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Archives for March 8, 2016

Read up on the Lents Branch Library update


Even though the new Lents Branch Library doesn’t have a builder yet, the walls are bursting at the seams.

“I have 50,000 square feet of ideas to fit into a 12,000 to 15,000 square foot library,” said Carrie Herrmann, director of Boone County Public Library.

The new branch is slated to open in 2017. The library will be located in Hebron on Ky. 237 near Cardinal Way.

The old Lents Branch building is currently for sale.

“One of the reasons I’m up to so many ideas is that I’m getting emails and calls from the community,” Herrmann said.

Herrmann is always open to new ideas and her librarians are also happy to oblige. When one of them sees a public space or library idea they enjoy, they send it her way.

Inside the library, there will be conference and study rooms, and plenty of space for programming for people of all ages.

“We need meeting rooms in that area. They’re constantly in use,” Herrmann said. “Sometimes it’s hard to find rooms for library programs.”

Herrmann is making sure the outside is just as full as the inside. They would like to have interactive learning spaces on the property, like story walks and an amphitheater.

Having an eco-friendly building is important as well, Herrmann would like the building to be LEED certified or a Living Building project. On top of applying for a grant to get solar panels installed they’re also making sure the asphalt is water-permeable so it can provide an irrigation system for landscaping.

The library board is currently sorting through applications for an architect. Choosing the architect also means choosing the design and engineering firms. Herrmann said they received plenty of proposals, so the process is taking longer than expected.

The library will cost an estimated $160.37 per square foot, according to the Lents Branch Relocation FAQ on the BCPL website.

“We want to make sure we have the right fit,” Herrmann said.

If you have an idea for the new library branch, send an email to Carrie Herrmann at director@bcpl.org.

Article source: http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/local/boone-county/2016/03/07/read-lents-branch-library-update/81452720/

The Crisis in American Entrepreneurship

To the extent that the current state of American entrepreneurship is facing a crisis, it is not in the rate of creation of high-growth potential startups or even in the initial funding of those firms, but instead in the potential of those firms to scale in a meaningful way over time, say researchers in a new report. Unlike a Google or an Apple, companies aren’t getting off the launchpad.
ENLARGE

America’s entrepreneurs are brimming with promising ideas. But they appear to be struggling to transform innovations and insights into successful companies with broad reach.

That’s the conclusion of new research and a policy brief from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Catherine Fazio, Jorge Guzman, Fiona Murray and Scott Stern.

“To the extent that the current state of American entrepreneurship is facing a crisis, it is not in the rate of creation of high-growth potential startups or even in the initial funding of those firms, but instead in the potential of those firms to scale in a meaningful way over time,” the authors said.

The findings build on—but also differ in key ways from—a body of research showing a long-term decline for U.S. startups. Such a dropoff in business dynamism has serious implications for the economy, which historically has relied on fast-growing new companies to challenge older, less efficient firms, create new jobs, help diffuse new technology and spur productivity.

Think of Amazon and eBay’s impact on retail, Craiglist on publishing or Google on Internet search, computing and other information services.

While other literature has documented a steady decline in overall startups, including high-tech, the MIT research finds no meaningful dropoff in high-tech entrepreneurship. But how do you identify the next Google or Apple—companies that are now 17 and 40 years old?

Messrs. Guzman and Stern devised new methods. The authors eschew government figures on firm creation and destruction. Instead, they created their own measures of entrepreneurial quality, starting with state-level business licensing. Such data shows a strong correlation between certain startup characteristics and the probability of growth. For example, firms named after their founder are less likely to see any growth (Bob Smith’s Landscaping). Firms with a patent and a Delaware registration are 196 times more likely to grow.

“Registering in Delaware or filing for a patent will not guarantee a growth outcome for a new business, but the firms that have historically engaged in those activities have been associated with skewed growth outcomes,” the authors write.

Those kinds of firms—ones positioning themselves for innovation-led growth—are enjoying somewhat of a heyday. While there is a strong degree of cyclicality, the overall trend has been one of steady firm creation.

But those companies aren’t getting off the launchpad. According to Messrs. Guzman and Stern’s definition—in this research an initial public offering or acquisition at a multiple of the firm’s valuation within six years—success is becoming rarer. (In their research, the median acquisition price was $77 million, ranging from a minimum of $11.9 million at the fifth percentile to $1.92 billion at the 95th percentile.)

“Much more worrisome than the rate of creation of high-growth potential firms is the decline in the U.S. ability to accelerate the growth of new businesses conditional on initial quality…which has been falling since the late 1990s and only recently, and mildly, begun to recover. Even as the number of new ideas and potential for innovation is increasing, there seems to be a reduction in the ability of startups to scale in a meaningful and systematic way. Whether this is primarily a challenge for capital markets, or reflects systematic reductions in various aspects of ecosystem efficiency remains an important challenge for both future research and policy intervention.”

What’s to be done? The policy prescription isn’t entirely clear. For the innovative, potentially high-growth companies, the authors suggest efforts to help them scale up. But there doesn’t appear to be a single solution to meet the varying needs of an American entrepreneurial class that ranges from a small mom-and-pop shops to the next would-be Facebook.

RELATED

What Happened to the Breakout Startup?

The Missing Startup Recovery

Why It Matters That New Businesses Are Creating Jobs More Slowly Than a Decade Ago

Article source: http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2016/03/07/%EF%BB%BFthe-crisis-in-american-entrepreneurship/

At ward meeting, small issues get heard

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BATAVIA — As a meeting of first and sixth ward residents broke up Saturday, Councilperson Paul Viele raised one more issue.

“What do you think about the executive raises?” Viele asked to a gathering whose initial shrugs turned to support of his opposing position when he gave more detail.

While it ended on a hot button issue for city council and about half of the two-hour ward meeting focused on ideas for a future police station and talk of sales tax agreements, the ward meeting hosted by Viele and County Legislator John Deleo had long spun into small but focused issues by Viele’s last question.

The kind that are obscured by debates like the one over department head salaries, or don’t get enough of a public airing, residents said.

Deer. The cable television contract. The number of buckets inside the mall to catch water from leaky ceilings.

Viele, who hopes to hold four or five more ward meetings in 2016, said the dozen people who attended the first gave him a good place to start from.

“It was great feedback on the police, deer and the mall,” Viele said afterward. “There’s a lot of questions to ask Jason and the council.”

Laurie Oltramari, a first ward resident and Batavia Business Improvement District director, explained the role of the special district and offered hopes that the police station won’t be designed as a Taj Mahal of law enforcement. As a group, the meeting ended up in roughly the same view as the city council took last month ­— the old station doesn’t work, Swan Street is the most likely option, but an alternative should be considered if viable.

“I trust the (police station) committee; they did their due diligence,” Oltramari said, but she said another project weighs on her mind. “I look at City Hall and see so much wasted space. My only worry about this new place, is this someone’s idea of a grand police station or efficient?

“We’ll get what we need,” Viele said.

Deleo deferred to Viele and Sixth Ward Councilperson Rose Mary Christian, who attended the meeting, on city issues, but said the sales tax decline is hitting everyone in the county. He mentioned that he will not likely be on the committee negotiating what share of revenue the city will get, but said he will be vocal on the issue.

“I’ll be in the background, (but if asked), I’ll say no. We’re going to keep it (as is),” Deleo said.

Gus Galliford wasn’t willing to stay in the background. He offered views on what he sees driving school expenses — the expansion of administrative positions; the 97 buckets he counted at the mall — “this is an embarrassment to the city of Batavia and the problem’s only getting worse”; and the proposed closure of Park Avenue — more people are crossing the street without incident at the Office for the Aging; but saved his most passionate comment to the deer.

He said the city, and the State Department of Environmental Conservation, are moving too slowly while a growing deer population destroy the landscaping and gardens of the first ward.

“We know where the problem is,” Galliford said. “We’re talking about a real problem, but unless you complain vehemently, it won’t be done.”

Article source: http://www.thedailynewsonline.com/bdn01/at-ward-meeting-small-issues-get-heard-20160308

Garden Club of IRC presents Flower Show at Hallstrom House

Flower Show Committee Members Rosemary Bittle, General Chairman Faye Estes, Helena Pearson, Kathie Althoff, Gail Baldree, Barb Cunningham, Marsha Woods, Deborah Leone, Susan Randle, Mary Graves, Renae Senn, Jan Schubert and Melba CampbellFlower Show Committee Members Rosemary Bittle, General Chairman Faye Estes, Helena Pearson, Kathie Althoff, Gail Baldree, Barb Cunningham, Marsha Woods, Deborah Leone, Susan Randle, Mary Graves, Renae Senn, Jan Schubert and Melba Campbell


Landscaping provided to Hallstrom House by the Garden Club. Robin Pelensky, Kathie Althoff, Michelle Jacobus and Renae Senn


Design by Renae Senn in the last Flower Show

By Linda Gillespie, Your Newsweekly Contributor

The Garden Club of Indian River is pleased to present a Standard Flower Show in a Public Building, “Turn of the Century Gardens to Groves at the Hallstrom Farmstead” at 1723 Old Dixie Hwy. SW, Vero Beach on Sat. March 19 from 2-6 p.m. and Sun. March 20 from 12-5 p.m. Entry admission is $10.

Forty-four designs consisting of European Period Designs of the Dutch and Flemish 17th and 18th Centuries, American Victorian, as well as American Traditional and Creative Design styles will be staged throughout the Hallstrom House. A video of the designs upstairs will be available for those patrons who do not wish to use the stairs.

Outdoors, under a tent will contain hundreds of beautiful Horticulture Exhibits. The public is invited to enter the Horticulture portions of the Flower Show with pre-registration by March 11. Entry forms are online at GardenClubOfIRC.org.

The Historical Society currently owns and maintains the beautiful home built by Axel Hallstrom in 1918. The Historical Hallstrom Farmstead began as the first pineapple plantation on 40 acres with 100,000 pineapples. With the Great Depression, the pineapple business collapsed. Citrus, the new farming crop in Florida, became Axel’s new endeavor replacing the pineapple.

The Garden Club of IRC was awarded the best “Standard Home Flower Show” by the National Garden Club, Inc. for “An Island in Time,” which was presented to the public in 2014.

All the new landscaping at the Hallstrom House was recently provided to the Historical Society by the Garden Club of IRC as one of our many civic projects. The beautiful landscape was designed by garden club member Robin Pelensky, Surlaterre Landscape Architecture and installed by DIGG Gardens.

The Garden Club of IRC is a member of the National Garden Club, Inc. and the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, Inc. For additional information visit GardenClubOfIRC.org or 772-567-4602.

Article source: http://www.tcpalm.com/yournews/indian-river-county/garden-club-of-irc-presents-flower-show-at-hallstrom-house-2c98fd4b-559f-169e-e053-0100007fe212-371288081.html

Gardening for March 8 through March 14

Posted: Monday, March 7, 2016 6:03 pm

Gardening for March 8 through March 14

The Daily Progress staff reports

The Daily Progress

» Virginia Native Plant Society — Jefferson Chapter hosts Nathan Miller presenting “Landscaping with Native Plants” from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at the Education Building at Ivy Creek Natural Area at 1780 Earlysville Road. vnps.org/Jefferson. (434) 973-7772.

» Tufton Farm holds Summer Vegetable Planting, a two-hour, hands-on workshop, from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. Participants will start seeds from the Monticello gardens to take home. The workshop also will be offered on March 19. $28. monticello.org. (434) 984-9800.

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Article source: http://www.dailyprogress.com/lifestyles/gardening-for-march-through-march/article_6bc98e64-e240-11e5-a7bd-2b71a9457c20.html

Famous Marin duck starts giving government-required duck lessons

Duck expert professor Jim Cunningham (middle) of Dominican College teaches elementary students about ducks  at Bello Gardens Senior Home in San Anselmo. Photo: Liz Hafalia Elizabeth Hafalia, The Chronicle

Juanita the duck, who has been ordered by the U.S. government to be educational or go back into custody, ate 15 worms in San Anselmo on Monday as educationally as she could.

Article source: http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Famous-Marin-duck-starts-giving-6875786.php

This week’s gardening tips: Pond cleaning and rose planting

Now is a good time to clean out your aquatic garden if there is a thick layer of gunk on the bottom. It’s best to get this chore done while the weather is cool, the plants are dormant, and the fish are less active.

Pond cleaning also is the best time to divide and repot water and bog plants that are dormant or semi-dormant. Do not divide those in active growth, such as Louisiana irises and calla lilies.

Continue to plant roses purchased in containers. Bare-root roses should have been planted last month.

Make notes on your spring-flowering bulbs over the next few weeks. Record when they bloom, how well they performed and other relevant information. This will help you plan what to plant this fall.

Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2016/03/ponds_vegetables_roses_and_spr.html

Glen Burnie West: Expert offering small space gardening tips at state show

Glen Burnie resident Kim Roman is sharing gardening tips and small gardening space strategies at the Maryland Home and Garden show this weekend at the Maryland State Fairgrounds.

Roman is the owner of Square Foot Gardening 4U, a home-based business that teaches how to garden organically in small urban spaces. Roman is a certified Square Foot Gardening instructor. She trained in Colorado under Mel Bartholomew, the author of Square Foot Gardening, who developed the concept of gardening in small spaces.

Roman is collaborating with Bartholomew to write Square Foot Gardening books for children. She anticipates the book will be available for sale late fall 2016 or early spring 2017.

Roman said Square Foot Gardening is based on a planting within a grid system laid out in square foot increments. Vegetables are planted much closer together than in traditional gardens. Roman said you get 100 percent of the harvest with only 20 percent of the space, 10 percent of the water, five percent of the seeds and zero percent of the fertilizer used by traditional gardening methods.

She practices the concept in her backyard and said her small garden typically produces 250 pounds of fresh produce each year.

Roman also promotes other urban gardening concepts, including container and vertical gardens which are suitable for anyone whose gardening space is limited to a patio, balcony or other small space.

Roman shares many ideas that are low-cost and often involve recycling discarded items into gardening containers. During a lecture at the Maryland Home and Garden Show last weekend promoting gardening for children, she advocated repurposing cloth hanging shoe racks into a vertical herb garden. Small pots of herbs are planted in the pockets. The cloth allows for drainage and the hanging rack can easily be attached to a fence.

Roman also explained how an arch is suitable for growing squash, small melons, pumpkins and other produce that typically send long vine shoots out over the ground. An arch can be constructed from four fence posts and a 50-inch by 16-foot cattle panel. Roman will be available to answer questions at her booth at the show. She also teaches classes on square foot and urban gardening topic in her home and at local community and garden club meetings.

Glen Burnie West: Scouts awarded religious emblem

Glen Burnie West: Scouts awarded religious emblem

Several members of Cub Scout Pack 712 were recently awarded the Parvuli Dei religious emblem during a Scout Sunday Mass at Holy Trinity Parish.

Webelos I members Matthew Lenzenweger, age 10, Ethan Rizzutti, age 10 and Joe Bianchi, age 10 and Bear members Ian Hollingshed, age 8 and Devin Lucas,…

Several members of Cub Scout Pack 712 were recently awarded the Parvuli Dei religious emblem during a Scout Sunday Mass at Holy Trinity Parish.

Webelos I members Matthew Lenzenweger, age 10, Ethan Rizzutti, age 10 and Joe Bianchi, age 10 and Bear members Ian Hollingshed, age 8 and Devin Lucas,…

(Kathleen Shatt)

For details visit www.sfg4u.com or call Roman at 443-995-1288 or sfgkimroman@yahoo.com.

The show is open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $3 for children ages 6- to 12-years-old. Children younger than 6, as well as active duty military, police and fire employees with identification will be admitted free. Tickets can be purchased for a discount on-line at www.mdhomeandgarden.com/spring.

Fundraiser

The Ferndale Early Education Center and George Cromwell Elementary School PTA host a fundraiser 5 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at Pizza Hut, 6712 Ritchie Highway.

For details, call 410-222-6927 or 410-222-6920.

Blessing of Cars

The Lost in the 50’s Custom Car Club will gather at 11 a.m. Saturday at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 105 First Ave. S.W. for a blessing of the cars to kick-off the 2016 cruise season.

The club will host weekly car cruises on the Marley Station mall parking lot, 7900 Ritchie Highway beginning April 2.

For details, contact Leslie Blazek at 410-987-1865.

Potluck Sunday

Ferndale United Methodist Church (117 Ferndale Road) hosts a potluck luncheon Sunday following the 10:30 a.m. worship service. Those attending should bring a side dish or dessert to share.

For details, call 410-761-2880.

Prayer breakfast

The Glen Burnie United Methodist Men will host a prayer breakfast 9 a.m. Saturday in the church social hall, 5 Second Ave. S.E

All men and boys are welcome. For details, call the church at 410-761-4381.

Business mixer

The Northern Anne Arundel Chamber of Commerce will host a business mixer 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. March 16 at the Hampton Inn, 6617 Ritchie Highway. Admission is $10 for members and $15 for non-members,

For details, call the chamber at 410-766-8282 or visit www.naaccc.com.

Variety show auditions

The Catholic Church of Glen Burnie is holding auditions at noon Sunday in the Monsignor Slade Catholic School auditorium, 120 Dorsey Road for a variety show planned for 7 p.m. April 15 and 16 in the school auditorium.

For details, contact Jessica Michaels at jessmichaels89@gmail.com or Dan Miller at dmiller@faithformationprogram.org

Exercise class

Baltimore Washington Medical Center will offer an eight-week Yoga for Stroke Patients class from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays, beginning March 15 in Suite 128 of the Executive Center, 300 Hospital Dr.

Cost is $48. The program is designed for stroke survivors. For details, call 410-533-8103.

• A weight loss surgery support group will meet from 6 to 8 p.m. March 16 in the Leo and Lysbeth Courtney Conference Center, 301 Hospital Dr. Advance registration is requested.

For details, call 410-328-8940.

Flea market

The North County High School Music Department will sponsor a flea market 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 19 in the school cafeteria, 10 E. First Ave.

Spaces are available $25 with a table and $20 without a table. Proceeds will help pay for band uniforms. The number of students in the band has increased by more than 25 percent and they need to buy more uniforms.

For space reservations or more details, contact musicboostesnchs@gmail.com.

Meetings this week

Eternal Quilters Guild: 10 a.m. Thursday. Lauren Kingsland will lecture on “The Extraordinary T-shirt Quilt” based on her book. She will demonstrate how to transform laundry into a legacy.

Contact: Carol Cluster at 410-247-7395 or Claudia Hakala at hakalac@aol.com

Pascal Senior Center

Seniors at the Pascal Senior Center, 125 Dorsey Road, will go treasure hunting 9 a.m. Wednesday based on Edgar Allen Poe’s short story “The Gold-Bug.”

The short story features cryptology, a popular interest when Poe wrote the story in 1843.

Article source: http://www.capitalgazette.com/neighborhoods/ph-ac-cc-glen-burnie-west-0309-20160307-story.html

Garden Tips: Manage Bermudagrass in home lawns – Tri

There are two main types of grassy weeds in home lawns: annual ones that come up from seed each year and perennial ones that persist from year to year, growing from roots and runners that survive the winter. Controlling grassy perennial weeds is a challenge. There are few, if any, chemicals available that will effectively kill the offending weed without harming desirable grasses.

One of the most hard to control perennial grassy weed is Bermudagrass. Bermudagrass is commonly planted in warmer parts of the country as a lawn and pasture grass. However, in our region, it is considered a nasty aggressive and invasive weed in lawns and gardens. As a warm-season grass, it’s dormant during winter and does not start actively growing until warmer months. It has tough wiry rhizomes (runners beneath the soil) and stolons (runners above the soil). It is sometimes confused with crabgrass because seed heads are similar, but crabgrass is an annual that sprouts from seed each year and does not have tough persistent rhizomes or stolons.

Note that there are improved hybrids of Bermudagrass available for planting in lawns in the warm regions of the country. These hybrids have finer textured leaves, a darker green color and they do not produce seed.

Poor lawn care practices can encourage Bermudagrass. To avoid helping this dastardly weed, do not fertilize during summer’s warmest months. This is the time of year when Bermudagrass is actively growing, and fertilization helps it grow even more. Abstain from frequent shallow watering and don’t mow the grass short. These practices also promote Bermudagrass growth.

However, even the best of lawn care practices will not get rid of an infestation. If you cannot tolerate this weed taking over, consider using herbicides for management. In the past few years, fenoxaprop has been labeled for use by homeowners for suppression of Bermudagrass. Bayer Advanced Bermudagrass Control for Lawns contains fenoxaprop.

It is important to note that suppression is the key word here. Fenoxaprop does not kill Bermudagrass outright, it only slows its growth. As noted on the label, using fenoxaprop involves repeated applications (every four weeks throughout active growth) over one or more years. Late application or missing an application will significantly impair the chemical’s effectiveness. Proper timing of applications should be accompanied with lawn care practices that do not encourage Bermudagrass.

Common Bermudagrass does a good job of producing seed, so even if you kill the existing perennial plants, it leaves behind seed that is viable for two years or more.

Of course, you could kill the Bermuda grass to start over with a clean slate. However, an application of the nonselective herbicide glyphosate (also known as Roundup, Impede, Knockout and other trade names) is not a silver bullet. Bermudagrass is so tough that it will probably take several applications or more, spaced four weeks apart, to kill this weed. (Glyphosate should be applied when the Bermudagrass is green and actively growing.) Plus, once it appears dead and you till the ground, wait about two weeks to see if it it begins to regrow; then treat again if it does.

Warning: Common Bermudagrass does a good job of producing seed, so even if you kill the existing perennial plants, it leaves behind seed that is viable for two years or more. If you are lucky enough to get Bermuda grass under control, it can easily re-invade the lawn from seed. Always watch for new patches.

Marianne C. Ophardt is a horticulturist for Washington State University Benton County Extension.

Article source: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/living/home-garden/marianne-ophardt/article63960437.html