE NUMBERS

• 200 orchids in bloom in the Conservatory

15,000+ daffodils across the estate

74,000+ tulips across the estate

3-4 weeks tulips remain in bloom

5 tulip colors in the Walled Garden: purple, blush, white, yellow and orange

4 acres in the Walled Garden

75 acres of landscaped gardens across the estate

80 fresh and faux flower arrangements in Biltmore House

3,200 fresh and faux roses refreshed each week in “Fashionable Romance” exhibit

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

When the flowers appear during Biltmore Blooms:

March: Daffodils all over; early color in the Shrub Garden and Azalea Garden; regional favorites such as lenten rose, false Solomon’s seal and trillium bloom.

April: Tulips at peak; lilacs and forsythias in the Spring Garden; wisteria begins to bloom; the Azalea Garden is in its prime through the end of May.

May: Everything in the Spring Garden is in bloom: pink lady’s slippers, mayapples, flowering quince, sweet shrub, mock orange, azaleas, rhododendrons, beauty bush and more; 200 varieties bloom in the historic Rose Garden.

• Regular updates: Find out what’s currently flowering with weekly bloom reports from Parker Andes, the estate’s director of horticulture, at Biltmore.com/bloomreport.

Guests explore the banquet hall of the Biltmore HouseBuy PhotoGuests explore the many rooms of the Biltmore HouseBuy PhotoA display of the dress worn by Gwyneth Paltrow in theBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Julie Christie in Hamlet isBuy PhotoOutfits worn by Kate Winslet and Alan Rickman in theBuy PhotoGuests travel up and down the staircase of the BiltmoreBuy PhotoThe winter garden in at the Biltmore House surroundsBuy PhotoThe winter garden in at the Biltmore House surroundsBuy PhotoThe winter garden in at the Biltmore House surroundsBuy PhotoOutfits worn in the movie Daniel Deronda are on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Juliet Aubrey in the film BertieBuy PhotoOutfits worn in the film Wallis  Edward are on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by Helena Bonham Carter in Mary Shelley'sBuy PhotoA dress worn in the film Daniel Deronda is on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Joely Richardson in the filmBuy PhotoFashionable Romance:  Wedding Gowns in Film is onBuy PhotoA dress worn by Helena Mitchell in the film The DeceiversBuy PhotoA dress worn by Helena Mitchell in the film The DeceiversBuy PhotoA dress worn by Helena Mitchell in the film The DeceiversBuy PhotoA dress worn by Helena Mitchell in the film The Deceivers,Buy PhotoDresses worn in the film Howard's End are on displayBuy PhotoDresses worn in the film Howard's End are on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn in the film Howard's End is on displayBuy PhotoOutfits worn by Kate Winslet and Alan Rickman in theBuy PhotoOutfits worn by Ralph Fiennes and Keira Knightly inBuy PhotoThe table in the banquet hall of the Biltmore HouseBuy PhotoDresses worn by Keira Knightly in the film The DuchessBuy PhotoDresses worn by Keira Knightly in the film The DuchessBuy PhotoDresses worn by Keira Knightly in the film The DuchessBuy PhotoThe winter garden in at the Biltmore House surroundsBuy PhotoThe winter garden in at the Biltmore House surroundsBuy PhotoFashionable Romance:  Wedding Gowns in Film is onBuy PhotoFashionable Romance:  Wedding Gowns in Film is onBuy PhotoDresses worn by Keira Knightly in the film The DuchessBuy PhotoA dress worn by Keira Knightly in the film The DuchessBuy PhotoFlowers hang from a chandelier in the Banquet HallBuy PhotoA dress worn by Keira Knightly in the film The DuchessBuy PhotoAn outfit worn by Ralph Fiennes is on display in theBuy PhotoFlowers hang from a chandelier in the Banquet HallBuy PhotoFashionable Romance:  Wedding Gowns in Film is onBuy PhotoFashionable Romance:  Wedding Gowns in Film is onBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Emma Thompson in the film SenseBuy PhotoFashionable Romance:  Wedding Gowns in Film is onBuy PhotoA dress worn in the film Howard's End is on displayBuy PhotoDresses worn in the film Pride and Prejudice are onBuy PhotoDresses worn in the film Pride and Prejudice are onBuy PhotoDresses worn in the film Pride and Prejudice are onBuy PhotoDresses worn in the film Pride and Prejudice are onBuy PhotoDresses worn in the film Pride and Prejudice are onBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Jennifer Ehle in the film PrideBuy PhotoOutfits worn in the film Pride and Prejudice are onBuy PhotoOutfits worn int he film Out of Africa are on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by Meryl Streep in the film Out of AfricaBuy PhotoA dress worn by Meryl Streep in the film Out of AfricaBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Julie Christie in the filmBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Julie Christie in the filmBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Madeline Stowe in the filmBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Madeline Stowe in the filmBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Billie Piper in the film MansfieldBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Frances O'Connor is on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Frances O'Connor is on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Frances O'Connor is on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Frances O'Connor is on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Frances O'Connor is on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Frances O'Connor is on displayBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Gwyneth Paltrow in the filmBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Geraldine Somerville is onBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Billie Piper in the film MansfieldBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Elizabeth Hurley in the filmBuy PhotoA dress worn by actress Geraldine Somerville is onBuy Photo

 

Article source: http://www.citizen-times.com/story/entertainment/2016/03/16/biltmore-blooms-marries-gown-exhibit-happy-union/81578552/

New boulevard rules get first OK from council

Curbside gardens moved a step closer to being legal in Sioux Falls when the City Council on Tuesday preliminarily approved new rules aimed at loosening regulations that limit boulevards to sod and trees.

For years, city ordinance has restricted what can be placed in boulevard parking strips – the space between a street and sidewalk. Flowers, fruits, vegetables and just about everything else was off limits. But for nearly as long, city code enforcers have looked the other way as more and more residents adorned their parking strips with a variety plantings, rocks, mulch and other landscaping features.

Not wanting rules on the books that go unenforced, a group of city councilors have worked for nearly a year to bring the bulk of those scofflaw gardeners into compliance by crafting new rules that will allow plantings no taller than three feet high to be grown in the boulevards. The proposal Tuesday night earned unanimous approval from the City Council and now heads to a second and final reading next month.

“Clearly there are more important things to do in our city but it’s important for us to have ordinances on the books that we actually support and are willing to enforce,” Councilor Greg Jamison said.

While the proposal gives property owners more liberties when it comes to boulevard landscaping, the new rules would maintain a handful of restrictions. Aside from the height limitations, thorned, spined or sharp plants would be barred along with shrubs or other woody deciduous plants. Turf or sod grass would still have to be kept to eight inches or less and a three-foot radius around fire hydrants would need to be kept.

Non-plant materials like asphalt, concrete, pavement, boulders and gravel will continue to be off-limits. Landscaping elements like splash guards, rock mulch, edging and pavers would only be allowed by permit from the city engineer.

The City Council is scheduled to make its final vote on the proposal and take more public input April 5 at Carnegie Town Hall.

“This has been a true collaboration between councilors, between city staff, concerned citizens, landscapers, … the garden clubs and even conservationists,” said Councilor Rick Kiley, chairman of the Land Use Committee that spent months taking public input on what the new boulevard rules should look like. “They were requesting flexibility, and I think we’ve given them flexibility and, at the same time, maintained the functionality of the right of way.”

Article source: http://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2016/03/15/new-boulevard-rules-get-first-ok-council/81811252/

Event center in full bloom: San Francisco Flower and Garden Show highlights drought-tolerance


Samantha Weigel/Daily Journal
Landscape designer and ecologist Billy Krimmel shows off his garden display made entirely of native-California plant species while setting up for this year’s San Francisco Flower and Garden Show that runs through Sunday at the San Mateo County Event Center.

Landscape architect Iftikhar Ahmed said he was influenced by Spanish and Italian designs while working on his ‘Urban Oasis’ display.

Whether you’re stumped by what to do with your backyard, passionate about creating drought tolerant landscapes or in need of some artistic inspiration, this year’s San Francisco Flower and Garden Show has something for everyone.

The San Mateo County Event Center has been transformed into a lush landscaped wonderland courtesy of some of the best green-thumbed gurus as the 31st annual show runs Wednesday through Sunday.

This year’s event features dozens of spectacularly unique and drought-friendly garden displays, more than 125 speakers from across the country offering up their expertise, hundreds of plants for sale and the first hands-on “Do It Yourself” booth.

Other exciting urban homesteading activities include creating bee hotels, learning how to propagate plants, experimenting with fermented drinks and tips for gardening in small spaces, said garden show producer Sherry Larsen.

Textures, colors and scents are alive at the various garden displays where West Coast landscape designers are seeking to inspire and motivate. With the drought still in the forefront of everyone’s mind, Larsen said the five-day event is an excellent opportunity for people to learn how to adapt in style.

“Last year everybody let everything die and now they’ve got to figure out what to do with their lawns. So here you’ll find other ways to enjoy your yard,” Larsen said, excited about the show’s first DIY booth. “It’s to do things instead of just seeing things. Once you get that activity in somebody’s hands, it takes away the mystique of it and then they can go home and expand on it.”

Got a garden dilemma? There will be low-cost consultations with experts and plenty of plants to take home.

Landscapers have spent days preparing to wow this year’s judges with elaborate designs that instill a sense of walking through a Mediterranean estate, not being inside an event center hall. Even if one can’t replicate these artful masterpieces at home, Larsen noted “there’s elements that can go into every yard.”

Landscape architect Benjamin Goulart, owner of the Menlo Park-based Waterfall Guy Goulart Designs, agreed conservation can be beautiful and suggests creative features such as dry creeks and waterfalls using recycled water. Common garden themes now include sticking with California native species or Mediterranean plants that offer a tropical flair while flourishing in the Bay Area’s climate, Goulart said.

Traditional grassscapes can often use 50 to 100 gallons of water per irrigation but “if you plant drought-tolerant plants, you’re probably looking at 50 gallons a week tops, depending on what types of plants you look at. So you can literally cut your water usage down to a quarter,” Goulart said, noting dry creek beds require nothing and recycled water features typically use just a gallon a day.

With local water utilities typically offering rebates for turf removal and more Bay Area residents investing in their homes instead of trying to relocate in the region’s competitive housing market, Goulart said the annual event offers a great opportunity for inspiration.

Billy Krimmel, who holds a Ph.D. in ecology and is the founder of Restoration Landscaping Company, said he’s all about promoting the science of ecosystems through beautiful urban yards.

Krimmel’s creation at this week’s event focuses on sticking to your roots — California’s roots that is. The young landscaper constructed a subtle pond to show where dragonflies like to breed and 70 California-native plant species to illustrate how property owners can give back to nature.

“Front yards are where people engage with nature on a day-to-day basis. So the two missions we have at the company are telling these [scientific] stories and bringing it to people to restore habitat,” Krimmel said. Front yards are “the next frontier for conservation. Pristine areas are less than 1 percent of our land use, cities are more than half. So when people are spending money on landscaping, they can make it beautiful with native plants, just as good as non-native ones, and it can be more than decoration, it can do some good too.”

Landscape architect Iftikhar Ahmed, a principal at Treeline Designz, said conservationists can play with a variety of textures, colors and plants that bloom year round. Taking inspiration from Spanish and Italian designs, Ahmed’s “Urban Oasis” is a functional eco-friendly work of art.

With offices from San Francisco to Vancouver, Ahmed said using water wisely is a top priority for many clients and a great habitat to showcase.

“They’re more [focused] on drought tolerance, which is one of our specialties, to work on sustainable, energy-efficient and drought-tolerant gardens. Because of the drought, even if we have a couple months rain, it’s not enough to finish the drought,” Ahmed said. “We need to concentrate on the drought and instead of painting on lawns and pavers, we can play around with drought-tolerant species that don’t need a lot of physical work.”

The San Francisco Flower and Garden Show runs 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 16, through Saturday, March 19, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, March 20, at the San Mateo County Event Center, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Tickets are $22 for adults, $20 for seniors and free for children 16 years and younger. Visit www.sfgardenshow.com for more information.

samantha@smdailyjournal.com

(650) 344-5200 ext. 106

Article source: http://www.smdailyjournal.com/articles/lnews/2016-03-16/event-center-in-full-bloom-san-francisco-flower-and-garden-show-highlights-drought-tolerance/1776425160145.html

Spring gardening tips from master gardeners


Posted Mar. 16, 2016 at 2:01 AM


Wayne, N.Y.

Article source: http://www.waynepost.com/news/20160316/spring-gardening-tips-from-master-gardeners