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Archives for March 15, 2016

Owasso Chamber, vendors take part in Tulsa Home … – Tulsa World

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L to R: Jason Drake with Drake Chiropractic; Karl Fritschen, Chief Urban and Long Range Planner; Dr. Paula Willyard, Dean of Community Campuses, Tulsa Community College; and Skip Mefford, Owasso RCB Bank President, working in the Owasso Chamber’s booth during the Tulsa Home Garden Show on Friday, March 11. ART HADDAWAY/Owasso Reporter

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The show featured an expanded 14,000-square-foot garden display, created by 16 local landscaping companies, with the latest trends in outdoor design, such as water features, pergolas and landscaping material. ART HADDAWAY/Owasso Reporter




Posted: Monday, March 14, 2016 11:40 am

Owasso Chamber, vendors take part in Tulsa Home Garden Show

By Art Haddaway
News Editor

TulsaWorld.com

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0 comments

The Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa’s 2016 Home Garden Show – considered the largest home and garden trade products show in Oklahoma – took place on March 10-13 at the River Spirit Expo at Expo Square, where several vendors serving the Owasso area showcased their offerings (see PHOTO gallery).

The four-day event featured over 500 exhibitors across 363,000 square feet of exhibit space, offering ideas, expert advice and the latest product innovations for all things home and garden.

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    The Owasso Chamber of Commerce featured a booth (2009) near the main entrance, and other Owasso-related businesses included Owasso Fence, Overholt Heating Air, Chinowth Cohen Realtors, Anderson Pond Design, Dale Lee’s Service Inc., Anchor Paint Manufacturing Co., and DaVco Mechanical Contractors Inc.

    For over 30 years, the Owasso Chamber has participated in the Tulsa Home Garden Show, and this year, 40 Owasso volunteers from the Chamber as well as the city, schools and realty companies staffed the booth in three-hour increments. The organization’s presence at the show gave passersby a chance to visit the booth and inquire about Owasso and its many offerings.

    “The venue provides a great opportunity for us to learn from Owasso residents, and regional visitors, as to their likes, concerns and desires regarding Owasso,” said Chamber President Gary Akin. “It’s beneficial for our volunteers to learn firsthand the public’s thoughts and desires regarding Owasso – it’s very enlightening.”

    Akin said that the Chamber was able to connect with many people over the course of the show and provided beneficial and informative insight into what projects Owasso is undertaking and what goals the city has going forward. He stressed that over time, his conversations with the locals at the venue has continued to evolve, where he enjoys hearing about them and their feedback.

    “We had conversations with many people, provided current marketing material, promoted our city, and learned from our many contacts,” said Akin. “For many years, the major requests were for … retail outlets and restaurants. Today, most of our residents say they don’t have to leave Owasso for their shopping or dining. However, their desires have turned more toward better streets, traffic flow, traffic signalization, and ‘Quality of Life’ initiatives.”

    The 2016 Tulsa Home Garden Show gave vendors like the Owasso Chamber and other Owasso-related businesses an opportunity to inform the public of what’s trending in the community and the many opportunities available to them across the region. “Another show is in the books,” Akin added, “and I would say [this year] was a big success.”

    For more information on the annual event, visit www.tulsahba.

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      Article source: http://www.tulsaworld.com/owasso-chamber-vendors-take-part-in-tulsa-home-garden-show/article_94935d80-5da3-5add-966a-cc572e0a1576.html

      Terry Van Gorder, Knott’s visionary CEO, dies at 82

      BUENA PARK – Terry Van Gorder, Knott’s Berry Farm’s only CEO while it was family owned and operated and who led the effort to license “Peanuts” characters for Camp Snoopy and spearheaded the development of Bigfoot Rapids and the GhostRider wooden roller coaster, has died. He was 82.

      Van Gorder, chief executive officer of Knott’s from 1981 to 1998, died in his sleep at his home in Cottage Grove, Ore., on March 2.

      The Knott family hired Van Gorder, also the first chief executive at Magic Mountain, when there was little agreement among the children and grandchildren of Knott’s Berry Farm’s founders about the theme park’s direction. Knott‘s had grown over the years, since Mrs. Knott’s Chicken Dinner Restaurant opened in 1934, followed by Ghost Town seven years later.

      Van Gorder’s role as CEO made him a power broker of sorts, requiring him to navigate family politics and build consensus. He helped the park add roller coasters while maintaining Knott’s historical feel.

      “He had a vision for where we could fit into a changing market,” said Darrel Anderson, one of the Knotts’ grandsons who helped bring Van Gorder on board. “He had a much more sophisticated vision than we had.”

      Terry Ellis Van Gorder was born Aug. 19, 1933, in Palo Alto. After graduating from Yale University and four years in the U.S. Navy, Van Gorder worked as a general manager at a country club, a golf course architect, and eventually a senior vice president for the company that opened Magic Mountain in 1971.

      The Newhall Land Farming Co. pegged Van Gorder to be Magic Mountain’s top man, tasking him with building up a park that had few rides and unfinished landscaping.

      Van Gorder brought in Revolution, the first loop roller coaster since the 1920s, built a precursor to Camp Snoopy called Wizard’s Village, and ramped up marketing campaigns to increase Magic Mountain’s popularity.

      “He really believed children would lead the way, and he was absolutely right,” said Robin Hall, who worked with Van Gorder at Magic Mountain and became his vice president of design and architecture at Knott’s. “He was kind of a marketing genius.”

      He also brokered the sale of Magic Mountain to Six Flags in 1979 – which put him out of a job.

      Until Knott’s came calling.

      During his tenure, Van Gorder created the Dinosaur Kingdom attraction well before the film version of “Jurassic Park,” envisioned Supreme Scream, which takes guests 252 feet up and drops them at 50 mph, and helped give Knott’s Charles Schultz’s “Peanuts” gang.

      “That was a really big deal,” said Eric Lynxwiler, co-author of “Knott’s Preserved,” a book on Knott’s history. “Knott’s was missing that one key quality, a walk-around character for kids.”

      But, like he did with Magic Mountain, he paved the way for his own ouster – brokering the sale of Knott’s to Cedar Fair for $245 million in 1997.

      “I think Terry always felt he left ideas on the table,” Hall said. “But I think he was satisfied with the legacy he left. He realized his time with the Knott family had run its course.”

      Van Gorder is is survived by his wife, Elaine Roberts; his sister, Marian Wyckoff; his former wife, Priscilla Lowe; his son, Eric; his daughter, Catherine; and two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

      Contact the writer: 714-796-6979 or chaire@ocregister.com

      Article source: http://www.ocregister.com/articles/knott-708250-gorder-mountain.html

      During ‘spring-like’ weekend, homeowners get ideas at 2016 Home …

      WAUKESHA — Spring was in full bloom this weekend at the Waukesha Expo Center! With temperatures in the 50s this weekend, many were thinking spring, and beginning to brainstorm ideas for outdoor decorating.

      The Home, Garden and Landscape Show took place at the Waukesha Expo Center from Friday, February 26th through Sunday, February 28th.

      The show provided homeowners the opportunity to give their home improvement plans a jump start by browsing and brainstorming ideas — as more than 100 booth spaces were filled by local home improvement professionals.

      Carpetland USA Flooring Center was the lead sponsor of the 2016 Home, Garden and Landscape Show.

      Special appearances this weekend included Sharon Morrissey, gardening and horticulture expert on Sunday morning, Tom Feiza, Mr. Fix-It on Saturday afternoon and LeRoy Butler, former Green Bay Packers player on Saturday morning.

       

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      The show offered ideas for outdoor decorating — and indoor decorating for the whole house.

      “When it gets nice out, people start coming and talking,” Dave Aldrian with MCR Group said.

      The MCR Group offers designs to fit anyone’s needs — from simple landscaping to large-scale projects.

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      “It`s a large-scale construction project. It`s not just landscaping or planting. It`s full-blown engineered construction projects,” Aldrian said.

      It’s nearly March, and that means summer is just months away. So for many, it’s time to get the planning underway so they can enjoy their homes this summer.

      “Now is a good time. It`s a very good time,” Aldrian said.

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      That’s why Liz Shanahan drove all the way from Kenosha. She’s looking to improve her backyard.

      “The people that we bought the house from, they did half the landscaping and I want to finish it and add stuff they didn`t add already,” Shanahan said.

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      Shanahan is a new homeowner with big dreams.

      “I just want to make my little section of Kenosha more awesome,” Shanahan said.

      Shanahan said the warmer weather we saw this weekend in southeastern Wisconsin has her excited for spring and summer.

      “I mean, you can`t beat the weather in Wisconsin this time of year,” Shanahan said.

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      Home, Garden and Landscape Show

      Show directors said the warm weekend brought tons of people out to the show, and contractors believe the milder weather may have some thinking about getting started on outdoor projects sooner.

      “Oh yeah — and all the work I have to do!” Marc Schneider said.

      CLICK HERE to learn more about the Home, Garden and Landscape Show and upcoming events at the Waukesha Expo Center.

      Article source: http://fox6now.com/2016/02/28/during-spring-like-weekend-homeowners-get-ideas-at-2016-home-garden-and-landscape-show/

      THE DIRT ON GARDENING: Before you break out the shovel — stop!

      With spring just around the corner and anticipation running high to go full steam ahead to dig into some soil, STOP!

      Maybe first in order would be a general clean-up of yards and garden areas from recent wind storms. Some yards I’ve seen look rather dismal with branches strewn helter-skelter everywhere, including the golf course I play. It took days to clean up a glut of twigs and large branches there with the hundreds of trees on the course. A brisk raking is always a good start for a healthier and more beautiful lawn as well.

      Things are actually looking pretty good for an earlier than normal “roust in the garden” but experience tells us “It ain’t over ‘til it’s over,” so let’s wait at least another month before we test the soil for dig-ability. Remember the soil test? Grab a fist-full of dirt and form a ball; if it stays in a wet sticky ball, it’s not yet ready. If it crumbles easily then it’s OK to plant.

      While you mull that over, remember also that March typically isn’t an OK month in our zone to be thinking a whole lot about planting stuff. Our weather has been anything but perfect so far (albeit not bad) with its on-again-off-again snow and ice, then 60 degrees, then in the teens or less. In other words, “Old Mother Nature hasn’t quite made up her mind yet.”

      Once your early chores have been accomplished, why not focus on some changes that you might have been thinking about doing for the coming planting season.

      Have you been contemplating on making a change to your gardening area this year? Maybe a raised-bed garden would fit handsomely into your landscaping scheme. There are many books that can be purchased to develop this type of garden. I’ll give you a few tips from my own experience and if you want to expand on that then I’d consider purchasing one of the many books available.

      If you desire a neat and compact garden then a raised bed will fit perfectly into your design, especially for city folks who have limited space and want it to “fit.” Actually, they are quite easy to make and require little assembly so nearly anyone can do this. A couple things that will make things easier to maintain it are to keep them narrow so that weeding and harvesting are simple.

      It isn’t a hard-and-fast rule, however, because you can do as I did and make a simple path through the center of a 8-foot wide garden by placing slabs of limestone or other man-made flat stone in order to accomplish the same thing. If I’d had mine to do over I would have opted to make several 2- or 3-feet wide areas rather than one 8-foot wide by 16-foot long garden. Let’s say you make three gardens 3-by-16 feet long and keep enough space between them to run a lawnmower through. This will give you approximately 150 square feet of planting area or about the same as a 10-by-15-foot garden.

      Use 2-by-6-inch treated lumber with appropriate lengths (preferably without splicing) to maximize strength. Tie them together with galvanized nails of sufficient length or use galvanized corner braces.

      Another option, which I used, is to assemble landscape timbers (also treated and readily available at lumber outlets) by placing them 2 high (Lincoln Log style and overlapped at the corners) and driving galvanized landscape nails to “tie” them together. Use equal parts of rich black organic soil, organic cow manure, and organic peat for your growing medium and for optimum results.

      Article source: http://www.goshennews.com/news/lifestyles/the-dirt-on-gardening-before-you-break-out-the-shovel/article_168a5482-b143-5873-adfa-18d99a5a4b77.html

      Tressa Chadwick to give program on drought-tolerant plants



      Tressa Chadwick, owner of Johnny’s Nursery in Redlands, will present a program on drought-tolerant plants when the Redlands Horticultural and Improvement Society meets at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Church of the Nazarene, 1307 E. Citrus Ave., Redlands.

      Drought-tolerant plants have been used as an integral element in gardens and landscaping for hundreds of years. Some of the earliest examples could be found in fifth- and sixth-century Persian gardens and in 13th-century Moorish gardens, where water played a primary role in the gardens’ design and function.

      Since water was in short supply in those dry, hot climates, it was managed with care. People chose plants that functioned best under low-water conditions while at the same time helped to create an oasis-like environment.

      Southern California homeowners can apply this principal by using drought-tolerant trees, shrubs and groundcovers in their gardens and landscapes.

      Chadwick’s program will cover how to save water by landscaping with drought-tolerant plants.

      Door prizes at the meeting will include plants, gift certificates and things from the Redlands Horticultural and Improvement Society plant yard and from Johnny’s Nursery.

      For information, go to redlandsgardenclub.com.

      Source: Redlands Horticultural and Improvement Society

      Article source: http://www.redlandsdailyfacts.com/lifestyle/20160314/tressa-chadwick-to-give-program-on-drought-tolerant-plants

      Utility And Community Solar Should Use Native Landscaping …

      Clean Power
      Solar-farm-in-Walworth-County-Wisconsin

      Published on March 15th, 2016
      by Guest Contributor

      2

      March 15th, 2016 by  

      By Jeffrey S. Briberg, LPG, REM

      Over the next three years rural and exurban landowners will convert a small but meaningful percentage of marginal land from row crops to solar fields and community solar gardens. As this transition happens, choosing a diverse native landscape for these solar sites will provide clean, renewable energy, and also provide important storm water management. Noting the numerous co-benefits of vegetative ground cover on solar sites, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently began a three-year study to document best practices and help meet SunShot cost and deployment targets.

      A native landscape is one planted with a diverse mix of multiple species of low-lying deep-rooted grasses, flowers, and sedges instead of using gravel or a monocrop of a shallow-rooted non-native plant species, like turf grass. Ecologists have proven that increasing plant richness by the addition of legumes and forbs to the traditional grasses enhances the functional diversity and stacks benefits provided by these systems.

      Native Landscapes for Improved Storm Water Management

      One of the services WSB provides to clients is to conduct site layout/design, vegetation establishment and management plans, and storm water modeling that meets storm water regulations. We ran Hydro CAD model runoff calculations for a range of flow conditions for a typical 2 MW project that is converting 8 acres of cropland to a solar site using a native landscape (low mow grasses plus clover in the service lanes, shade-tolerant grasses with seven flowering plants behind the panels).

      The model uses the assumption that we build 1.2 acres of impervious service roads, 50 percent of the panel area is impervious surface (an assumption required by some state agencies even though all the space around and under the panels is a permanently vegetated, pervious surface), and 100 percent pervious surfaces with perennial plantings for all lanes, buffers etc. This condition is compared with a baseline of cropland that is barren of vegetation from mid-October to mid-May, compared to low-cut, shallow-rooted turf grass, and compared to a deep-rooted native plant mix.

      The storm water runoff is reduced 23 percent for the 2-year storm (2.9 inches of rain) and 8 percent for the 100-year storm (7.8 inches of rain). The runoff reduction is dependent on soil types, slopes and existing land cover, but, we find these results are very typical.

      We believe the actual results will be better than the model suggests because the panels are not actually impervious, they just focus the drainage long a drip-line at the bottom of the panels where the deep rooted perennial vegetation allows infiltration whenever the ground is not frozen (see Hydrologic Response of Solar Farms, Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, May 2013 for hydrographs and additional research).

      Further, we expect a mix of prairie plants to provide superior hydrologic performance compared to monocrop turf-grasses that are common on solar sites in some areas of the country. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey completed a five-year storm water study in cooperation with a consortium of 19 cities and towns in the area of Madison, Wisconsin that revealed “striking differences between turf and prairie vegetation.” The study found “prairie vegetation had greater median infiltration rates than those with turf grass,” and roots in the prairie vegetation plot were “found to a depth of 4.7 feet compared with 0.46 feet in the turf.”

      In addition to superior storm water management, native plants improve the soil with organic matter over the 20 to 30-year life the project, allowing microorganisms and soil fauna to recover after years of intensive compaction, pesticide and fertilizer application. And, over time, native plants out-compete weeds allowing ground cover to be maintained with just a single annual mow, reducing operating costs.

      The growth of solar installations nationwide can have other positive benefits besides clean power and reduction of greenhouse gasses. Flood attenuation from storm events and water quality improvements are something every community needs.

      As an increasing number of solar projects are built in areas that receive significant annual rainfall — and considering that the trend is for individual storms to increase in intensity over the next 20 years — using native landscapes for storm water management will reduce uncertainty and operational costs, while providing additional secondary benefits.

      Jeffrey Broberg is a licensed professional geologist, and registered environmental manager for WSB Associates of Rochester, Minnesota. He is a board member of Fresh Energy, an independent energy nonprofit. 
       
      Get CleanTechnica’s 1st (completely free) electric car report → “Electric Cars: What Early Adopters First Followers Want.”
       
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      Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

       

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      is many, many people. We publish a number of guest posts from experts in a large variety of fields. This is our contributor account for those special people. 😀


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      • To reinforce James, won’t ‘going native’ support (at least somewhat) biodiversity and the indigenous fauna?

      • I’ve been banging on about this for a while, often advertising superior British practice. It’s good to see a more influential professional weighing in.

        Natural planting also supports bumblebees, which are valuable crop pollinators as honeybees have increasing problems. Also birds. Poultry and sheep are kept on British solar farms. In hotter climates, shade-tolerant vegetables can be grown. Anything is better than the bulldozed car park model.

      Article source: https://cleantechnica.com/2016/03/15/utility-and-community-solar-should-use-native-landscaping/

      Gardening: Test those seeds you saved with simple germination tips

      Gardening-Seed Testing

      Gardening-Seed Testing

      In this Tuesday, March 1, 2016 photo, this assortment of leftover vegetable and flower seeds, in a Langley, Wash., hobby greenhouse, awaits a germination test. Some seeds remain viable for just a year while others will sprout after being stored three years or more. (Dean Fosdick via AP)



      Posted: Monday, March 14, 2016 6:15 pm

      Gardening: Test those seeds you saved with simple germination tips

      Associated Press |

      If you save seeds, you might wonder whether those from last year are still viable. A quick and easy pre-season seed germination test can answer that question.

      Much depends on how the seeds were collected and stored, said Ross Penhallegon, an associate professor emeritus and horticulturist with the Oregon State University College of Agricultural Sciences.

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      Article source: http://www.dailyprogress.com/lifestyles/gardening-test-those-seeds-you-saved-with-simple-germination-tips/article_c0a4f71a-e7e1-11e5-bef8-2fb511a15f0a.html

      Jack Christensen’s garden tips for the week starting Feb. 27 – The Pasadena Star



      1. Mealtime for avocados: Feed avocado trees in March and again in June. Apply just under 5 cups of 16-16-16 plant food, or 10 cups of 10-10-10 fertilizer around the drip zone of each mature tree each time you feed. And any time you apply plant food, be sure to thoroughly water it in right away, or let the rain do it for you. Yes, we are still looking forward to the arrival of those great El Niño rain storms.

      2. Cut back: Prune hibiscus and other evergreen shrubbery as needed, especially if it was damaged by winds or frost over the winter. Hibiscus grows quickly, so it’s OK to cut overgrown plants back quite a bit. Trim others to keep them in shape or get them out of the way. Trimming away wayward twigs and whole stems (rather than hedge-shearing) produces a more attractive, natural-looking plant.

      3. Spring into action: Get prepared for the great awakening that happens each spring as dormant plants come back to life. Have your lawnmower tuned up and the mower blades sharpened. Check and organize basic gardening tools. Sharpen shovel and hoe blades. Sharpen and oil pruning equipment. That makes it easier to keep your landscape looking its best.

      4. Place for pansies: Even though pansies flower longest when they are planted August, we can still plant them now and enjoy them for several months. Choose from the traditional, large, funny-faced hybrids to the single-colored, faceless types, down to the tiny Johnny Jump-ups. Plant them in composted soil in a sunny spot in the garden — where loved ones and friends can see them and smile as they walk by. And don’t hesitate to pick some for table decorations, because the more you pick, the more they’ll bloom.

      5. Timing citrus: Many orange and tangerine varieties ripened earlier than usual this season and have started falling off the trees, but tangelos could use a few more weeks to reach their best flavor. Grapefruit is still a bit puckery, but it’s good and juicy now. Harvest these gems as you need them, leaving the little green “star” on the fruit as you cut it off the tree with pruning clippers. That helps them last longer after harvesting.

      Article source: http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/lifestyle/20160311/jack-christensens-garden-tips-for-the-week-starting-feb-27

      Your garden in March: Sean Murray’s latest tips for North East gardeners

      A good range of gardening books can help increase your level of knowledge, act as a reference and help fire your imagination no matter what your level of gardening experience. If you’re a keen gardener you are probably already absorbing all of the amazing gardening images available at our fingertips from the internet, whether it be Pinterest or social media.

      I am increasingly using a combination of photographs taken on my mobile and a notebook as a means of rapidly capturing ideas and cataloguing sources of gardening design inspiration.

      I often like to retreat from the electronic age and take comfort in a good old gardening book. The Romans were consulting gardening books centuries ago on how best to tie in their grapevines. Every year I still have to read up on how to prune our wisteria and think I should know this by now. My wife says it’s an age thing.

      At times you can’t beat the feel of a gardening book, even better if it’s secondhand, the more well-loved and mustier the better. Charity shops are a great thrifty source of them and I love it when I open one and inside is a handwritten note on the sleeve or even a plant label from the previous owner tucked inside. I can’t help but feel a connection with its previous owner and wondering what kind of garden they had.

      I was recently asked where I had gathered my knowledge – gardening books was the quick reply. I started early and have a copy of Gardening in the Shade by Margery Fish from 1964, I was one year old when it was published and I still refer to it.

      Gardening books contain invaluable knowledge - these are part of Sean Murray's collection
      Gardening books contain invaluable knowledge – these are part of Sean Murray’s collection

      At the age of 11 I was reading about how to cultivate a show chrysanthemum and soon went on to write my first article on the subject for the school magazine, much to the mockery of many of my peers. That didn’t put me off and I continued to collect gardening books.

      If you’re new to gardening, a book that covers factual tips, such as what to do in your garden each month, how to prune and where to place each plant is a good start.

      The Gardening Year from Readers Digest can still be found and meets the bill perfectly. My copy is very shabby, but like an old trusty friend is there when I need it for reference.

      Some books can really get you in the mood to get you out into the garden, Carol Klein’s Life in a Cottage Garden and Beth Chatto’s The Dry Garden and The Damp Garden series are factual and easily get you fired up to tackle the jobs you’ve long delayed.

      For simple amusement try Dear Friend and Gardener, Letters on Life and Gardening, Beth Chatto and Christopher Lloyd, 1998, knowledge wrapped up in delicious wit, wisdom and humour as these two horticultural icons banter in letters to one another on all things gardening.

      My latest purchase, Garden Design, a Book of Ideas by Heidi Howcroft and Marinne Majerus is full of terrific glossy photographs and pure inspiration. Inspiration is important if you really want your garden to develop and feel alive. This book is my fall asleep and first morning read or maybe I should say “look” as I just love the pictures.

      Not cheap at £35, it will be at my side for years to come. “It’s an investment”, I tell my wife as she raises an eyebrow. But hey, my wife buys handbags and I buy books. I’ve just counted my gardening book collection and all 109 of them make me very happy. Take a leaf out of my book, or maybe even add one as a page marker, and start your own collection now.

      Sean Murray runs a garden design company based in Ashington, Northumberland, www.gardennarratives.co.uk

      Article source: http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/property-news/your-garden-march-sean-murrays-11036553