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Archives for September 19, 2015

Fate of Draper prison site to be decided by the state

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Article source: http://universe.byu.edu/2015/09/18/fate-of-draper-prison-site-to-be-decided-by-the-state/

Find a New Job Near Peachtree Corners This Week

Businesses across the region are looking for new employees and we’ve partnered with Simply Hired to fill our searchable jobs board.

Post your job listing here.

See all of the job listings at our Peachtree Corners Patch jobs board

Here’s a sample of jobs listed on our board. Click on the job title for complete information.

Article source: http://patch.com/georgia/peachtreecorners/find-new-job-near-peachtree-corners-week

Solve your drainage problems in three steps – Marshfield News

Whether it’s the result of melting snow or a heavy rainstorm, standing water in the backyard is an unwelcome sight for any homeowner. While it’s unsightly and robs your yard of valuable green space, standing water can also cause excessive damage to your home’s foundation and even damage hardscape areas such as patios. These problems can cause thousands of dollars in repairs if left unaddressed.

So what can you do to rid your property of standing water and to prevent long-term structural damage to your home? Start with these steps.

1. Identify the problem areas

The first thing you should do is to identify problem areas, areas that routinely fill with water or could be potential targets for standing water. Look for low spots in your yard, especially areas near the home’s foundation or hardscape where standing water could result in immediate damage.

Areas of concern near your home could also be the result of rain water runoff from the house itself. Check to see that your downspouts are not obstructed in any way and inspect your driveway to see if water is accumulating near the garage door. Water in this region can easily enter your home. Another thing you can do is consult with your neighbors to see if they are experiencing any flooding issues. If they are, it may be a sign that you live in an area with a high water table. Online tools are available to help you identify sources and solutions for your drainage problems.

2. Solve your drainage problems

Once you have identified the problem areas on your property, it’s time to determine how to fix it permanently. Most people try to move dirt and other simple remedies to save money, however, these fixes are temporary and do not work long term.

For a more permanent solution, you may prefer to hire a contractor.

You may have also heard the term “French drains” used as a drainage solution and wondered how that helps. French drains are comprised of a trench filled with gravel and perforated pipe that has been wrapped with a sediment shield fabric to create a void space underground. This prevents water from puddling above ground.

3. Alternative drainage solutions techniques: Lean on landscaping

For standing water danger areas farther away from the home, a landscaping project can offer a scenic solution. Consider building a rain garden in the wet region with prairie plants such as purple cone flowers or black-eyed susans. If you have the space, willow, river birch and bald cypress trees all thrive in areas where their roots will be constantly wet. These landscaping ideas can help you combat standing water problems however you cannot rely on the plants alone to handle your water issue. They will be of some help, but you will need a more permanent drainage solution like those discussed above in order to protect your home’s foundation.

If seasonal weather changes make your home feel like pond-front property every year, you don’t have to put up with it. And, given the potential for significant structural damage, you shouldn’t. Solving your drainage problems starts with understanding the unique situation on your property and acting efficiently.

Courtesy of Brand Point.

Article source: http://www.marshfieldnewsherald.com/story/news/local/2015/09/18/solve-drainage-problems-three-steps/72403390/

Park pops up on Allen Street

Community

Crash raises safety concerns for Haines Township residents

Article source: http://www.centredaily.com/2015/09/18/4927631/park-pops-up-on-allen-street.html

Miller Garden Club resumes meetings with landscaping speaker

GARY | The first fall meeting of the Miller Garden Club will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Marquette Park Aquatorium, 6918 Oak Ave. on the lakefront.

The featured speaker will be Jim Bertrand, founder of Bertrand Landscape Company, Monee, Ill., who studied botany and environmental biology.

He founded Bertrand Landscape more than 25 years ago to design and install landscapes that delight and bring families together. “What interests me the most is discovering how you would like to live with your outdoors to fully enjoy your home,” he said.

The Garden Club meets the third Saturday of the month at 10 a.m. and speakers are scheduled on subjects ranging from gardening to ecology. Refreshments are served and the public is welcome.

Club volunteers work to beautify the community, tending to gardens along the Lake Street business district and the South Shore train station, the library and other locations.

Article source: http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/lake/gary/miller-garden-club-resumes-meetings-with-landscaping-speaker/article_8bb06e1c-5afb-534f-9616-2ad9ed6c0156.html

Gardening Tips: Combating wild mushrooms, fire ants

Article source: http://www.rrdailyherald.com/opinion/gardening-tips-combating-wild-mushrooms-fire-ants/article_d5a6ab34-5e2c-11e5-979b-872ce21f836e.html

Small space can give big appeal | Home and Garden tips

As we seek to simplify our lives, the desire for small-space living – even one-room living – seems more attractive than ever. But whether you’re ready to join the tiny house movement or just want to get the most out of a compact space in your home, there are easy things you can do to make a small space look, feel and function like a larger one.

“There’s no need to sacrifice great design if you live in a small space. A few simple changes are all you need to make it feel bigger, more beautiful and a reflection of your personality,” says Jackie Jordan, director of color marketing, Sherwin-Williams.

Look overhead and underfoot. Consider using every conceivable space to please the eye – even the ceiling. “I love the idea of reflecting the shape of your dining room table with a bold accent color on the ceiling above it,” says Jordan. Another idea: define a space at the floor level with an area rug beneath a couch and side table.

Multitasking solutions. If you’re always multitasking, your furniture can do the same. Place an ottoman with a hidden storage compartment or flip-top serving tray beside a comfy chair. Move a twin bed next to the wall and add big patterned pillows to create seating space by day, and sleeping space by night. The pillows can also provide extra floor seating for entertaining.

Have lofty ambitions. Consider creating a sleeping loft. It’s not only cozy, but leaves extra living space below. A Murphy bed that folds up discretely into the wall is another space saver.

Get creative with cabinetry. Take advantage of cabinetry with built-in storage features, from pullout racks that create added pantry space, to bathroom cabinets equipped with laundry hampers, hair dryer hooks and bins for grooming items.

Expect the unexpected. Instead of painting the outside of your front door to make a bold statement, paint the inside of the door with a pop of color.

 

Article source: http://www.maplevalleyreporter.com/lifestyle/328265141.html

The Late Show: Alan Titchmarsh’s tips on growing autumnal plants in your garden

These are well worth planting in any flower border and vary in height from about a foot to four or five feet, although the taller ones will need staking at the back.

Look out for the varieties of Aster novi-belgii such as ‘Jenny’, 12ins with rosy purple flowers, ‘Marie Ballard’, 3ft and pale blue, ‘Chequers’, 2ft and purple, and ‘Kristina’, 12ft and white. They all come in various heights and shades.

If you’d like a vivid splash of orange and a talking point, seek out the Chinese lantern flower Physalis alkekengi, whose papery orange lanterns really light up a border. It is happy in any half-decent soil. Too happy, some would say, since it is eager to spread sideways. But compared with ground elder it’s an amateur, and easily pulled up from where it is not wanted.

A dull September garden? Not if you plant wisely. There’s plenty to delight you for a few weeks yet.

Don’t miss Alan’s gardening column today and every day in the Daily Express. For more information on his range of gardening products, visit alantitchmarsh.com.

Article source: http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/garden/605306/How-to-grow-autumnal-plants-in-your-garden

Interested in an urban garden? Here’s some tips on getting around legislative …



By Heather Neikirk

Special to the Beacon Journal


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Apprentices Eric Hussey (left) and Christopher Braun weed a kale garden and thin lettuce plants on the rooftop garden of McCormick Place west in Chicago on June 2. The McCormick Place Garden is managed by Windy City Harvest, a sustainable agriculture program out of the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Urban Agricultural Department. (Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune/TNS)




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Apprentice Christopher Braun heads back with lettuce plants on the rooftop garden of McCormick Place west in Chicago on June 2. The McCormick Place Garden is managed by Windy City Harvest, a sustainable agriculture program out of the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Urban Agricultural Department. (Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune/TNS)








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Article source: http://www.ohio.com/lifestyle/food/interested-in-an-urban-garden-here-s-some-tips-on-getting-around-legislative-barriers-1.625271

USPS, EPA partner for rain garden, training session in Hinsdale

Click photo to enlarge

HINSDALE, N.H. GT;GT; The stormwater management training offered at Hinsdale Town Hall this week included hands-on education, as attendees rolled up their sleeves to install a rain garden next to the town’s Post Office.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Postal Service teamed up to host a program on Sept. 17 and 18 centered around green infrastructure techniques, including an educational meeting and installation of a rain garden designed by Tom Benjamin of Wellnesscapes in Northampton, Mass. On Sept. 17, the roughly 12 trainees at Town Hall on Main Street took a break for lunch around 1 p.m. and later headed next door, where Benjamin explained the finer points of the garden that serves as part of the EPA’s Making a Visible Difference in Communities Initiative. The other locations chosen in the Northeast are Brattleboro, Vt., Lawrence, Mass., and Bridgeport, Conn.

Benjamin told the Reformer the rain garden is intended to pre-treat stormwater run-off from the Post Office’s roof before it absorbs into the soil and into the river.

“Previously, all that water would just fall on this semi-compacted gravel driveway and just kind of flow towards the river and not be treated,” he said, adding that the untreated water can carry sediment that can clog the river and dangerous pollutants such as chemicals and heavy metals from vehicles. “When rain falls on a relatively hard surface like (the driveway), it doesn’t get into the ground — so it’s an issue of quantity of water and the rate at which it’s going into the river. This is slowing everything down.

“This was made to be a little deeper garden than some other ones, partially because we didn’t have a lot of room to work with here,” he continued. “Ideally, I would have set this garden further away from this building, but the width of the trucks is our constraint here. They’re bringing box trucks in here that are like the longest ones that are just short of being a tractor-trailer.”

Benjamin said the rain garden spans about 550 square feet and is 55 long feet long and an average of 11 feet wide. He mentioned more than 500 plants (all native to New England) are being installed and come from Nasami Farm Nursery in Whately, Mass. He said he got the plants for a great deal — about $2,000.

“The plants that are here are very, very drought-tolerant,” he told the Reformer. “These are really resilient plants.”

Benjamin mentioned the Hinsdale Highway Department did the excavation work for the rain garden. The building is owned by Patchwork Realty LLC, though the driveway is town property.

The USPS paid for the materials and installation and Environmental Specialist Julie Theroux said it cost roughly $4,800.

Sheryl Rosner, a senior adviser for EPA Region 1, said she was looking forward to the installation being complete.

“I’m very excited for this project. It’s a great example of what we can do in a small town,” she said. “Hinsdale was chosen partly because they have experienced flooding.”

Inside Town Hall, presentations about stormwater pollution, rain garden design and plant choices were delivered by a variety of people, including, Edwin “Smokey” O. Smith, Anne Fenn of EPA New England, and Amy Rowe, an educator from Rutgers University in New Jersey.

Contact Domenic Poli at 802-254-2311, ext. 277.

Article source: http://www.reformer.com/news/ci_28837901/usps-epa-partner-rain-garden-training-session-hinsdale