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Archives for October 25, 2015

Editorial: Liberty Center bridge to powerful metro area


The extraordinary rise of Liberty Center in Butler County’s Liberty Township promises to transform the commercial and residential landscape of the region. However, the 100-acre, mixed-used center symbolizes much more: a development flashpoint of sorts highlighting a future where Greater Cincinnati and Greater Dayton become a single metro area.

Looking at it this way, Liberty Center represents a symbolic tipping point.

Proud members of the Butler County community rightly cheered its official opening Thursday with plans for 90 restaurants, 249 apartments and 75,000 square feet of office space amid tree-lined streets and buzz-cut landscaping.

It’s the old town square reimagined.

Columbus-based developer, Steiner and Associates, has completed similar successful projects in Beavercreek near Dayton and in Easton near Columbus. Liberty Center is a $350 million investment, and was the largest such project in the United States when the company broke ground in 2013. Its Easton location boasts 25 million visitors a year and has won a boatload of industry awards.

New development can be both risky and exciting. The crowd is always bullish at the outset. Yet, history is littered with great retail ideas and concepts that ended up as white elephants over time. For example, the once-booming malls of the 1970s fell out of favor long ago.

Today there is every reason to believe Liberty Center will succeed. The demographics support it, starting with the commercial power of Interstate 75, an international corridor running from Michigan to Florida.

Joe Hinson, president and CEO of the West Chester/Liberty Chamber Alliance, reels off more proof of the region’s role an economic juggernaut. “Fifty-four percent of the U.S. population is within a 600-mile radius. Fifty-six percent of its buying power is also within that radius,” he said.

In the more than 15 years Hinson has headed the chamber, he has seen West Chester and Liberty Township become a burgeoning bioscience, health care, retail and manufacturing destination.

A sprawling Cincinnati Children’s Hospital continues to expand minutes away from Liberty Center, creating a health care corridor with the University of Cincinnati’s West Chester Hospital, a new Christ Hospital and Atrium Medical Center in Middletown. The $13-million Butler Tech Bioscience Center began operating in West Chester in August.

The international headquarters of FORTUNE 500 company A.K. Steel is located in West Chester, and popular Swedish furniture retailer IKEA opened its only Ohio store in West Chester three years ago (another is set to open in Columbus in 2017). There are plenty more examples of economic resurgence to the south and north.

Within the next two to five years, the U.S. Census Bureau is forecasting a Cincinnati metro area that encompasses Northern Kentucky and Dayton. Suddenly, a Cincinnati metro area of 2.95 million people becomes a much more formidable player in attracting business and industry. It would rank as the 18th-largest U.S. metro area just ahead of Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Fla.

Thankfully, folks are not waiting for progress to just happen. Hinson was among regional leaders who met last spring in West Chester to discuss what a more collaborative future would look like as we move toward 2020.

“My hope is that this can benefit the entire region. This makes our entire region strong and more competitive,” Hinson said.

We couldn’t agree more.

Article source: http://www.cincinnati.com/story/opinion/editorials/2015/10/24/editorial-liberty-center-bridge-powerful-metro-area/74556808/

Janet Schoendorf: Town must set higher standard for growth

Wow! Growth has made Chapel Hill a better town? I think Dr. Hammond’s standards for what is better, deserves a reexamination (CHN, Sunday, Sept. 13). At the rate we are going, we are on track to becoming a major contributor to the sprawl that is creeping up on the Triangle. Is that really the best we can do? The town has a lot of smart people, and a highly rated planning department at UNC. Using our human and other resources wisely, we should become a model for other cities to emulate, not another example of human folly.

Dr. Hammond suggests that Eastgate was an improvement to the town, over the cow pasture that was there before, but it was built over Bolin Creek. This doesn’t sound like smart development to me. Why wasn’t the natural beauty of the creek retained and used as an enhancement to the development?

Where is the grid-like pattern of streets that allows traffic to move quickly and efficiently, and makes growth more manageable?

Where are the side walks, off-street bike paths, and well lit streets that people can use to walk or bike safely throughout the town? Where is the affordable housing so that people who work here might afford to live here also? Why don’t we embrace mixed-use zoning throughout the town, so that people can live, work, and play in the same general area, and minimize their use of the car?

Where is the edible, bio-diverse landscaping that is found in public spaces in progressive communities?

No, Dr. Hammond, the growth in Chapel Hill has not been smart growth; it has not made the town better at all.

Why aren’t we making an effort to preserve bio-diversity in both public and private spaces? Harvard biologist/naturalist E. O. Wilson proposes that half the world be saved for all other living things if we wish to preserve biodiversity, and ultimately ourselves in the long run. Both Carolina Forest North and the N.C. Botanical Garden might qualify as forest preserves that protect diverse species of plants and animals, but they are owned by UNC. Will they be protected indefinitely, or is it up to the university to decide if and when they should be used for other purposes? According to Thomas Crowther at Yale, we are losing 15 billion trees world wide, due to human activities. Do we wish to contribute to that decline?

Are there firm guidelines in place for property owners to actually become stewards of their property, looking out for future generations, and the common good, rather than just squeezing the last dollar out of their land? Consider M.C. Davis’ rewilding project in Florida for inspiration.

Why aren’t there public parks in all neighborhoods with splash pads for toddlers during our hot summers? What about a large outdoor pool at both the community center, and Umstead Park? People should not have to join expensive private clubs in order to find these things.

Flooding in many parts of Chapel Hill continues to occur after significant rainfalls because the city has allowed structures to be built in places that are not suitable for development due to inadequate drainage systems. What creative ideas is the city implementing to rectify this situation?

Is our town government coordinating development with neighboring communities so that land is used efficiently thereby minimizing the human impact on the environment? Humans keep swallowing up land like it is an unlimited resource, clear cutting and bulldozing pristine areas to make way for new construction, after destroying and abandoning the old.

No, Dr. Hammond, the growth in Chapel Hill has not been smart growth; it has not made the town better at all. We now have increased flooding, frequent traffic jams, reduced commercial options, and extreme habitat loss for indigenous species. Your standards are much too low. We in Chapel Hill, with the resources we have, both human and otherwise, can and should be doing much, much better.

Janet Schoendorf lives in Chapel Hill.

Article source: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/community/chapel-hill-news/chn-opinion/article40916829.html

Historic Capaha Park sports a new look in playground, pavilion

An old Cape Girardeau Park has a new look.

Parks and recreation department employees and volunteers gathered Friday with a group of city officials and park users at Capaha Park to celebrate the completion of a new playground and pavilion.

The playground is divided into two sections — one suited for those younger than 6, and the other geared toward children up to 12 years old. Each piece of equipment — from the dragonfly teeter-totter to the climbing rock — was designed with a nature theme in mind, incorporating other favorite outdoor amenities such as the Mississippi River.

Overlooking the playground is the large pavilion, accessible from the West End Boulevard entrance.

Until its demolition in 2011, the area was the location of the Capaha Pool.

Looking at the area now, “you would not even know that pool existed anymore,” said parks and recreation director Julia Thompson.

Mayor Harry Rediger said Cape Girardeau’s parks system is one of the city’s greatest assets. Capaha Park is the anchor of that system, he said, hosting summer band concerts, serving as a launching point for parades and host of the summer performances by the Cape Girardeau Municipal Band.

“There’s a lot of history here,” Rediger said. “I say that because Capaha has gotten to be old, gotten to be tired, and we’re doing something about that.”

The new playground equipment and pavilion is a small taste of what’s to come at the park.

St. Louis-based SWT Design worked with the parks and recreation department to create the Capaha Park Master Plan. The plan was completed about two years ago.

Thompson recognized Carrie Coyne and Jay Wohlschlaeger of SWT Design for their work on the design of the new playground and future projects.

Coyne said creating a master plan is the best way to consider the needs of the whole park and how each project fits. Looking at the big picture was a key element in the design of the playground.

“The way this plan works, each of the spaces fit together and lay in with the existing contours of the park,” she said. “We didn’t want to force it and plop a playground down in the same location just because that’s where the old one was.”

Improved access, lighting and additional seating also were addressed.

Six phases are included in the master plan. The playground and pavilion were in the first phase. The second would include a splash pad in the same area.

About $400,000 was set aside for the newly completed Phase 1 projects, funded through the 2008 voter-approved parks and recreation and stormwater tax.

Coyne, who has worked with municipalities across the state and beyond, said she found the Cape Girardeau park project unique because of the department’s work to maximize its budget and partner with the community.

Volunteers from the local craftsman union were recognized at the Friday ribbon cutting for their efforts in the construction of the 50-by-30-foot pavilion. Parks officials said their work allowed the department’s crews to focus on the playground and other park needs.

Making each dollar stretch is important, because the phases will be completed on an “as funding is available” basis. But those involved believe the plan is off to a good start.

“This is a great [project] to start with,” Wohlschlaeger said. “With this one complete, there are other opportunities to move forward with.”

The city has taken small steps toward realizing its next big plans for the park. In July, the Capaha Park band shell was renamed the Dan Cotner Amphitheatre, in honor of the Cape Girardeau Municipal Band’s most-tenured member.

The municipal band has been playing at the band shell since 1957. Band members and supporters helped raise the money to build it at no cost to the city, according to reports at the time.

The switch from band shell to amphitheater is a nod to the city’s plans for an update. Designers envision that corner of the park would have improved parking and access, new seating and improved landscaping and lighting.

As for the pond, which sits between the band shell and the new playground, it also would be spruced up. Improvements to the layout and stormwater infrastructure are a few of the ideas.

One of the final phases of the plan addresses Capaha Field, including new “green” lighting technology, improved spectator seating and a “fan deck.”

Thompson has said the department is hopeful funds will become available for these projects in the near future through grants, sponsorships or the renewal of the parks and stormwater and recreation sales tax.

A portion of the half-cent sales tax will sunset in 2018 unless voters renew it.

Plans continue to move Capaha Park forward, but Thompson said some favorite attractions will remain. Dinky, the train engine, will stay, addressing concerns she said were expressed by many park visitors. The popular disc golf course also remains, though it could be rerouted.

“I know people have a lot of very, very fond memories here, and we hope that, starting today, we can create some new ones,” Thompson said.

srinehart@semissourian.com

(573) 388-3641

Pertinent address:

Broadway and West End Boulevard, Cape Girardeau, Mo.


Projects outlined in the plan:

* A design for a new spray/splash pad.

* New parking lot for the amphitheater, new park entryway off Broadway and Perry Avenue, improved seating and access for the band shell, new lighting and possibly public art and interpretive signage.

* Improvements to the Capaha Park pond layout, banks and stormwater infrastructure, as well as pathways, seating, pavilion and restrooms.

* Improved landscaping, parking and access on both ends of the park from Liberty Corner to the Rose Garden, as well as additional pavilions, picnic areas and pathways.

* Replacing old lights at Capaha Field with new *”green*” lighting technology, a new screenboard, improved spectator seating and a *”fan deck,*” a Central Pavilion, restroom and concession stand.

Article source: http://www.semissourian.com/story/2243933.html

Improvement projects complete at Walter and Mary Burke Park in New Baltimore

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The city of New Baltimore recently celebrated the completion of three federally funded projects that aim to improve water quality in Lake St. Clair.

Walter and Mary Burke Park now boasts three new rain gardens, two electronic bird deterrents and permeable pavers, which all work to improve the quality of the stormwater runoff that enters Lake St. Clair. A ribbon-cutting ceremony took place at the park on Oct. 21 to mark the completion of the project.

“These rain gardens and the pervious pavers above them will help improve the water quality at our beach and all of Lake St. Clair,” Mayor John Dupray said. “It will do this by reducing the pollutants that drain directly into the lake and improving soil erosion and stormwater runoff.”

Two of the new rain gardens are located near the lake front by the outdoor pavilion, and the third garden is located near the swing sets.

Rain gardens are created by digging out an area and filling it with materials that allow water to run down into the ground, such as native plants with long root systems that help infiltrate water deep into the soil. This allows the ground to absorb water slowly, rather than running into the lake without treatment.

The gardens are part of a solution to occasional beach closures at Burke Park, according to the city. Stormwater runoff is a key mechanism for contaminants to reach the beach and is considered one of the biggest sources of water pollution, according to Environmental Consulting and Technology Inc., the project engineer for the improvements.

ECT determined that stormwater runoff is a probable source of E. coli. Geese and seagull droppings also contaminate the runoff, which then makes its way to the beach.

To deter geese and seagulls from the beach area, electronic audial devices have been installed on each end of the outdoor pavilion in Walter and Mary Burke Park. The devices emit bird distress cries to discourage birds from landing in the area, including the boat docks.

“The bird deterrent devices should reduce the mess the gulls and Canada geese cause and improve the health and concerns of our park visitors,” Dupray said.

New Baltimore Parks and Recreation Department Director Lee Miller said the city’s goose deterrent program was extremely successful this summer, significantly reducing the amount of goose droppings in the park. Continued…

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“As a result of that, we only had to close the public beach once the entire summer,” Miller said. “In years past, we would have to close the beach on an average three to four times, but this year, our lake water was extremely clean.”

In addition, the newly installed permeable brick pavers at the entrance to the park also work to improve water quality by allowing water to enter the soil while still providing a solid and stable walking surface. The former impervious surfaces at the entrance to the park did not absorb water, potentially allowing runoff water to carry pollutants directly into the lake.

“I think the three projects that were completed in the park have turned out very well,” Miller said. “The brick pavers at the main park entrance look great, and we are very excited to see the rain gardens grow and bloom into beautiful landscaping.”

Miller said he thinks the city’s efforts will not only benefit the nearly 1,000 people who visit the beach each weekend during the summer, but also the environment and the wildlife that lives in it.

“Lake St. Clair has an extremely vibrant eco-system with a wide variety of fish populations,” he said, “and we believe that our efforts will play a part in keeping Anchor Bay environmentally healthy.”

The projects were completed with a roughly $260,000 grant obtained through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. The work was overseen by the Macomb County Office of Public Works and was completed by Tom Ward Sons Inc. of Casco Township, Dupray said.

“I am very pleased with the quality of the work and the end results,” he said. “We were certainly fortunate to receive this federal grant and to have Macomb County Public Works Department oversee the construction, all at no cost to our residents.”

Construction took about a month and a half to complete. The popular dahlia garden is expected to return to the park next spring.

“The Koenig family has been patient through the construction and will be back with the city’s adopted flower for all to enjoy,” Dupray said.

The amount of park space was also temporarily reduced during construction due to fencing placed around the gardens. The parks and rec department worked to alleviate inconvenience by offering “construction refunds” to pavilion renters as well as an opportunity to cancel with a full refund, Miller said. Continued…

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  • 2
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  • See Full Story

The city of New Baltimore recently celebrated the completion of three federally funded projects that aim to improve water quality in Lake St. Clair.

Walter and Mary Burke Park now boasts three new rain gardens, two electronic bird deterrents and permeable pavers, which all work to improve the quality of the stormwater runoff that enters Lake St. Clair. A ribbon-cutting ceremony took place at the park on Oct. 21 to mark the completion of the project.

“These rain gardens and the pervious pavers above them will help improve the water quality at our beach and all of Lake St. Clair,” Mayor John Dupray said. “It will do this by reducing the pollutants that drain directly into the lake and improving soil erosion and stormwater runoff.”

Two of the new rain gardens are located near the lake front by the outdoor pavilion, and the third garden is located near the swing sets.

Rain gardens are created by digging out an area and filling it with materials that allow water to run down into the ground, such as native plants with long root systems that help infiltrate water deep into the soil. This allows the ground to absorb water slowly, rather than running into the lake without treatment.

The gardens are part of a solution to occasional beach closures at Burke Park, according to the city. Stormwater runoff is a key mechanism for contaminants to reach the beach and is considered one of the biggest sources of water pollution, according to Environmental Consulting and Technology Inc., the project engineer for the improvements.

ECT determined that stormwater runoff is a probable source of E. coli. Geese and seagull droppings also contaminate the runoff, which then makes its way to the beach.

To deter geese and seagulls from the beach area, electronic audial devices have been installed on each end of the outdoor pavilion in Walter and Mary Burke Park. The devices emit bird distress cries to discourage birds from landing in the area, including the boat docks.

“The bird deterrent devices should reduce the mess the gulls and Canada geese cause and improve the health and concerns of our park visitors,” Dupray said.

New Baltimore Parks and Recreation Department Director Lee Miller said the city’s goose deterrent program was extremely successful this summer, significantly reducing the amount of goose droppings in the park.

“As a result of that, we only had to close the public beach once the entire summer,” Miller said. “In years past, we would have to close the beach on an average three to four times, but this year, our lake water was extremely clean.”

In addition, the newly installed permeable brick pavers at the entrance to the park also work to improve water quality by allowing water to enter the soil while still providing a solid and stable walking surface. The former impervious surfaces at the entrance to the park did not absorb water, potentially allowing runoff water to carry pollutants directly into the lake.

“I think the three projects that were completed in the park have turned out very well,” Miller said. “The brick pavers at the main park entrance look great, and we are very excited to see the rain gardens grow and bloom into beautiful landscaping.”

Miller said he thinks the city’s efforts will not only benefit the nearly 1,000 people who visit the beach each weekend during the summer, but also the environment and the wildlife that lives in it.

“Lake St. Clair has an extremely vibrant eco-system with a wide variety of fish populations,” he said, “and we believe that our efforts will play a part in keeping Anchor Bay environmentally healthy.”

The projects were completed with a roughly $260,000 grant obtained through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. The work was overseen by the Macomb County Office of Public Works and was completed by Tom Ward Sons Inc. of Casco Township, Dupray said.

“I am very pleased with the quality of the work and the end results,” he said. “We were certainly fortunate to receive this federal grant and to have Macomb County Public Works Department oversee the construction, all at no cost to our residents.”

Construction took about a month and a half to complete. The popular dahlia garden is expected to return to the park next spring.

“The Koenig family has been patient through the construction and will be back with the city’s adopted flower for all to enjoy,” Dupray said.

The amount of park space was also temporarily reduced during construction due to fencing placed around the gardens. The parks and rec department worked to alleviate inconvenience by offering “construction refunds” to pavilion renters as well as an opportunity to cancel with a full refund, Miller said.

“There were many pieces to the puzzle for this project, and with that being considered, I think everything went very well,” he said.

Katelyn Larese is the associate editor of The Voice. She can be contacted at (586) 273-6196 or katelyn.larese@voicenews.com.

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Article source: http://www.voicenews.com/articles/2015/10/25/news/doc562a58929807a963247680.txt

Growing interest in organic



Posted Oct. 25, 2015 at 4:00 AM


Article source: http://westborough.wickedlocal.com/article/20151025/NEWS/151027006

Gardening tips to be offered

Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2015 5:00 am

Gardening tips to be offered

Sue Jones, master gardener, will present a program for a meeting of the Kokomo Garden Wall Garden Club at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 5 at the Kokomo South Branch Library, 1755 E. Center Road.

Jones will present a program highlighting gardening tips from a collection of books written by one of her favorite authors, Sharon Lovejoy.

Anyone interested in gardening, whether beginner or advanced, is welcome. For more information, call 765-432-1535.


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Saturday, October 24, 2015 5:00 am.

Article source: http://www.kokomotribune.com/news/area_briefs/gardening-tips-to-be-offered/article_1e3dc8e9-bffc-52bf-af0d-7e0b7e99283a.html

Top 20 tips for planting bulbs

1 Prepare well

Remove weeds and incorporate lots of compost or other organic matter
when planting bulbs. On heavy soils, dig in horticultural grit. Bulbs
grown in pots need good drainage so put plenty of crocks in the bottom
and use a well-drained compost. For my pots I use two parts John Innes
No 2 with one part horticultural grit. Specialised bulb composts are
expensive and only necessary in pots with poor drainage.

2 Time it right

Garden centres sell bulbs for autumn planting from the end of July
and want them out of the way by September to make room for
Christmas-tree baubles. August is far too early to plant
spring-flowering bulbs. October is the best time for daffodils;
November for tulips.


Plant daffodil bulbs in October

Credit:
Reuters

3 Big, fat and firm

When buying bulbs, reject any that are soft or showing signs
of mould. Small bulbs may not flower in their first year.

4 Dig deep

Bulbs should be planted in holes three to four times as deep as the
bulb itself. So, for example, a 1in crocus bulb needs to be planted in
a hole 3-4in deep.

5 Fritillary finesse

Clumps of Fritillaria imperialis or F. persica look magnificent but
can be difficult to achieve: on heavy soils the bulbs often rot during
their first year. Placing the bulbs in the ground on their side will
prevent water entering at the top and reduce the likelihood of them rotting.

6 Which way up?

If you are not sure, plant the bulb on its side: its stem will find
its own way up.

7 Force later

The traditional time to start forcing hyacinths into flower is the
third week of September, so they flower in time for Christmas. But
there is always a surfeit of goodies at Christmas, so consider forcing
bulbs for the lean weeks of January and February instead. Hyacinths
will flower 10-12 weeks from potting if kept in a cool, dark room (or
under a cardboard box) until they have shoots about 2in tall. ‘Paper
White’ narcissi flower 8-10 weeks from potting and don’t need to be
kept in the dark.


Hyacinth ‘Delft Blue’

Credit:
Reuters

8 Bulbs for shade

Not all bulbs need full sun. As well as woodland bulbs such as the dog’s tooth violet (Erythronium
dens-canis), and the wood anemone (Anemone nemorosa), many
Mediterranean bulbs grow well in shade. Scilla peruviana has blue
flowers the size of tennis balls and soon forms large colonies in
cool, shady situations. Its relatives, the squills – Scilla siberica
and S. bifolia – are aggressive plants that seed themselves
everywhere, but the pools of blue they form are irresistible on dull
spring days. The star-shaped flowers of Ipheion uniflorum create a
similar effect but are less invasive.

If you have rich soil with plenty of added leafmould you will be
able to grow the sumptuous black flowers of Fritillaria
camschatcensis. The most majestic bulb for the dappled shade provided
by deciduous trees is F. imperialis. A friend has masses of the deep
orange form growing against a red-brick wall underneath a fig tree.
It’s a glorious sight.

9 Plot with pots

Fill large plastic pots with your favourite bulbs and, just before they are about to flower,
use them to plug holes in the border. Plastic pots can also be slipped
inside more elegant terracotta ones and whipped out when the bulbs are
over. Store the pots behind a shed to allow the foliage to die down,
keep them weed-free, top-dress with a layer of compost in the autumn,
and bring them out again the following year.

10 Mark the spot

Plant labels can look ugly but are indispensable for marking the
position of bulbs whose foliage has died back. A discreet wooden label
will prevent the frustration caused by plunging a fork into a border
and spearing a clump of your favourite alliums.

11 Hedge dwellers

The dry conditions at the base of hedges make ideal growing
conditions for many bulbs. Tulips, and particularly species tulips,
will be very happy on the south-facing side of a hedge, and can be
left undisturbed for years. A few bulbs of Tulip whittallii planted at
the base of my beech hedge have now formed large colonies. The
bronze-orange flowers coincide with the first acid-green shoots of the beech.

On the shady side of the hedge, encourage carpets of Anemone blanda
or the mauve and lavender flowers of Chionodoxa forbesii, a prolific self-seeder.

12 Damp lovers

Most bulbs need a period of dry conditions, but some only thrive in
moist soils. In the wild, camassias grow in rich, moist meadows and
need similar conditions in the garden. Leucojums also flower better in
moist soils. The snakeshead fritillary, F. meleagris, only flourishes
when grown in a damp soil.


Snakeshead fritillary

Credit:
Alamy

13 Singular beauty

Eighteenth-century gardeners planted tulips individually, the better
to appreciate their beauty. Bulbs planted singly in small terracotta pots and
placed in an ordered manner around the garden bring instant elegance
and formality. Use lily-flowered tulips, Fritillaria persica or
large-flowered alliums.

14 Enemy tactics

The biggest destroyer of bulbs, particularly in urban gardens, is
the squirrel. Although they dig up daffodils they don’t eat them. But
they have a voracious appetite for crocus and tulips. Planting the
bulbs deeper than normal can help. Bulbs are most vulnerable after
planting, when the soil is easy for squirrels to dig. Chicken-wire
placed over the pot, or the freshly dug soil, will deter them.

15 Lawn games

It’s not just crocus that will grow in lawns and short grass. Many
miniature irises, particularly Iris histrioides, will be perfectly
happy in a lawn that does not become waterlogged. Of the dwarf
narcissi, it is the cyclamineus hybrids that are the best adapted to
the conditions. Narcissus cyclamineus ‘Jenny’, which has creamy white
flowers, spreads well in lawns. To plant, remove the turf with a
spade, place the bulbs underneath and replace the turf. Don’t cut the
lawn until the bulbs’ foliage has died down.

16 Long grass

Bulbs can also be grown in long, rough grass if you choose tall
varieties that can compete. Fritillaria pyrenaica grows to about 18in
tall and is easy and vigorous, even in grass. Narcissi are
well-adapted to growing in grass, particularly the pheasant’s eye
narcissus, N. poeticus var. recurvus, and the old-fashioned N. ‘W. P.
Milner’. To plant the bulbs, remove clumps of grass with a bulb
planter or with a mattock.

17 Viola partners

Wallflowers or forget-me-nots are the traditional partners for
tulips. In pots and window boxes use violas instead – they will start
flowering long before the tulips and provide a wide range of colour
combinations. The Sorbet series is robust and floriferous.

18 More please

For sheer flower-power, bulbs are the cheapest plants available, so don’t
stint on the quantities you plant. Even in small gardens, massed
plantings of a limited number of varieties is always most effective.
In pots, allow for a dozen tulips per 12in container.

19 Lift and repeat

Left in the ground, tulips degenerate each year until they die;
lifted, stored and replanted the following November they re-flower
well. After flowering, remove the seed head and wait for the foliage
to yellow and die back, then lift the bulbs, clean off any soil and
store in boxes or net bags in a cool, dry place.

20 Limit your layers

Plant pots and windowboxes with no more than two layers of bulbs to prevent the unsightly spectacle of
later-flowering plants appearing through the dying foliage of earlier ones.

Article source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/problem-solving/top-tips-for-planting-bulbs/

In The Garden: Tips for a healthy perennial garden



Posted Oct. 24, 2015 at 10:45 AM


Article source: http://www.uticaod.com/article/20151024/NEWS/151029647