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Archives for September 28, 2015

Bear display part of new art series on campus

Massimals on display in Lexington, Ky. on Thursday, September 24, 2015. Photo by Alex Otte | Staff.

By Sarah Brookbank

news@kykernel.com

Last week, the walk to class for many students was a little wild as four Styrofoam bears were on display on the walkway between William T. Young Library and Chemistry-Physics Building.

This outdoor installation was sponsored by the Student Activity Board’s cultural arts committee and were created by an assistant professor of Architecture in the College of Design.

Integrated strategic communication senior, Taylor Hamilton, the director of the cultural arts committee, said that the installation is a part of their ‘Art Matters’ series.

“Our goal is to make art more accessible for students, faculty and staff,” Hamilton said.

Hamilton said the arts board is small for a school the size of UK but they try to bring the fine arts to campus for reasonable prices. Their board has brought in artists to do ice and sand sculptures, and murals.

“We’re trying to show that art doesn’t have to be restricted to a museum or an exhibit,” Hamilton said.

And they did just that with the Massimal exhibit. Hamilton said they came across the work of Jason Scroggin at the Beaux Arts Ball and asked him if he would work with them.  The large bears were created and brought to campus with the help of U-hauls and SAB.

“It was easier than I thought it would be,” Hamilton said.

The Massimals were made of Styrofoam and piping and took three people to move.

When Scroggin was approached by SAB to have the Massimals outdoors, he said he was hesitant at first because the creations are lightweight.

“I knew people would kind of interact with them. I didn’t expect it to be like this though but it’s been interesting,” Scroggin said. “They’ve been putting them in compromising positions.”

Scroggin said while the display is meant to be interactive, there have been some interesting interactions. He said one of his students sent him a screenshot of the UK Snapchat story when the bears had been stacked on top of one another. Some of the installations suffered damage, one even lost a leg.

“That’s probably the frustrating part … Clearly people are getting a little bit rough with it,” Scroggin said.

The Massimal project started in 2010, when Scroggin and his design partner Akari Takebayashi, an instructor in the architecture program, were invited to show their research.

Scroggin said most of the time, artists show renderings or scale models that people can see and understand but he and Takebayashi wanted to create something interactive to show off their research.

“Our research was based in developing or enhancing the public realm. Akari, being from Japan had never seen a petting zoo before,” Scroggin said. “Some of our initial ideas for the installation were dealing with making large models and ‘how could we package it in a way people might respond to?’ And we though ‘Oh animals’.”

Scroggin and Takebayashi took the one form, made it to scale, and created different iterations of it based on their research involving surface and the manipulation of planes. So when the opportunity came to create these designs, they chose bears, a massive terrestrial animal, though whales came into the discussion at one point.

The Massimal series includes multiple bears, many of which are designed differently.

The figures are based on architectural modeling, like massing models for rooms and contour models for landscaping, where designers use foam and digital software to create examples of spaces using cubes and pixels and using planes to design landscapes. Some forms are tessellated, or folded out similar to origami, or egg-crate, where pieces of the models are slotted together to make a whole.

Since creating the original five pieces, they have created a giant rainbow Massimal for the Beaux arts ball, a Massimal out of zip ties and have an installation in Long Beach Museum of Art. They were also asked to create a Massimal tiger for China, which fell through. Scroggin said that his interest in the project is creating different designs within the constraints of the form.

“Each one was its own showcase for (architectural research) through this animal form … that people could kind of relate to,” Scroggin said.

Article source: http://kykernel.com/2015/09/26/polar-bear-displays-part-of-new-art-series-on-campus/

Fire breaks out on E 123rd Street

Julia Bianco, Director of Web MultimediaLeave a Comment

Article source: http://observer.case.edu/fire-cleveland-e-123/

Nevada Drought Forum begins deliberating ideas – Las Vegas Review

CARSON CITY — A panel of water managers and experts begin the task Monday of digesting days of public testimony and suggestions on what, if anything, Nevada should do to better prepare for lingering drought.

The Nevada Drought Forum faces a Nov. 1 deadline to submit a report to Gov. Brian Sandoval with recommendations to promote best practices for water management.

Sandoval created the forum in April after a fourth dry winter reduced many rivers and streams to a trickle, leaving many farmers will little or no water for livestock or crop irrigation.

The forum held public workshops around the state, and last week sponsored a three-day summit during which water users of all stripes — municipal and public utility managers, ranchers, farmers, mining and tourism officials — relayed conservation triumphs and future challenges.

Suggestions ranged from overhauling 150-year-old water law and creating more drought storage to allowing rain barrels and requiring more desert landscaping.

Now it is up to forum members to identify priorities. Sandoval has said recommendations likely will be part of his agenda for the 2017 Legislature.

The forum meets Monday at the Legislature Building in Carson City. The meeting will be videoconferenced to the Grant Sawyer building in Las Vegas.

— Sandra Chereb

Vegas veteran named aide to Army secretary

WASHINGTON — A decorated Vietnam veteran from Las Vegas has been appointed as a civilian adviser to the secretary of the Army.

William T. Anton was picked by Army Secretary John McHugh for the post of civilian aide. The Nevadan, a retired Army officer and veterans advocate, began in the new role this month.

Civilian aides to the secretary are community figures who represent the service at local events, and who convey local sentiments back up the chain to Army leaders. There is at least one from each state, and they serve unpaid for two-year terms.

“This needs to be truly the people’s Army. And to have that occur we have to have good folks like yourself telling the Army’s story,” McHugh told Anton at a Sept. 8 ceremony at the Pentagon.

Anton has been active in veterans service organizations in Las Vegas and advocated on behalf of disabled veterans.

Anton, president of World Technology Associations Inc., a business consulting firm, was the first Nevadan inducted into the U.S. Army Ranger Hall of Fame, in 2009. He received the Army Military Intelligence Corps Knowlton Award in 2011.

— Steve Tetreault

Article source: http://www.reviewjournal.com/politics/nevada-drought-forum-begins-deliberating-ideas

Gardening: Tips for lawn maintenance in the fall

Last week I covered things to do in the garden and promised to discuss lawns this week. First I must tell you that although I can appreciate the beauty of a lush, manicured lawn, I don’t have one. And I don’t want one. I have neither the patience nor the energy that a beautiful lawn can require. However, I do recognize the time, work and expense that lawn lovers put out to keep their yards so pristine.

It’s officially fall; autumn began early Wednesday morning. There are plenty of things that can be done now to get or keep your lawn in shape. The best option is to select the right grass for your growing conditions, correct any drainage problems, mow only when necessary, water during dry conditions and deal with any pest or disease problems as soon as they become apparent.

Plant Questions: Gardening tips for the fall

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THE SUPPORT. FROM THE VALLEY VIEW FARMS IS HERE TO ANSWER YOUR PLANT AND GARDENING QUESTIONS. THAT IS A BEAUTIFUL PLANT AND WHEN IT SPROUTS IT WILL BE NICE. WE PUT IT IN A RAVENS POT. THE GUYS ARE GOING TO WIN THIS WEEK, RIGHT? WE HAD A LOT OF FUN WITH THIS POT. LET’S GET TO THE QUESTIONS. THE GOLDEN FROND HADN’T APPEARED YET, SHOULD I WAIT? STICK IT IN THE GROUND, THEY MIGHT GET SOME OF THAT, THEY MIGHT NOT EAT IT BUT THE WEATHER WE HAVE THIS WEEK IS BEAUTIFUL FOR PLANTING. RAIN IN THE FORECAST, SO PERFECT FOR GARDENING. WHEN YOU TAKE THE MOMS — MUMS OUT TO THE GROUND? I TAKE THEM OUT THERE AND THEY DID AFTER THE WINTER AND YOU CAN CUT THEM BACK AROUND ST. PATRICK’S DAY. THEY’RE ARE A FALL ONLY PLANT AND THAT IS UNDER NATURAL BLOOMING TIME IS. YOU CUT THEM BACK A FEW TIMES DURING THE SUMMER. WHAT SHOULD YOU LOOK FOR WHEN YOU ARE BUYING THEM AND SHOULD BE THEY BE PLANTED IN SUNSHINE OR SHADE? FROM HERE ON YOU WILL GET FOUR TO EIGHT WEEKS. THE OTHER QUESTION IS ONCE THEY ARE BUT IT — BUDDED, THEIR FIND IN THE SHADE THAT I WOULD PUT THEM IN SUN. EITHER PLANTS OR FLOWERS THE NEED TO BE PLANTED NOW? THE SOIL IS PERFECT FOR, THE AIR IS WARM, THERE IS STILL RAIN. I DID PLANT SOME VEGETABLES. SOMETHING FEEDING THEM. CHECK OUT THE CABBAGE WORM. YOU MIGHT HAVE TO GO IN THERE AND GET THEM OUT. THERE ARE NATURAL WAYS TO GET

Article source: http://www.wbaltv.com/news/plant-questions-gardening-tips-for-the-fall/35414684

Garden Tips: The dilemma of determining fruit maturity and ripeness

Gardeners are often faced with the dilemma of knowing when to harvest fruits and vegetables. When is the right time to pick them, and will they ripen afterward? At the risk of revealing that I am a botany nerd, fruit are the protective female organs of flowering plants that contain their babies, or seeds. The protective fruit may be fleshy structures, like apples, or dry structures, like nuts. Apples, peaches, grapes, tomatoes, peppers and melons are all examples of fleshy fruit.

Physiologically, fruit are mature when their seeds are fully developed. However, if you have ever encountered a humongous, fully mature zucchini, you will know that the desirable stage for harvesting and eating this fruit is when they are much smaller with tender skin and undeveloped seeds. As consumers, there are some vegetable fruits that we prefer to eat when they are immature, like summer squash, and others when fully mature, like melons. When it comes to tree fruit, like apples or peaches, we usually find the fruit much tastier when fully mature and ripe.

Ripening is also a physiological process. It involves changes in the fruit, such as the flesh becoming softer and sweeter, and the skin changing from one color (often green) to another. Chemical changes can occur during ripening, including the breakdown of starches into sugars, leading to a sweeter flavor. Softening results from a change of insoluble pectin in the cell walls to soluble pectin. The acid content of the flesh also decreases as the fruit ripen.

Now back to the original question of when to pick fruit, and if they will ripen off the plant. The answer: Some do and some don’t. Because of this, horticulturists divide fruit into two groups. The group that does not ripen after picking tend to produce only small quantities of ethylene gas as they ripen. Ethylene is an odorless, naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas. It is sometimes referred to as a plant aging hormone. Fruit that do not ripen after picking include cherries, grapes, raspberries, strawberries, other berries, watermelon and citrus fruits. These are picked when fully mature and ripe.

The second group are fruit that produce greater amounts of ethylene as they ripen and do ripen after picking. These include apples, pears, peaches, nectarines, apricots, plums, cantaloupes, bananas and tomatoes. These fruit should be harvested at the right stage of ripeness after becoming fully mature. I am sometimes asked how to determine when to pick homegrown apples. It is tricky because the timing is based on the color of the skin, how easy it is to detach from the tree, flavor and softness.

Commercial fruit growers have equipment for testing skin color, amounts of sugar and flesh firmness. Gardeners should periodically check for sweetness by tasting the fruit. The flesh will be starchy if it is not ripe. Gardeners can also check the fruits’ aroma and judge skin color.

Apples change in firmness from rock hard to slightly softer flesh that gives just a bit with a press of the thumb. Ripe apples should separate from the tree fairly easily with a slight upward twist. A gardener must sacrifice a few fruit to determine the right time, but it is better than harvesting an entire crop of unripe or over-ripe fruit.

Now that fall is here, I suspect frost is not far off, so next week we will tackle picking winter squash and green tomatoes.

Marianne C. Ophardt is a horticulturist for Washington State University Benton County Extension.

Article source: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/living/home-garden/marianne-ophardt/article36784017.html

Two Writtle College alumni shortlisted for Society of Garden Designers awards

Two Writtle College alumni, who have gone onto successful and high profile careers as garden designers, have been shortlisted for Society of Garden Designers awards.

Patricia Fox, who was an Associate Student of Garden Design at the College in 2004, has been shortlisted in three categories in the SGD Awards 2015 – ‘Medium Residential Garden’, ‘Small Residential Garden’ and ‘Pocket Garden’.

Her shortlisted projects are also competing for the ‘People’s Choice Award’, which is open to a public vote.

Patricia is now Managing Director of Hertfordshire-based Aralia Gardens, which has also just been named winner of the 2015 BALI (British Association of Landscape Industries) Landscape Design Excellence Award Over £50k.

It is the latest in a string of awards for the garden design company – a multiple BALI Landscape Design Excellence Award winner and RHS Chelsea Flower Show Silver Medallist.

Helen Elks-Smith, who graduated from Writtle College with a BSc (Hons) Landscape and Garden Design in 2004, has been shortlisted in the ‘Paper Landscapes’ category of the SGD Awards for a show garden design inspired by the landscape of the New Forest.

Helen now owns Elks-Smith Landscape and Garden Design, just outside of Southampton, which has also previously won a BALI Design Excellence Award and a Silver at RHS Chelsea Flower Show.

SGD is the only professional association for garden designers in the UK and counts some of the UK’s leading garden and landscape designers among its growing membership.

The SGD Awards, which cover all aspects of design from private domestic gardens to engaging public spaces, are the first and only awards scheme dedicated to rewarding outstanding achievement in the garden and landscape design profession.

The SGD Awards were judged by an illustrious panel that included landscape architects, university lecturers, design journalists and garden historians, who shortlisted 38 entries in total.

Entries were open to projects with a practical completion period covering five years, reflecting the important contribution of time in the creation of landscape.

SGD Chair Philippa O’Brien said: “The SGD Awards are vigorously contested. With more entries than ever this year we know that we are looking at the very best in garden design. Our Awards recognise the skill and professionalism that go into creating an award-winning garden and celebrate the achievements of our Members.”

Helen and Patricia will find out if they have won at a glittering awards ceremony at London’s Landmark Hotel in January 2016, with TV personality and designer Joe Swift MSGD hosting the evening.

• You can vote for your favourite garden in the SGD Awards People’s Choice Awards from 1st October – 1st November 2015 on the SGD Awards website: www.sgdawards.com

• To find out more about garden design qualifications at Writtle College, please visit www.writtle.ac.uk

Article source: http://www.braintreeandwithamtimes.co.uk/news/south_essex_news/13785355.Two_Writtle_College_alumni_shortlisted_for_Society_of_Garden_Designers_awards/