Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Archives for January 11, 2016

New Lewes public art project first meeting set Jan. 14

Arriving in Holland, Mich., in September of last year to participate in the nationwide America in Bloom competition and symposium, the delegation, including Lewes in Bloom founder Warren Golde, his wife Jane Ellan, and Linda and Dennis Davison, noticed sculpture and other art forms in the many gardens and public spaces of the town. They also noted that other cities participating in the nationwide America in Bloom symposium showcased art in their gardens and landscapes.

Lewes in Bloom representatives returned home with the Circle of Champions Award for Small Cities, which earned Lewes the right to call itself The Most Beautiful Small City in the United States. Soon thereafter, Jane Ellan learned that Gavin and Lou Braithwaite, former owners of Puzzles and Lewes Gourmet, had also been discussing the idea of bringing sculptures and other forms of outdoor public art to Lewes.

The three met, and the result is a new initiative for Lewes: Art in Bloom, which falls under the auspices of Lewes in Bloom. Its mission will be to work to “enhance the beautification of Historic Lewes and the community at large by means of outdoor art.”

While Lewes in Bloom is currently best known for its beautification through floral displays and landscaping, Art in Bloom wishes to look at adding outdoor art (such as sculptures, and perhaps murals and mosaics) in Lewes’ parks and other public spaces to enhance the cultural beauty of the city.

“Art should be for everyone – and it should play a greater role as part of the city’s cultural tapestry,” said Lou Braithwaite at a recent Art in Bloom committee meeting. “Everyone should have access to art and be able to interact with it at any time. We want to make art available to the people who live here.”

Golde, herself a painter, added: “Art enhances our lives and broadens the horizons of children and adults – it brings more of the wider world into our lives. Public art is missing in Lewes. By adding it throughout the city, it allows all of us to see the world through an artist’s eyes, which makes it more magical and meaningful.”

The trio is in the early planning phase of developing a process for procuring art for Lewes’ public outdoor spaces. According to Gavin Braithwaite, partner organizations throughout the city will be sought in the effort to do this.

“So far the interest has been astounding,” he said. “Whether we are speaking to a city group or an individual about the Art in Bloom concept, it’s as if the door opens even before we knock on it.”

Anyone interested in learning more about Art in Bloom or volunteering to join the effort to bring public art to the city is invited to a meeting at the Lewes Public Library at 4 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 14. The Art In Bloom committee is co-chaired by Jane Ellan Golde (jegolde@aol.com) and Gavin Braithwaite (sparkyncleo@verizon.net). They would welcome emails from people wishing to become involved, or those simply wanting more information.

 

Article source: http://capegazette.villagesoup.com/p/new-lewes-public-art-project-first-meeting-set-jan-14/1464990

Jacksonville volunteers to observe Martin Luther King Jr. Day in community … – Florida Times

As many as 800 volunteers will spend the upcoming Martin Luther King Jr. holiday in low-income Jacksonville neighborhoods, cleaning parks, landscaping, repainting a mural and distributing financial services information, among other things.

Volunteers at the Jan. 18 Day of Service will gather at Edward Waters College and then fan out into Springfield, East Jacksonville, New Town and Northwest Jacksonville, said Lisa Daniel, spokeswoman for the United Way of Northeast Florida, which is coordinating the annual event.

Participants will be “celebrating a day on instead of a day off,” she said. “The community-service projects and canvassing efforts bring people together to make Jacksonville an even better community.”

Advance registration is encouraged by Friday, but people who show up the day of the event will be put to work.

“The preference is definitely that people RSVP so we can place them at projects and balance the amount of people to meet the needs of each project,” Daniel said.

Here are the projects planned by the United Way, HandsOn Jacksonville and the Local Initiatives Support Coalition Jacksonville:

■ Victory Park Cleanup

The United Way Builders Society, a leadership giving group, will lead volunteers in cleaning the University Club Boulevard park’s playground, equipment, sidewalk area and Born Learning Trail; pick up trash and tree limbs; and trim trees and bushes.

■ RealSense Canvassing

Volunteers will distribute information about the United Way’s RealSense program, which provides free financial education, counseling and tax preparation services.

■ Methodist Children’s Village

Volunteers will resand and spread gravel at the Herlong Road nonprofit, which provides child care and other family-related services for children from birth to age 12.

■ Eastside Cleanup

Volunteers will clean up the area around the Jacksonville Children’s Commission on A. Philip Randolph Boulevard.

■ Hogans Creek Cleanup

Volunteers will replace plants, pick up litter and landscape.

■ Northwest Jacksonville Neighborhood Cleanup

Volunteers will clean up five neighborhoods served by the Northwest Jacksonville Community Development Corp. — 29th Street and Chase Avenue, Golfair Estates, Payne Avenue/Hendersonville, Planet Watch/18th Street, Magnolia Gardens and Royal Terrace.

■ Paint the Town with Operation New Hope

Operation New Hope, a prison re-entry nonprofit, and other volunteers will work with a local artist to repaint the mural on an outside wall of The Sanctuary on 8th Street. The sanctuary is a Springfield nonprofit that provides after-school and home school programs and summer camp for neighborhood children.

 

Beth Reese Cravey: (904) 359-4109

Article source: http://jacksonville.com/news/metro/2016-01-11/story/jacksonville-volunteers-observe-martin-luther-king-jr-day-community

Global Electric Lawn Mower Market CAGR Growth of 5% by 2020 – Analysis …








<!– imageTag: –>
<!– imageTagafter: and imageUrl: http://aidaia.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/04397_600769 –>














TripAdvisor Logo. (PRNewsFoto/TripAdvisor)
Research and Markets Logo.
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest








  • <!– assetXML:
    left
    0
    Research and Markets Logo.
    http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnfull/20130307/600769
    http://aidaia.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/8ed92_600769
    http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnthumb/20130307/600769
    http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769
    http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20130307/600769

    and http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769 –>


    <!– ItemAssetXML:
    left
    0
    Research and Markets Logo.
    http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnfull/20130307/600769
    http://aidaia.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/8ed92_600769
    http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnthumb/20130307/600769
    http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769
    http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20130307/600769

    and http://aidaia.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/8ed92_600769 –>
    Research and Markets Logo.









<!– Paragraph before: DUBLIN, Jan. 11, 2016 /PRNewswire/ —

–>
<!– Paragraph After: DUBLIN, Jan. 11, 2016 /PRNewswire/ —

–>

DUBLIN, Jan. 11, 2016 /PRNewswire/ —

<!– Paragraph before: Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/wz5x7m/global_electric) has announced the addition of the “Global Electric Lawn Mower Market 2016-2020” report to their offering.

–>
<!– Paragraph After: Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/wz5x7m/global_electric) has announced the addition of the “Global Electric Lawn Mower Market 2016-2020” report to their offering.

–>

Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/wz5x7m/global_electric) has announced the addition of the “Global Electric Lawn Mower Market 2016-2020” report to their offering.

<!– Paragraph before: This comprehensive report estimates that the global electric lawn mower market will grow at a CAGR of around 5% during the 2016-2020 forecast period.

–>
<!– Paragraph After: This comprehensive report estimates that the global electric lawn mower market will grow at a CAGR of around 5% during the 2016-2020 forecast period.

–>

This comprehensive report estimates that the global electric lawn mower market will grow at a CAGR of around 5% during the 2016-2020 forecast period.

<!– Paragraph before: According to the report, the popularity of landscaping has increased because of the increase in the need to provide aesthetic appeal to residential and commercial properties around the world. As a result, the landscaping of lawns and gardens has gained considerable momentum. The rise in disposable income has also propelled the interest among users in spending on landscaping services.

–>
<!– Paragraph After: According to the report, the popularity of landscaping has increased because of the increase in the need to provide aesthetic appeal to residential and commercial properties around the world. As a result, the landscaping of lawns and gardens has gained considerable momentum. The rise in disposable income has also propelled the interest among users in spending on landscaping services.

–>

According to the report, the popularity of landscaping has increased because of the increase in the need to provide aesthetic appeal to residential and commercial properties around the world. As a result, the landscaping of lawns and gardens has gained considerable momentum. The rise in disposable income has also propelled the interest among users in spending on landscaping services.

<!– Paragraph before: Further, the report states that the prices of the major raw materials used to manufacture power lawn mowers have fluctuated over the past few years. This volatility in the raw material prices is a major challenge for the market.

–>
<!– Paragraph After: Further, the report states that the prices of the major raw materials used to manufacture power lawn mowers have fluctuated over the past few years. This volatility in the raw material prices is a major challenge for the market.

–>

Further, the report states that the prices of the major raw materials used to manufacture power lawn mowers have fluctuated over the past few years. This volatility in the raw material prices is a major challenge for the market.

<!– Paragraph before: The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors.

–>
<!– Paragraph After: The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors.

–>

The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors.

<!– Paragraph before: Questions Answered:

–>
<!– Paragraph After: Questions Answered:

–>

Questions Answered:

  • What are the key factors driving the global electric lawn mower market?
  • What are the Key Market trends?impacting the growth of global electric lawn mower market?
  • What are the various opportunities and threats faced by the vendors in the global electric lawn mower market?
  • Growth forecast for the key segments of the global electric lawn mower market?
  • Trending factors influencing the market shares for APAC (Asia and Oceania), Europe, North America, and ROW (Latin America and MEA)?

<!– Paragraph before: Companies Mentioned:

–><!– Paragraph After: Companies Mentioned:

–>

Companies Mentioned:

  • Deere and Company
  • Husqvarna
  • MTD Products
  • The Toro Company
  • Briggs Stratton
  • Emak
  • GreenWorks Tools
  • Hitachi
  • Honda
  • Makita
  • Stanley Black and Decker
  • STIHL
  • Textron
  • Zomax

<!– Paragraph before: Report Structure:

–><!– Paragraph After: Report Structure:

–>

Report Structure:

<!– Paragraph before: PART 01: Executive summary

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 01: Executive summary

–>

PART 01: Executive summary

<!– Paragraph before: PART 02: Scope of the report

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 02: Scope of the report

–>

PART 02: Scope of the report

<!– Paragraph before: PART 03: Market research methodology

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 03: Market research methodology

–>

PART 03: Market research methodology

<!– Paragraph before: PART 04: Introduction

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 04: Introduction

–>

PART 04: Introduction

<!– Paragraph before: PART 05: Market landscape

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 05: Market landscape

–>

PART 05: Market landscape

<!– Paragraph before: PART 06: Market segmentation by product

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 06: Market segmentation by product

–>

PART 06: Market segmentation by product

<!– Paragraph before: PART 07: Geographical segmentation

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 07: Geographical segmentation

–>

PART 07: Geographical segmentation

<!– Paragraph before: PART 08: Market drivers

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 08: Market drivers

–>

PART 08: Market drivers

<!– Paragraph before: PART 09: Impact of drivers

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 09: Impact of drivers

–>

PART 09: Impact of drivers

<!– Paragraph before: PART 10: Market challenges

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 10: Market challenges

–>

PART 10: Market challenges

<!– Paragraph before: PART 11: Impact of drivers and challenges

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 11: Impact of drivers and challenges

–>

PART 11: Impact of drivers and challenges

<!– Paragraph before: PART 12: Market trends

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 12: Market trends

–>

PART 12: Market trends

<!– Paragraph before: PART 13: Vendor landscape

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 13: Vendor landscape

–>

PART 13: Vendor landscape

<!– Paragraph before: PART 14: Other prominent vendors

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 14: Other prominent vendors

–>

PART 14: Other prominent vendors

<!– Paragraph before: PART 15: Appendix

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 15: Appendix

–>

PART 15: Appendix

<!– Paragraph before: PART 16: About the Author

–>
<!– Paragraph After: PART 16: About the Author

–>

PART 16: About the Author

<!– Paragraph before: For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/wz5x7m/global_electric

–>
<!– Paragraph After: For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/wz5x7m/global_electric

–>

For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/wz5x7m/global_electric

<!– Paragraph before: Media Contact:

–>
<!– Paragraph After: Media Contact:

–>

Media Contact:

<!– Paragraph before: Laura Wood, +353-1-481-1716, press@researchandmarkets.net

–>
<!– Paragraph After: Laura Wood, +353-1-481-1716, press@researchandmarkets.net

–>

Laura Wood, +353-1-481-1716, press@researchandmarkets.net

<!– Paragraph before:

–>
<!– Paragraph After:

–>

 

<!– Paragraph before: To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-electric-lawn-mower-market-cagr-growth-of-5-by-2020—analysis–forecasts-report—companies-mentioned-include-hitachi-honda–stanley-black-and-decker-300202080.html

–>
<!– Paragraph After: To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-electric-lawn-mower-market-cagr-growth-of-5-by-2020—analysis–forecasts-report—companies-mentioned-include-hitachi-honda–stanley-black-and-decker-300202080.html

–>

SOURCE Research and Markets

RELATED LINKS
http://www.researchandmarkets.com

Article source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-electric-lawn-mower-market-cagr-growth-of-5-by-2020---analysis--forecasts-report---companies-mentioned-include-hitachi-honda--stanley-black-and-decker-300202080.html

GARDENING: Nine tips to help a waterlogged garden recover


Has your garden suffered waterlogging in the recent wet weather?

Here’s nine tips to help it recover:

1. Vegetable gardeners shouldn’t sow until the soil is dry enough – start off crops in modules.

2. Waterlogging and compaction can create ideal conditions for phytopthora (root rot) and other fungal attacks.

3. Remove any dead, diseased or dying shoots as soon as you see them so disease doesn’t spread.

4. When the soil has started to dry out, dig it over to help create an open structure. Work from boards to avoid compaction.

5. Fruit trees and bushes may suffer from root rots and be liable to wilting in hot, dry spells. Mulch, water and feed during the growing season to encourage new root growth.

6. In clay soil, use plenty of organic matter and horticultural grit before planting to improve soil structure and drainage. Nutrients will have been washed away in free­-draining soil, add compost to bulk up the soil and add nutrients.

7. Build a drainage system or soakaway. Dig ditches filled with gravel to drain water away, or talk to a builder about a pipe drainage system.

8. Replace losses with water­tolerant trees and shrubs, such as Cornus alba, C. stolonifera, Hydrangea macrophylla, H. paniculata, Kerria japonica, Leycesteria formosa, Weigela, Salix, Betula, Sambucus, Liquidambar, ash and amelanchier.

9. If things are really soggy, make a bog garden, which is an excellent habitat for wildlife. Suitable plants include Iris ensata, I. laevigata, I. pseudacorus, I. sibirica, primulas, Actaea, Astilbe and Carex, plus the magnificent leaves of Gunnera, hostas, Rheum and Rodgersia.

* For more gardening news, tips and offers, visit www.mandycanudigit.co.uk

Article source: http://www.shieldsgazette.com/lifestyle-etc/home-and-garden/gardening-nine-tips-to-help-a-waterlogged-garden-recover-1-7664235

Tips on winter gardening and rose diseases to highlight meeting; and other …

Red River Rose Society

Winter gardening tips, rose disease and other topics will be discussed at the upcoming meeting of the Red River Rose Society. The meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 19 at the Denison Public Library. However, any members or guests who wish to meet at The Rig in Denison for a Dutch treat dinner at 5 p.m. prior to the meeting are welcomed to do so.

President Sue Abernathy will update the group on 2016 meeting plans and will give information about things to be done in the garden this month. She and other Certified Rosarians will also be available to answer questions about growing roses.

Featured speaker for the evening will be Karen Page, a Master Gardener. She will be speaking on Rose Rosette Disease which is killing roses across the nation. She will give tips on how to identify the disease and what can be done to stop it from spreading.

National Active and Retired Federal Employees

Gardening in Texomaland was discussed at the January meeting of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees (NARFE). The gathering was held Jan. 7 at The Renaissance in Sherman and led by President Ralph Mattingly.

Bringing the program was Linda Taube, owner of Twin Oaks Nursery. She noted that the nursery has several free seminars scheduled including one on pruning roses and lawn care for Feb. 6. Future free seminars will include how to create an inside fairy garden, the monarch butterfly program at Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge and a presentation for a visiting arborist. She included information on the services provided at the nursery.

Taube gave information on winter and late winter gardening. In January, purchase and plant fruit trees and onion slips and start inside seeds. In February, cut back rose bushes about a third to a half, but climbing roses shouldn’t be cut back until April. Taube also recommended treatments and products to handle insect prevention and plant disease, as well as gave details on a seven step lawn program. Each attendee was also given a panda plant.

During a business session, Diane Geer, secretary, read minutes from the last meeting and Jane Cranford provided the treasurer’s report.

Carol Hottel read names of January birthday honorees – Jane Cranford, James Groce, BeBe Flynn and Charles Huddleston.

Service officer Bruce Hottel read names of chapter members who died during 2015 – Pauline McCauley, Winnie Mayes, Frankie Walker, Neil Chauncey and Mildren Harvey. A moment of silence was observed in their honor.

For information on NARFE, call 903-465-0099.

National Association of Retired and Veteran Railway Employees

Fran Tucker presided at last week’s meeting of the National Association of Retired and Veteran Railway Employees (NARVRE). Harry Gates opened the session with a prayer and Lyle “Cookie” Nelson led the Pledge of Allegiance.

Bettye Henry and Tucker gave month reports and Gates and Nelson brought legislative news.

Members observing January birthdays are Ann Auvigne, Larry Grossman, Linda Black, Talmadge Marshall, Loren Mathison and Eugene Wood. Celebrating anniversaries are Derl and Fran Tucker, Larry and Jessie Grossman, Bobby and Rosemary Householder and Dudley and Betsy Markham.

The next meeting will be Feb. 12 at the Denison Public Library. The sessions are open to all railroaders and their spouses.

Denison Performing Arts

The Denison Performing Arts board met Jan. 5 at the Denison Area Chamber of Commerce. President Carolyn Brady led the session.

Tammie Overturf presented the treasurer’s report which was discussed and approved.

Upcoming programs were discussed including the Denison High School production of Beauty and the Beast Jan. 21 and 22 and the annual Young At Art beginning Feb. 1. The artwork will be displayed at each elementary school and the award ceremony will be held Feb. 9 at the Denison Public Library. This year’s piano competition at Grayson College will be April 16 and registration will be available online at www.denisonperformingarts.org.

A special presentation was given by guest speaker Jessica Walker on a tile tribute project for the Denison Fire and Police Departments.

Performing a special string program were Suellen Davis and Zoe White.

The next Denison Performing Arts board meeting will be on Feb. 1.

Denison Rotary Club

Keith McBrayer was welcomed as a guest speaker at last week’s Denison Rotary Club meeting. He was introduced by Rotarian Freddy Lessly.

McBrayer, a retired Denison school teacher, serves as the educational director at the Harber Wildlife Museum, located on Texoma Parkway in Sherman. He reported that schools from throughout the area bring in students for tours. All backdrops used inside the museum were painted by two Grayson College students. He went on to show slides of animal displays located inside the museum and explained about the animals.

This week’s program will be presented by Janet Karam from the Texoma Area Agency on Aging.

For information on the club, go to www.denisonrotary.com.

Article source: http://heralddemocrat.com/living/lifestyle/tips-winter-gardening-and-rose-diseases-highlight-meeting-and-other-news-clubs-and

Iconic Lancaster home, business up for sale

LANCASTER- An iconic Lancaster home, which has operated as bed and breakfast and catering outfit for the last 15 years, is up for sale.

Wayne and Kay Williams, owners of Henry Manor Bed Breakfast, are selling their home after serving countless meals to the community and welcoming guests to stay in their three-story historic brick home, 1755 Cedar Hill Road.

Married for 52 years, the Williams are looking to retire from their business to have more time to spend with their three children and grandchildren.

“It’s just getting harder and harder to do it,” Wayne said. “We’d would like to retire.”

The couple hopes the new owners will pick up where they left off and recognize Henry Manor’s “endless potential” and the 9.2 acres it includes.

“I would like to sell it to someone who is interested in doing what we’re doing,” Kay said, but they are willing to sell to anyone, even if they’re only interested in using the property as a single-family home.

The home was originally built in 1869 by Wesley Peters, complete with a 10-by-10 foot tower where a water tank was housed, but now acts as a fourth-floor room. Henry Manor was built using money earned from selling mules to the Union Army during the Civil War, Wayne said about the home’s history.

The home fell into disrepair over the years until Dick White spent six years restoring it to its original glory. Looking to move to the area from Florida in 2000, Wayne and Kay purchased the home to fulfill their dream of owning a bed and breakfast while still utilizing Kay’s extensive catering skills.

“We quit our jobs and came up here,” Kay said.

Since the couple opened the bed and breakfast in 2001, they’ve hosted between two to four weddings each summer and have served hundreds for their Sunday brunches and holiday dinners, including Mother’s Day and Valentine’s Day.

“We just had 70 people for New Year’s Eve,” she said.

Between the in-house events and offsite catering, the Williams decided it was time to retire, but only after the house is sold. They said they will keep working and booking events (except weddings) until it’s purchased.

After decades of cooking and baking for people, Kay said it’s still her passion and one she first started at the tender age of 6 when she used a stool to reach a pot on the stove.

Locally, she is known for her angel custard cake, raspberry key lime pie and hummingbird cake. In addition to the home’s two kitchens and two extra bedrooms she keeps made up for guests, Kay also took great care of the garden.

Kay said she spent many warm days outside tending to the manor’s grounds, including transplanting honeysuckle from the woods behind the home to line the front of the property. The extensive landscaping has also become too much for the couple, and last summer, they hired a lawn care company to care for the yard.

The home sits on three acres, but there is an additional six acres or so that are undeveloped. Wayne and Kay still have ideas about how they could’ve used the space had they had time to dedicate to it. They still look off of the home’s large porch and think of the weddings that could take place there and the old chicken coop they had always planned to restore.

But, they’ve decided to leave all of that up to a new family with their own set of ideas for their old home.

“There’s just a lot of potential,” Kay said. “It’s a beautiful old home and it’s part of the history of Lancaster.”

Gorsuch Realty will be hosting an open house of Henry Manor on Jan. 24.

sremoquill@lancastereaglegazette.com

740-681-4342

Twitter: @SpencerRemo

Article source: http://www.lancastereaglegazette.com/story/news/local/2016/01/10/iconic-lancaster-home-business-up-sale/78365122/

The Best Landscape Designer

You are the best landscape designer – for your own yard, that is. Nobody knows your likes and dislikes better than you do, and nobody knows more about your outdoor habits. That makes you the best suited for the task of designing a landscape you will love.

Who doesn’t want a well-balanced and thriving landscape surrounding their home? You could hire a professional to walk you through the process, but you may enjoy the outcome even more if you do the work yourself and you are sure to save a lot of money.

According to home.costhelper.com, homeowners spend and average of $11 a square foot and closer to $20 if you throw in a water feature, a more formal design, or a wall or two, but since this is the information age, you already have all the help you need.

As long as you don’t mind taking the initiative and taking a little time to pull together design inspiration and information, you can have a beautiful design for free. And you can install it in stages as time and budget allow.

The key is a plan! To get the most out of your outdoor space you will need to organize your ideas into a plan. For help generating sketches you can find a free online service called Plan A Garden at the Better Homes and Gardens website, BHG.com. You can also shop for software that ranges from $20 – $400, if you want a little extra help getting everything organized and onto paper.

With or without a landscape design program, doing a little homework will get you ready to put together the perfect landscape design for you and your outdoor space. Go to extension.missouri.edu and select the Lawn and Garden tab to read about steps to successful landscaping. The steps include: making a list of existing and desired outdoor features, drawing a base plan over which you can outline the major landscape areas (i.e. public areas, private areas, and service areas), designating locations for the desired features, and lastly, putting it all together in the final landscape plan. You can read about another take on the process at Williamson.agrilife.org, under the “Landscape” section. This article goes into even greater detail about these steps, breaking them into 12 separate steps.

Take some time to consider the unique conditions you have to work with – soil types, sun and wind exposure, slopes and drainage, orientation of property and structures, and view points from windows and walkways. This will help you to select plants and hardscapes that are right for each area of your yard.

To read more about the visual aspects of landscape design, check out Basic Principles of Landscape Design from the University of Florida website at edis.ifas.ufl.edu. And Remember: a couple days before breaking ground, call 811 to have all utility lines marked.

After doing a little reading and drawing out a plan for yourself, you can have a custom landscape design, tailored to your preferences and needs. The work will be well worth it when you are able to enjoy your outdoor space, designed perfectly for you, by YOU!

Article source: http://www.valleymorningstar.com/life/master_gardeners/article_c8a3c9d0-b651-11e5-b5b1-7f13a1688530.html

Massive document outlines Southern Nevada’s future transportation needs – Las Vegas Review

You’ve heard about all those big-ticket items that are a part of the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada’s Transportation Investment Business Plan.

The light-rail system that would connect McCarran International Airport to the Strip and to downtown Las Vegas.

The possibility that said light-rail system could go underground at least part of the way along Las Vegas Boulevard.

The new stops and extension of the Las Vegas Monorail to connect the city’s major convention centers.

The construction of a multimodal transportation center near McCarran.

The transformation of Maryland Parkway into a “complete street” with wider sidewalks, dedicated bicycle lanes, a mass-transit line — possibly another light rail — and landscaping in support of mixed-use street frontage.

But there are other, less expensive solutions embedded in TIBP, the acronym boosters of the plan call it.

Action this month

Policymakers from the Transportation Commission, Clark County, the city of Las Vegas and the state, via the Southern Nevada Tourism Infrastructure Committee, will debate aspects of the plan this month, hoping to find common ground on what ideas make the most sense, which projects are the most pressing and what plans can be effected efficiently with minimal disruption and spending.

Detailed presentations are scheduled before multiple boards and legislative bodies, including the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority this week.

“As with any plan that embodies an ongoing course of work and envisions a journey, this plan is intended to be a ‘living’ document,” Regional Transportation Commission General Manager Tina Quigley says in the plan’s introduction.

“The plan serves as a foundational framework that contemplates and embraces continued exploration and development,” she wrote. “I am incredibly proud of our community’s vision for transformational mobility planning. It promises to contribute a new chapter to Las Vegas’ inspiring history … elevating our community as a better place to live, work, play and do business and ensuring our city’s greatness for generations to come.”

The plan’s origins came from a series of meetings by a group assembled by Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority President and CEO Rossi Ralenkotter, who brought together transportation and tourism industry stakeholders to consider the consequences of failing to keep up with strides taken by global competitors.

“Rossi told everybody to check their own interests at the door and to keep the whole community’s needs in mind during our discussions,” Quigley said.

After the committee provided direction, the Transportation Commission staff and consultants took it from there. The result was a 2,365-page document filled with charts, maps and documentation spelling out how Southern Nevada’s transportation needs could best be met.

In some cases, the plan offers multiple alternatives and why some options are better than others. The report explains that one project won’t fix the entire problem. It also offers return-on-investment analyses to prioritize projects.

And, it also addresses the ramifications of doing nothing.

“Taken alone, any one project will not accomplish the overall goal,” the plan said. “Only when strategically implemented with interconnected, complementary projects will we achieve success.”

Possible courses

The list of projects is divided into seven “suites” of action:

— Enhancing visitor mobility between McCarran, the resort corridor and downtown. That’s the piece that has gotten the most headlines. With building a light-rail system, expanding the Bonneville Transit Center and building a McCarran station to accommodate rail, the plan proposes improving pickup and drop-off points for shuttle buses, taxis, limousines and ride-hailing companies. It also proposes the “Koval-Swenson elevated couplets,” a pair of one-way elevated express lanes to McCarran along Koval Lane and Tropicana Avenue and from McCarran on Swenson Street. (The Tropicana portion would be submerged below ground level because it’s near the end of two McCarran runways.)

— Improving pedestrian safety and mobility along Las Vegas Boulevard. The plan considers seven new pedestrian bridges over the Strip, including a circular structure at Las Vegas Boulevard and Sahara Avenue — the gateway between downtown Las Vegas and the Strip — and an arced X-shaped bridge with arms to The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, Bellagio, Paris Las Vegas and Planet Hollywood. New bridges also would cross the boulevard at Riviera Boulevard, Resorts World Drive, in front of The Linq, in front of the Flamingo, and at the Hard Rock Cafe and MGM Grand. There’s also a plan to widen sidewalks to 18 feet where possible and to elevate the sidewalks in heavy traffic areas, particularly where pedestrian traffic conflicts with vehicles turning into resorts. Elevated sidewalks are eyed on the west side of Las Vegas Boulevard at Treasure Island, Caesars Palace, between Caesars Palace and Bellagio, and between Bellagio and CityCenter. On the east side, they would be between the Flamingo and the Venetian and between the Plaza (McDonald’s) and Harmon Avenue. The pedestrian safety suite also includes plans to design a wayfinding system that would direct visitors to “districts” within the resort corridor.

— Improving connections between convention and event facilities. The proposed monorail extension, from the MGM Grand to Mandalay Bay, and adding a monorail stop near the Sands Expo and Convention Center, are part of the plan. So are street connectivity and pedestrian enhancements that would include the widening of Koval Lane to include Giles Street and Reno Avenue along the periphery of McCarran; an extension of Howard Hughes Parkway between Flamingo Road and Tropicana Avenue; and the extension of the Swenson-Paradise one-way couplet north to Sahara Avenue, eventually connecting them farther north to the Main Street-Commerce Avenue one-way couplets that are under construction. A “complete streets” makeover also is envisioned for Harmon Avenue and for both pedestrian and transit circulation on Convention Center Drive and Riviera Boulevard.

— Improving connectivity between the core area and workforce population centers. That means high-capacity transit — that could be light rail, bus rapid transit or regional express routes — on Maryland Parkway north and south, Flamingo Road and Charleston Boulevard east and west, North Fifth Street to the north, Valley View Boulevard and U.S. Highway 95, Las Vegas Boulevard South to Blue Diamond Road and the entire Las Vegas Beltway. The plan also considers new park-and-ride facilities at Downtown Summerlin, the Beltway and Flamingo Road, the Beltway and South Decatur Boulevard (Beltway Business Park), North Fifth Street and Centennial Parkway and at Meadows mall.

— Improving core area access from Interstate 15. Three key street connection projects are considered: Valley View Boulevard to Harmon Avenue over the Union Pacific railroad tracks; Meade Avenue to Resorts World Drive; and Martin Luther King Boulevard to Meade Avenue. The plan also endorses the previously announced reconfiguration of the I-15 Tropicana Avenue ramp. It suggests special high-occupancy-vehicle ramps at Meade, Harmon and Hacienda avenues and a direct HOV connection ramp from Interstate 215 to the airport through the unused center bore of the Airport Connector tunnel.

— Improving downtown circulation and access. The plan recommends a downtown trolley circulator, a rail system smaller than conventional light rail. Several street improvements already are in planning by the city of Las Vegas and as part of Project Neon. Road improvements include the “Neon Gateway” HOV drop ramp, a connection between Grand Central Parkway and Industrial Road and an extension of Martin Luther King Boulevard to Oakey Boulevard. The plan also suggests new exits off U.S. Highway 95 near downtown, at Maryland Parkway and at City Parkway.

— Supporting transportation infrastructure coordination and implementation. The plan suggests formation of a Resort Corridor Mobility Association, an organization dedicated to suggesting transportation improvements to the proper government entity for consideration. One of its first priorities could be to develop a transportation navigation program to assist tourists — and locals — with transportation and way-finding options, parking and mobility matters. The plan also suggests breaking up “superblocks,” long stretches of blocks along Las Vegas Boulevard, with easements, pedestrian corridors and new roads to reduce congestion.

While the plan is ambitious — and expensive — the plan addresses what happens if nothing is done, which is an option.

“The cost of doing nothing is steep,” the plan said. “It means more rush hour traffic at all hours, more time wasted in stop-and-go traffic and more crowded sidewalks in the resort corridor that trigger bad experiences.”

The plan estimates allowing the already strained transportation infrastructure to be pushed beyond its breaking point would result in economic losses as visitors find trips more pleasant in other places where it’s easier to get around.

The economic damage: $266 million to $2.7 billion on average per year over 30 years.

“These are staggering economic losses,” the report said. “Southern Nevada has grown into what it is today thanks to a history of investment in its highways, airport and other key transportation infrastructure that sustain its primary industry. To fully realize its economic potential over the next half century, Southern Nevada must retrace that history and invest in the critical infrastructure so vital to its success.”

The Review-Journal is owned by a limited liability company controlled by the Adelson family, majority owners of Las Vegas Sands.

Contact reporter Richard N. Velotta at rvelotta@reviewjournal.com or 702-477-3893. Find him on Twitter: @RickVelotta

Article source: http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/traffic-transportation/massive-document-outlines-southern-nevadas-future-transportation-needs