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Archives for November 13, 2015

Skaters flying high with opening of Berry Hill, Lexington’s newest, most …

The skateboarder looks out over a sea of smooth concrete. With a bend of his knees, balanced on an 8-inch-wide board and four small wheels, the skateboarder is sent flying toward the center of a bowl, momentum carrying him quickly up the other side. He shifts his weight, pivots the board, and is off again.

That’s the scene at Berry Hill Park, where dozens of skateboarders, BMX riders and inline skaters flock each day to perfect tricks at the city’s newest and most challenging skatepark. Located at 3489 Buckhorn Drive, the skatepark features a flow bowl, snake run, street section, stairs and rails.

Skater Justin Hunt shows off his skills during the grand opening of Lexington's Berry Hill skatepark. (Photo by Amy Wallot/Lexington Government Communications)

Skater Justin Hunt shows off his skills during the grand opening of Lexington’s Berry Hill skatepark. (Photo by Amy Wallot/Lexington Government Communications)

“There is a new energy and vibrancy at Berry Hill because of this skatepark,” Mayor Jim Gray said today at the park’s grand opening celebration. “Thank you to Friends for Skateparks, which supported the project and provided great input and ideas to Parks and Recreation.”

Major construction of the skatepark was completed this summer. Since then, Lexington Parks and Recreation has installed a new sidewalk, landscaping and a water fountain.

“The Berry Hill skatepark is now a reality and is being used daily. It appears to be a welcomed addition to the park and provides another activity for our youth,” said 8th District Councilmember Fred Brown.

Designed with intermediate and advanced riders in mind, Berry Hill is Lexington’s third and largest skatepark. “We now have something for skaters of all ability levels,” said Monica Conrad, director of Lexington Parks and Recreation. “Since the opening of the Woodland Park skatepark in 1999, we’ve seen interest in this activity continue to grow. Parks and Recreation offers a small skate pad for beginners at Kirklevington Park, and we are in the process of designing another skate pad for Valley Park.”

Jonathan Wilson at the new Berry Hill skatepark (Photo by Amy Wallot/Lexington Government Communications)

Jonathan Wilson at the new Berry Hill skatepark (Photo by Amy Wallot/Lexington Government Communications)

The park was designed and built by Dreamland Skateparks, an Oregon-based company with more than 20 years’ experience in skatepark construction. One of Dreamland’s craftsmen, Burke Morris, is a Lexington native who incorporated Bluegrass-themed elements into the design. Some of the concrete in the skatepark was stamped with horseshoes and stylized to mimic limestone, and one of the metal rails features the outline of galloping Thoroughbreds.

“Dreamland is proud to have designed and built the Berry Hill skatepark for the people of Lexington, and for skaters from all over Kentucky,” Morris said. “It is a unique, world-class facility, with numerous artistic features tailored specifically for the region. We can’t wait to see the talent that will develop from this park.”

The Berry Hill skatepark was an initiative of former 8th District Councilmember George Myers. The city partnered with Friends for Skateparks to design and raise money for the project. Donors and volunteers included Cosmic Skateshop, Case Construction Equipment, Wilson Equipment and dozens of citizens across the community.

Parks and Recreation will continue collaborating with the Friends group on designs for future projects.

From City of Lexington

Article source: http://www.kyforward.com/skaters-flying-high-with-opening-of-berry-hill-lexingtons-newest-most-challenging-skatepark/

New skatepark opens in Lexington

Berry Hill Skatepark in Lexington has Grand Opening 11-12-15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – Lexington opened its third and largest skatepark on Thursday. Berry Hill skatepark on Buckhorn Drive features a flow bowl, snake run, street section, stairs and rails. Major construction of the skatepark was completed over the summer. Since then, Parks Recreation has installed a new sidewalk, landscaping and a water fountain.

“There is a new energy and vibrancy at Berry Hill because of this skatepark,” Mayor Jim Gray said at the park’s grand opening celebration. “Thank you to Friends for Skateparks, which supported the project and provided great input and ideas to Parks Recreation.”

“The Berry Hill skatepark is now a reality and is being used daily. It appears to be a welcomed addition to the park and provides another activity for our youth,” said 8th District Councilmember Fred Brown.

“We now have something for skaters of all ability levels,” said Monica Conrad, Director of Lexington Parks Recreation. “Since the opening of the Woodland Park skatepark in 1999, we’ve seen interest in this activity continue to grow. Parks Recreation offers a small skate pad for beginners at Kirklevington Park, and we are in the process of designing another skate pad for Valley Park.”

The park was designed and built by Dreamland Skateparks, an Oregon-based company with more than 20 years’ experience in skatepark construction. One of Dreamland’s craftsmen, Burke Morris, is a Lexington native who incorporated Bluegrass-themed elements into the design. Some of the concrete in the skatepark was stamped with horseshoes and stylized to mimic limestone, and one of the metal rails features the outline of galloping Thoroughbreds.

“Dreamland is proud to have designed and built the Berry Hill skatepark for the people of Lexington, and for skaters from all over Kentucky,” Morris said. “It is a unique, world-class facility, with numerous artistic features tailored specifically for the region. We can’t wait to see the talent that will develop from this park.”

The Berry Hill skatepark was an initiative of former 8th District Councilmember George Myers. The City partnered with Friends for Skateparks to design and raise money for the project. Donors and volunteers included Cosmic Skateshop, Case Construction Equipment, Wilson Equipment and dozens of citizens across the community.

Parks Recreation will continue collaborating with the Friends group on designs for future projects.

Article source: http://www.wtvq.com/2015/11/13/new-skatepark-opens-in-lexington/

Dinkel Series on Crookston’s historic homes – Part I: 234 Houston Avenue, home …



Posted Nov. 13, 2015 at 10:34 AM


Crookston, Minn.

Article source: http://www.crookstontimes.com/article/20151113/NEWS/151119757

Winter’s landscape can be perfect backdrop for home sales

The garden beds looked inviting, with gray lamb’s ears settings off yellow black-eyed Susans and red roses. That was more than a month ago.

“They were really nice. You should have seen them,” said John Korslund, noting that in warm weather, the shrubs and trees were backdrops for colorful gardens of flowers, herbs and vegetables.

But shorter days and freezing nights have turned the landscape scraggly, and that will send the wrong message to potential buyers of the Fulton home that Korslund and his wife, Pat, hope to have on the market by year’s end.

“The biggest thing we need to do now is trim back the bushes and the things that have already bloomed,” he said. “Our goal is to make it look like it’s well-tended and it will come back next spring.”

Terri Westerlund of Le Reve Real Estate in Howard County put him touch with staging consultant Judy Callow, who advised him to start pruning and buy black mulch before she even scheduled her visit.

Repairing your home from this winter and preparing it for next winter

Repairing your home from this winter and preparing it for next winter

This was not the surprise Foster Lewis wanted in the basement family room on a cold and rainy winter night.

“When you stepped in the middle of the room … your socks were wet,” he said. More than 50 gallons of water had invaded the beige carpeting — and while a little water had occasionally seeped…

This was not the surprise Foster Lewis wanted in the basement family room on a cold and rainy winter night.

“When you stepped in the middle of the room … your socks were wet,” he said. More than 50 gallons of water had invaded the beige carpeting — and while a little water had occasionally seeped…

(Andrea F. Siegel)

Home sellers must tap into a winter strategy to create curb appeal in the season’s stark look. Very doable, experts said, noting that winter may be at least as, if not more, beneficial for sellers as well house-hunters.

“You have a tremendous drop-off in inventory, so you have a tremendous opportunity. The people you have out there looking are very motivated buyers. They are not going to be schlepping out there in the snow and rain and ice if they don’t have to,” said Long Foster’s Anthony Corrao of the Corrao sales team, based in Columbia and Lutherville.

“The strong spring and summer market leads to buyers that are still in the game,” said Cindy Ariosa, vice chairman of the board of Metropolitan Regional Information Systems and senior vice president of Long Foster.

Beyond relocations, snow days help. “People home with the kids when school is closed … the house becomes very small very fast,” she said. That sends parents to scour listings online. “We actually get a spike in Internet inquiries.”

Figures show that regionally, with the exception of the spring rush when houses tend to sell very quickly, winter listings may be on the market only slightly longer than in other seasons.

Another upside for sellers: All area homes are lawn- and flower-challenged. “Some houses aren’t as well-kept as their neighbors, so they don’t show as well in the spring and fall. But that won’t show up as much in the winter,” said Margaret Woda, a Long Foster agent in the Crofton area.

A home for sale in cold weather should have an unfussy, nicely maintained landscape with sharp edging around curved beds and walkways to telegraph to buyers that the house is great inside, too. Landscaping for winter sale should be underway now, before it’s too chilly to do yardwork or paint the front door.

“You’re not going to edge around your sidewalks when it’s freezing. But you can do it now,” Woda said.

The Korslunds took October’s warm days to begin sprucing up, pulling spent vegetable plants, weeding, cutting back perennials and trimming just about everything else.

They plan to clear the garage roof of pine needles so they won’t clog gutters, prune evergreen trees to draw attention to greenery that enhances the property year-round and repaint a shed, all aimed to send the message of good landscape maintenance.

Here’s what agents and stagers advise for winter sellers:

Maintenance: “Make sure your yard is cleaned up. It should be freshly mulched,” said Westerlund. Keep after fallen branches and leaves. “If you have too many leaves down, people think [the home] needs maintenance.”

Buyers must reach the home safely; keep walks and steps clear of snow and ice. Shovel out the driveway or parking space, then put the shovel and rock salt out of sight. Sellers can’t shovel? Hire a service, said Brandon Hoffman, a Redfin listing agent for Baltimore and Howard County.

Repair fences. Clean gutters and ensure that ice dams won’t develop and send water inside.

The view: Create a simple one. Let the house shine. “I like to go out to the street and look and see that I can see the house. … If you need to, trim deciduous trees” to give them an “airy appearance” and open up the view of the home, Westerlund said. Remove dead wood. Stash hoses, toys, tools, trash cans and lawn ornaments, said Callow.

Shrubs and beds: Remove dead plants, and shape and trim everything else. “I like black mulch. It makes everything pop right out,” said Callow. She suggests planting yellow pansies ¿ in pots on flanking the front door and in front of shaped shrubs ¿ because they draw attention. They might need to be covered overnight when temperatures dip, she said. (Caution: Deer may eat pansies.)

Create a semiformal look with shrubs. Laurels can be planted through early fall, boxwoods well into November. Both can be shaped and “look good through the winter,” said Jason Sersen, general manager of Kingsdene Nursery and Garden Center in Monkton, and work as foundation plantings and hedges.

“Hollies plant well into November,” Sersen said, noting that hollies are a diverse group of shrubs and trees. Some shed their leaves for winter, but some don’t; some have bright red berries.

For trees, blue spruces, Norway spruces and white pines ¿ all commonly seen locally ¿ can “make a yard look good,” and generally, evergreens can be planted into December, he said.

Structure and lighting: Large planters and decorative urns hint at the summer potential of snow-covered space, even without plants. Some agents prefer greenery, such as dwarf boxwoods, to flowers in planters flanking the front entrance, and others maintain that a planter with only mulch on top is OK. Use ground-level exterior lights to highlight foundation shrubbery, the front of the house, and walkways or driveways.

Holiday decorations: Go for gracious and low-key; place a wreath on the front door. Icicle-style lights along gutters are a “turn-off,” said Corrao. Greenery and accent lighting are nice, he said. He recommended candle-like lights in windows for large Georgian-style homes.

“You could put a flag out, it could be for your favorite team, a wreath on the door. They are like putting earrings on before you walk out the front door, ” said Woda.

Photos: If no outdoor photos were taken in warm weather, sellers should check their own photos for those showing a lush lawn and gardens, and inquire about shooting photos while the lawn is still green. Don’t discount the beauty of photos taken when the sun is shining on freshly fallen snow, a shoveled walk and inviting front entry.

Article source: http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/home-garden/bs-hm-winter-curb-appeal-20151112-story.html

Cutler Botanical Gardens earns honorable mention in national contest – Press & Sun

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Article source: http://www.pressconnects.com/story/news/2015/11/13/cutler-botanical-gardens-earns-honorable-mention-national-contest/75095518/

Master Gardener: Indoor herb gardens make vibrant centerpieces

As autumn’s chill settles in, gardens all over town are being put to bed. Thoughts of meals prepared with fresh, homegrown herbs are fading. But, even though we are heading into winter, there is still a place to grow — especially when it comes to herbs — and it is in your home. You do not need a greenhouse or cold frame to garden this winter. All you need to create an indoor herb garden, commonly called an herb bowl or basket, is a sunny room and your imagination.

Herb bowls are ideal for the holiday season. They can be given as gifts, and they make beautiful and useful centerpieces. There is nothing like having fresh herbs at your fingertips when you are roasting a holiday turkey. And, herbs can be added to winter soups, breads, butters, sauces and desserts.

To create an herb basket, first decide what you want or need for cooking. Rosemary and chives are two of my favorites; they are perfect for Thanksgiving dinner. Rosemary is wonderful for turkey and stuffing, and chives are a tasty complement to homegrown mashed potatoes. Remember that plants such as rosemary, lavender and mint should be kept in individual pots as they get large. If you decide you do not need them in the house, they can be overwintered outside.

Once you know which herbs you want to grow, it is time to get creative. You can make herb bowls, baskets and centerpieces in many ways. You can nestle herb plants together in a basket or bowl, add a little florist moss and — voila! You have a professional-looking arrangement. Or, design an elegant herb garden centerpiece using three white square pots with matching saucers and plants like thyme, sage, rosemary, oregano or mint. These herbs provide lots of texture and height variation, bringing taste and visual interest to the home. If you use a basket, be sure to line it and place a dish under the herb pot(s) inside to prevent spills from overwatering.

When shopping, look for potted plants that are clearly marked as edible herbs. Make sure the species is listed and the plants are healthy and vibrant. Don’t overdo it; if you plant too many herbs in one container, they will not thrive and can rapidly decline due to overcrowding.

Once your herb bowl is designed and planted, place it in a part of your home that is consistently warm and well-lit, receiving a minimum of six hours of sunlight per day. Keep herb baskets away from heat or air conditioning vents. There, the air will pull moisture out of the plants’ leaves, and the temperature variations will be too extreme. Sunrooms, kitchen windows or bright countertops are ideal for most herbs. If your home is naturally dark, simply purchase a grow light from a local nursery or retail store.

A well-done and well-placed herb bowl can create memorable and flavorful meals, brighten the home and alleviate gardener’s itch during the cold days of winter.

Wendy Hanson Mazet is a certified arborist and horticulturist with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. For information about gardening and landscaping in Nevada, contact a Master Gardener at 775-336-0265 or mastergardeners@unce.unr.edu, or visit www.growyourownnevada.com and www.livingwithdrought.com

Article source: http://www.rgj.com/story/life/outdoors/2015/11/12/master-gardener-indoor-herb-gardens-make-vibrant-centerpieces/75681060/

Gardening: Time to order magazines for gifts

Christmas is but six weeks away, so if you have gardeners on your holiday gift list garden magazine subscriptions are a great choice. Here’s what you’ll find on my coffee table.

The Michigan Gardener: $14/6 issues. Go to michigangardener.com and click on About Us. Distributed free to most garden centers in the Metro Detroit area, MG features articles written by local experts. A map locating many of the best garden centers in southern Michigan is priceless for plant geeks who love the thrill of the hunt. Be sure to check out the current events calendar on their website for special garden happenings. If your gardening pals live outside the Metro Detroit area, the Michigan Gardener magazine subscription is a gift of gold.

Fine Gardening: $29.95/6 issues. Call (866) 242-4199, or go to taunton.com. Geared to avid gardeners and inspired beginners, I love the pronunciation guide for featured plants. Fine Gardening is a must-read for me.

The American Gardener: $35 / 6 issues. Subscription includes membership in the American Horticulture Society. (800) 777-7931, ahs.org. Focused on green gardening, this award-winning mag is a must-read by the East Coast set. Check out the long list of membership bennies and services on the AHS website. It’s another one of my faves.

Country Gardens: $19.97/4 issues. (800) 677-0484. bhg.com. A 10 when it comes to inspiration, this award- winning magazine is a little touch of heaven on a cold gray day in February. Interesting and easy-to-do DIY garden art projects to jolly up the garden.

Garden Gate: $20/6 issues. (800) 978-9631, gardengatemagazine.com. Good choice for Yardeners, new gardeners and experienced green-thumbers who enjoy DIY projects. Contains no advertising.

Mother Earth News: $12 / 6 issues online. (800) 234-3368, MotherEarthnews.com. This green guide to healthy living includes articles on organic gardening. It’s gone a bit upscale to broaden its appeal, so you needn’t live in a yurt or in the country to enjoy it.

Garden Design: $45 /4 issues (855) 624-5110, gardendesign.com. New owners, new look, Garden Design features sophisticated designs both large and small and upscale accoutrement for outdoors.

The American Rose: $10/2 issues –trial membership. (800) 637-6534, rose.org. Membership to the American Rose Society includes their magazine dedicated to all things roses.

Michigan Gardening: $19.95/6 issues (888) 265-3600, statebystategardening.com. A good general gardening mag with articles written by Michigan and Midwest gardeners.

Do check out the websites listed. Many are chock-full of articles and info at no cost.

Nancy Szerlag is a master gardener and Metro Detroit freelance writer. Her column appears Fridays in Homestyle. To ask her a question go to Yardener.com and click on Ask Nancy. You can also read her previous columns at detroitnewscom/homestyle.

Article source: http://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/columnists/nancy-szerlag/2015/11/12/gardening-magazine-gifts/75672684/