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Archives for March 20, 2015

Five outdoorsy things to do this weekend

1. LEARN ABOUT THE CHUMASH AND SPRING: Learn why the Chumash and other Native American cultures celebrated the Spring Equinox during a special storytelling hour Saturday in Newbury Park.

Ted and Dennis Garcia will lead the event, which starts at noon at the Satwiwa Native American Indian Culture Center. Satwiwa means “the bluffs” and was the name of a nearby Chumash village.

The event is free. For more information, call 370-2301. For directions go to http://1.usa.gov/19Fa5vL.

2. CLEAN A RIVER: Spend Saturday morning helping the Ventura Hillsides Conservancy clean up along the Ventura River, a stone’s throw from the Pacific Ocean. From 9 a.m. to noon, the group will be between the Highway 101 underpass and the railroad trestle behind the Ventura County Fairgrounds. Park in the free lot at Main and Peking streets, or ride — the bike path borders the property.

Along with garbage, volunteers will help remove invasive species, including arundo. Bring closed-toe shoes and wear pants. Tools and water will be provided.

While you’re in town, check out why Men’s Journal ranked Ventura a top place to live.

3. MEET A LION: This is the first of three weekends to catch Moorpark College America’s Teaching Zoo’s “Spring Spectacular.” The event features animal shows, a kids zone, food, games and prizes. You’ll also be introduced to the zoo’s newest lion.

The event runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 7075 Campus Road.

Admission is $10 for adults and $7 for children over age 2. No credit cards accepted, so bring cash or check. For more information, call 378-1441 or go to moorparkcollege.edu/zoo.

Can’t make it this weekend? The spectacular continues March 28-29 and April 4-5.

4. DO A 5K: On Sunday, walk or run a 5K in Agoura Hills, then stay for the festivities. The 9th Friendship Circle 5K Run/Walk takes place at Willow Elementary at 29026 Laro Drive.

For the first time, it will be a chip-timed race. Runners set off at 9 a.m. followed by walkers at 9:15 a.m.

Stay until noon for the festivities that include food, face painting, a vendor expo, musical performances and a fire truck.

All money raised will go to The Friendship Circle, a nonprofit that works with those who have special needs.

For more information, go to www.friendshipwalk.org. Race fees are $40 for runners. Walkers can participate for free, but donations are welcome.

5. GO HOME GARDENIN’: The Ventura Home Garden Show “Spring Show” starts Friday at the Ventura County Fairgrounds and keeps going all weekend. Visit exhibits for outdoors ideas on landscaping, fencing and pools, and ideas for inside projects including cabinetry, windows and floors.

The show goes until 6 p.m. Friday, Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The fairgrounds are at 10 W. Harbor Blvd. Admission is $5. Children under 12 are free.

Article source: http://www.vcstar.com/news/outdoors/five-outdoorsy-things-to-do-this-weekend_27128587

For some startups, better late than never




Yuanyuan Yin and her husband, Dylan Murphy, were both building successful careers at IBM when two events caused the Newton couple to reassess their busy, corporate-focused lives.

Early last year, Murphy’s brother, Josh Krauss of Long Beach, N.Y., unexpectedly died at age 32. A few weeks later, Yin endured a lengthy hospitalization and recovery from severe food poisoning while visiting her family in China.

Continue reading below

“After those experiences back to back, we just said, ‘What are we doing? Are we leaving the mark we want?’ ” Murphy recalled. “A lot of priorities got reset when we realized what was really important to us: family, friends, and doing something we’re really passionate about to help this world beyond our personal careers.”

Yin, 31, and Murphy, 32, quit their jobs to start a business that would add inspiration and meaning to their lives.

SuperHealos
, which they launched with cofounder Kathryn Jones of Milford in December, offers morale-boosting hospital gowns, capes, and accessories to comfort and empower children coping with medical issues, grief, bullying, and other challenges.










They are among a growing number of established professionals who are running or starting their own business, according to Andrew Corbett, professor of entrepreneurship and faculty director of the John E. and Alice L. Butler Venture Accelerator Program
at Babson College in Wellesley.

“There’s a misconception where we look at entrepreneurs like rock stars and think, ‘I can’t be like that. I can’t do that,’ ” he said. “The fact is, there is a proven method of teaching the entrepreneurial skill set and mind-set, which I firmly believe are valuable for any of us.”

Corbett is a coauthor of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor’s 2013 United States Report

, which showed that 39 million Americans, or nearly 13 percent of the 18- to 64-year-old working-age population, were running or starting their own business — the highest rate of entrepreneurship reported among 25 developed economies in North America, Europe, and Asia.

There were seven female entrepreneurs for every 10 males, with entrepreneurship rates peaking in mid-career (20 percent in ages 35 to 44) for men and early to mid-career (13 percent among both ages 25 to 34 and 35 to 44) for women. Yet, Americans in the 55- to 64-year-old age group emerged as the fastest-growing segment worldwide.

Kayana Szymczak for the Boston Globe

Jonathan Gouveia (center) with his family in their North Reading home.

Mid-career and senior entrepreneurship makes perfect sense, Corbett said, since mature workers generally have broad experience, a modicum of financial independence, and greater risk tolerance. Regardless of age, he said, entrepreneurship is an attainable goal.

Although Jonathan Gouveia isn’t from an entrepreneurship-minded family, the 42-year-old North Reading resident said he “just dove right in” after settling on a plan to make some additional income in late 2002.

Having been in several weddings, he reflected on the variety of groomsmen gifts — among them, an action hero figurine and a cooler filled with Bud Light —
that suggested the grooms had struggled for ideas.

After his research confirmed the market opportunity, Gouveia launched Groomsday (www.groomsday.com)
in early 2003. The website sells traditional gifts such as beer mugs and steins, along with personalized whiskey barrel signs and the Scorzie Koozie,
a beer chiller and game score keeper.

Gouveia, who works full time at a search marketing agency in Waltham, said his business generates a “modest” income, and is preferable to a second job outside the home.

“You really have to work hard, especially when you first get a business going, but I like being my own boss,” he said. “I like . . . calling my own shots. Even if they’re wrong sometimes, they’re still mine.”

Three Concord residents are pinning their entrepreneurial hopes on the Doggy Ditty, a cotton bag with water-resistant lining and a 4½-foot leash/carrying strap. It is aimed at dog owners wanting to carry items such as plastic bags, treats, a ball, keys, and cellphone while out walking their pets.

Eight years ago, Tina Labadini left her job as an office manager for her husband Kevin’s
landscaping and car wash companies to open Tina Labadini Designs, specializing in stationery, housewares, and children’s clothing adorned with her whimsical artwork. Last fall, the 44-year-old mother of three collaborated with designer Paula Lublin, 41, and entrepreneur Mimi Rutledge, 53, to add a line of their patent-pending Doggy Ditty bags.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Concord residents (from left) Paula Lublin, Mimi Rutledge, and Tina Labadini model their company’s Doggy Ditty bags.

The idea for the Doggy Ditty came up while Labadini and Rutledge were walking their dogs in Walden Woods about a year ago. The women brought in Lublin through a mutual friend to design the prototype. The finished product launched in November, and is available online (www.tinalabadini.com) and in 20 New England stores.

“A partnership is always an adventure, but it makes me very happy to create a product with these fabulous women,” Labadini said.

Meanwhile, the founders of SuperHealos (www.facebook.com/superhealos) recently exceeded their $10,000
goal on Kickstarter.com to publish their first educational coloring book. They also plan to design new hospital gowns with SuperHealos characters, and sell other companies’ products.

“Massachusetts is a great place to start a business,” said Yin, an MBA student at Babson who used the accelerator program to develop SuperHealos.
In addition to support from Babson, including three months of free office space through its Hatchery Program, Yin and her husband have attended workshops organized by MassChallenge and benefited from several state government resources.

At Babson, aspiring business starters can also take advantage of undergraduate programs, a weeklong Entrepreneur’s Boot Camp, and open enrollment classes.

And there are other ways to learn about entrepreneurship.

Middlesex Community College has opened an Innovation Development Entrepreneur Assistance Center in Henderson Hall on its Bedford campus. The IDEA Center connects students with resources and expertise to help organize, launch and manage successful new ventures. Its speaker series is open to the public.

TechSandBox, an innovation incubator in Hopkinton, provides a variety of programs geared both toward technology-based startups and general business topics such as marketing and financing, said founder and CEO Barbara Finer

Since November, the Shrewsbury Public Library has hosted monthly meetings known as the Greenhouse for Entrepreneurs, where people who want to get their ideas going or are willing to share their experience can mingle. The free series is facilitated with the help of Krosslink.org
, which aims to foster local entrepreneurship through public libraries.

That kind of networking is essential for the success of fledgling startups.

“The process can be lonely and very difficult, especially in the beginning, which is why it’s so important to go out and talk to other people doing it,” Yin said. “They’re everywhere.”

Entrepreneurship rates for males and females by age group

SOURCE: 2013 United States Report of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor

Globe correspondent Christopher Gavin contributed to this report.
Cindy Cantrell can be reached at cindycantrell20@gmail.com.

Article source: http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/regionals/west/2015/03/19/mid-career-professionals-increasingly-create-startup-companies/3tvqrSMgcQWGMJRQaZE9jI/story.html

Plantasia brings Spring to Hamburg – WKBW

HAMBURG, N.Y. (WKBW) – Spring is kicking off on day two of Plantasia, the premier garden and landscape show in western New York.

Vendors and companies have filled the Hamburg Fairgrounds Event Center with flowers, trees and outdoor living ideas. Gardening centers have experts on hand for advice.

Chris Zeisz, the show chair, says they expect to see people asking about gardening after such a brutal winter. There “could be some damage from the weight of the snow, the ice,” Zeisz said. He adds that leaves, shrubs and branches may all have taken a hit. Zeisz also says some plants may start out okay, but not make it through the spring and summer.

However, there is some good news. “Bulb material is totally fine,” Zeisz said, adding that “perennials should be fine,” as long as they are hearty enough to weather a western New York winter.

Many go to the Garden and Landscape Show in search for gardening tips. Zeisz says his biggest tip is to, “make sure you have the right information going in, that the plant you’re going to purchase is correct for the area.” He encourages the public to go to local gardening centers.

The show also features landscaping ideas, including outdoor furniture. “It’s a matter of trying to bring yours indoors outside,” Zeisz said. “People want to fix it up so they can spend more time out in the garden.”

Plantasia runs at the Hamburg Fairgrounds Event Center from 10 a.m. thru 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m. thru 5 p.m. on Sunday.

Adults get in for $9.00. Senior citizens get in for $7.00. Children 12 years old and younger get in for free.

Plantasia also features family fun, including a garden for children and a chance to meet the characters from Frozen.

For more information, click here.

Article source: http://www.wkbw.com/news/spring-time-at-plantasia

How to reduce your water usage

More than 1 trillion gallons of water are wasted in American homes every year from easy-to-fix leaks. 9NEWS at 7 a.m. 03/20/15.

Article source: http://www.9news.com/story/news/local/2015/03/20/fix-a-leak-week/25072823/

Wine, gardening and REO Town bash in Lansing this weekend

Spring is officially here, and it’s a great time to get out and enjoy temperatures that aren’t completely freezing. In that spirit, here are a few events to put on your calendar this weekend. Enjoy!

REO Town Thrift Store Gala

The second annual REO Town Thrift Store Gala happens Saturday at the Foliage Design Systems of Mid-Michigan, with proceeds benefiting the REO Town Commercial Association. Attendees are encouraged to sport their gently used suits and ball gowns for a night of music, comedy, burlesque, local food and more, all to support the community.

“‘Thrift store fancy’ is our best descriptor of the dress,” said Ryan Wert, president of the REO Town Commercial Association and head of Lansing’s Elm Street Recording, when asked about the event’s attire. “Suits, prom dresses— whatever people find at thrift stores is the concept.”

Last year’s even drew 200 attendees. This year, they’re hoping for 250.

“It was really fun last year,” Wert said. “Going into it, we didn’t know how it would go, because it’s a unique thing, but it was an awesome night. Everyone showed up in dressy coats and stilettos and sequins, and everyone looked super fabulous.”

Burlesque entertainment will come from the Klaw Mark Kittens, Mia D. Vine, Cinna Moan, Sadie Sparkles and Gala Delish. Other performers include James Gardin, Abbey Hoffman, Iris Thompson, Kathie Dunbar, Emily Dievendorf, Jeff the Magician, Ed Venture, Ixion Theatre Ensemble and DJ Sammy. Decadence Dolls’ photo booth will also be on hand.

More information: www.Facebook.com/reotown

Details: REO Town Thrift Store Gala and Burlesque Extravaganza, 8 p.m. Saturday at Foliage Design Systems of Mid-Michigan, 1027 S. Washington Ave, Lansing, tickets $10 in advance via www.thriftstoregala.com, $15 at the door, 18 and up.

Lansing Home and Garden Show Highlights

The spirit of the Lansing Home Garden Show is local and alive. This year’s event, which will run Thursday through Sunday at the MSU Pavilion, features more than 300 mid-Michigan exhibitors offering products and services to get your home ready for the warm season.

Don Engebretson will headline the Garden Stage. Engebretson, a landscape designer and garden writer, is known for his landscaping know-how on HGTV and Hometime. He’ll offer tips on crafting cool and creative containers and more.

The show’s indoor gardens will be packed with thousands of blooming perennials and annuals, trees, shrubs, water gardens and more.

Other activities include Mad Dog and Merrill sharing their “Backyard Grillin'” tips, the “Plant Michigan Green” Garden Stage with seminars by members of the Michigan Nursery and Landscape Association, a “Smart Gardening” series with MSU Extension master gardeners, a cooking stage with Chef Angus Campbell, the Lansing State Journal Home Stage with seminars from professionals in home construction, remodeling, budgeting and more.

Saturday is family day, with special kids’ activities. Children under 15 get in free until noon on Saturday, too.

More information: www.LansingHomeShow.com

How to go: Lansing Home Garden Show, 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, noon to 9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, MSU Pavilion, tickets are $9 for adults and $4 for children 6 to 14 and available for purchase online at www.LansingHomeShow.com or at the door. Children 5 and under are free. On Saturday, children under 15 get in free until noon.

Wine Tasting Benefit

Wine lover? Well, then how does a wine tasting event with 175 different kinds of wine sound? Oh, and it’s for a good cause. The Kellogg Hotel Conference Center hosts its annual wine tasting benefit for the MSU Museum Friday, offering live music, door prizes, a silent auction and, yes, wine.

The MSU Museum puts on a variety of events throughout the year, including the annual Great Lakes Folk Festival in August, and events such as this one helps keep the museum going strong.

More information: www.museum.msu.edu

How to go: Wine Tasting Benefit for the MSU Museum, 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Friday, the Kellogg Hotel Conference Center, 219 S. Harrison Rd, East Lansing, 432-4000, tickets $45 general admission online via www.museum.msu.edu.

Article source: http://www.lansingstatejournal.com/story/life/2015/03/20/lansing-events-reo-town-fundraiser/25071765/

Five homeowners win Florida Friendly landscaping award

Ever wonder if your lawn and garden is the best? Maybe not from a “magazine spread” perspective, but from the viewpoint of best practices gardening? The Florida Friendly Landscaping program was developed to help homeowners beautify and protect our wonderful state of Florida by guiding us in making good choices in our yards. A small team of enthusiastic Master Gardeners can visit your home and talk to you about landscape conservation and ecology and suggest improvements.

2014 was a banner year with five Leon County residences recognized for Florida Friendly Landscaping. Gold Awards were given to Robin and Russ Frydenborg and Robert and Debora Swoboda. Silver Awards went to Mike Fagan, Jim and Sandy Defoe, and Sandy Layne and Bob Graves.

Through Leon County’s Extension Office, Master Gardener volunteers surveyed each of these properties looking at nine basic landscaping principles. We use research based criteria that addresses water conservation as well as protection of water quality and other natural resources.

By keeping the entire tract natural, the Frydenborg lot is considered an educational model for a woodland look. The Swoboda property is particularly pleasing to the eye, incorporating a healthy approach to landscaping using education first, then planning and planting the yard.

Recognition of superior landscaping practices by homeowners centers on three concepts — required best practices, aesthetics and nine principles of good gardening. All of these homeowners identified commonly found exotic invasive plants and removed them when found. (Local yards often contain Chinese tallow tree, kudzu, air potato, Japanese climbing fern, bush morning glory and/or cogon grass.) They avoided use of “weed and feed” products and overuse of pesticides and herbicides. Also, each of these award winning yards was found to contain a number of unique plant species.

Aesthetics in these gardens reflect active management of the landscape including appropriate pruning, defined beds, appropriate handling of debris and fitting into the local community.

Embracing the nine principles of Florida-Friendly Landscaping, these properties model Right Plant, Right Place. Selecting plants that thrive in our area without extensive use of chemicals or water has significant pay-off, environmentally. These homeowners recognize the importance of a pH soil test as well as placement of plants and turf for function and to prevent erosion. Use of water, fertilizers, mulch, attracting wildlife, managing yard pests, recycling, reducing storm water runoff and protecting the waterfront are the other eight landscape practices followed by these homeowners.

Any homeowner may request a Florida Yards and Neighborhoods survey through the Leon County Extension Office — by phone, email or in person. Many requests are made during the office’s Open House events. A team of up to three Master Gardeners is assigned; an actual survey may take up to two hours. In follow-up, a written report is given to the homeowner detailing the team’s findings. Arranging a team visit may take a few weeks, depending on weather and the availability of experienced Yard Advisors.

Do you think your yard is Florida-Friendly? Want to make it better? Ask us to help.

Linda Knopf is a Master Gardener at the University of Florida IFAS Extension in Leon County and the Chair of the Florida Yards Neighborhoods Program. For gardening questions, email us at Ask-A-Mastergardener@leoncountyfl.gov.

Article source: http://www.tallahassee.com/story/life/home-garden/2015/03/19/five-homeowners-win-florida-friendly-landscaping-award/25053803/

Tips to jumpstart your garden this spring

Article source: http://www.620wtmj.com/news/local/Tips-to-jumpstart-your-garden-this-spring-297044521.html

Gardening Tips: Spring is here, so is the crabgrass

Matt Stevens

Matt Stevens



Posted: Friday, March 20, 2015 10:45 am

Gardening Tips: Spring is here, so is the crabgrass


0 comments

Spring is officially here, which means in a few short weeks we’ll stop worrying about weeds like henbit (currently in full purple bloom in many lawns across Halifax County) and instead will be cursing crabgrass. Crabgrass is an annual summer weed most people are quite familiar with but have a hard time getting under control. That’s because although there are a number of herbicide products available to control crabgrass, these products work in different ways and will only work if applied at the right time and in the right conditions.

For crabgrass, the best time to treat is right now. A herbicide is generally available in one of two forms — a pre emergent or post-emergent control. Pre emergent herbicides work specifically to prevent the weed seed from coming up, and are only effective before germination happens. Once the weed has begun to grow and is visible in your yard, pre emergent herbicides will not kill it. Post-emergent herbicides will kill weeds that have already sprouted and are actively growing, but won’t necessarily prevent new weed seeds from germinating.

Crabgrass can be a tricky problem because the herbicides most readily available and most effective at controlling crabgrass are the pre emergent type, yet we tend to forget about treating the problem until the crabgrass actually arises, at which point is too late to apply pre emergent herbicides. Pre emergent crabgrass controls need to be applied at about the time when forsythia bloom in order to be effective and I noticed my first forsythia flowers earlier this week. Pre emergent herbicides like pendimethalin (Scotts Halts), prodiamine (Barricade) or dithipyr (Dimension) therefore need to be applied as soon as possible.

If you are unable to get these pre emergent herbicides out quickly and the crabgrass germinates, they will no longer be effective at stopping its growth. With that in mind, let’s look at some post emergent crabgrass controls. Acclaim Extra (contains the chemical fenoxaprop) is a good option to control young crabgrass on cool season grasses such as bluegrass, fescue and ryegrass. This herbicide should not be applied to bermudagrass or centipede lawns, as it will cause damage to these grasses.

Post-emergent herbicides with the active ingredients DSMA or MSMA can be used on bermudagrass, as can products containing quinclorac, such as Drive 75DF. Unfortunately, post-emergent herbicide options of centipede grass are pretty limited. Incidentally, the best way to control henbit (purple-flowering weed) is by using many of the same pre emergent herbicides I recommended for crabgrass, but applying in the fall. Since it’s obviously too late for that now, if you have henbit you’d like to get rid of, use 2-4, D for cool season grasses and centipede (use half the recommended rate on centipede lawns to avoid damage) or roundup on still dormant bermudagrass. You can also simply mow the henbit and wait for it to die out in warm weather a few weeks from now.

Matthew Stevens is the horticulture extension agent for Halifax County Cooperative Extension. If you have any questions about this article or other aspects of your home gardening, contact Matthew at 252-583-5161 or matt_stevens@ncsu.edu.


© 2015 The Daily Herald. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Friday, March 20, 2015 10:45 am.

Article source: http://www.rrdailyherald.com/opinion/columns/gardening-tips-spring-is-here-so-is-the-crabgrass/article_c99a3cfa-cefa-11e4-a1d4-27a514922c4d.html

English Gardens presenting free garden party weekend

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Photo courtesy of English Gardens

View and purchase photos

English Gardens is hosting two days packed with free informative gardening seminars on March 28 and 29.

Presentations and speakers include:

*Troubleshooting in the Garden by Nancy Szerlag, Detroit News columnist, at 10 a.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. Back by popular demand, Szerlag will share tips to a more successful garden in this fun and informative talk.

*Garden Advice: The Best of the Best by Janet Macunovich at 11 a.m. March 29 at the Dearborn Heights location. Macunovich will be back to share advice on a wide range of gardening topics, including choosing the right plant, properly preparing the soil, watering at the right time of day and lots more.

*Best Tips for a Green Lawn by Ashton Ritchie, Scotts Company at 12:30 p.m. March 29 at the Dearborn Heights location. Lawn expert Ritchie will share his 40+ years of experience on how to make your lawn the envy of the neighborhood. He’ll provide tips for growing a beautiful green, lush lawn and answer all your questions.

*The New American Lawn by Barry Green and Jonathon Green at 1 p.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. Great lawns start with great soil. Learn about the four steps to growing a beautiful lawn this year.

*The Thrills Spills of Container Gardening by Four Star Greenhouses at 3:30 p.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. Growing plants and flowers in containers is a great way to enjoy a spot of color anywhere. We’ll share lots of ideas and inspiration to add an updated flair to your gardens this year.

*Stop Browsing Deer Rabbits from Destroying your Garden by Julia Hofley at 4 p.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. Learn the best techniques to keep your plants from getting eaten from neighborhood rabbits and deer.

*Natural Approaches to Preventing Animal Insect Damage by Marilyn Cox of I Must Garden at 2:30 p.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. At one time or another, every gardener faces issues with pests. Whether crawling, burrowing, chewing or gnawing, animals and insects can be very frustrating, causing problems not only to the beauty and health of our garden, but to our sanity as well. We don’t have to let pests get the better of us – or our passion for gardening. In this seminar we will explore options to protect your flowers and plants naturally, safely and effectively.

*The Basics of Landscape Design by English Gardens landscape designers at 11:30 a.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. The difference between a beautiful landscape and an exceptional one is a design. Learn how to create an exceptional landscape with tips from the professionals. Continued…

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English Gardens is hosting two days packed with free informative gardening seminars on March 28 and 29.

Presentations and speakers include:

*Troubleshooting in the Garden by Nancy Szerlag, Detroit News columnist, at 10 a.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. Back by popular demand, Szerlag will share tips to a more successful garden in this fun and informative talk.

*Garden Advice: The Best of the Best by Janet Macunovich at 11 a.m. March 29 at the Dearborn Heights location. Macunovich will be back to share advice on a wide range of gardening topics, including choosing the right plant, properly preparing the soil, watering at the right time of day and lots more.

*Best Tips for a Green Lawn by Ashton Ritchie, Scotts Company at 12:30 p.m. March 29 at the Dearborn Heights location. Lawn expert Ritchie will share his 40+ years of experience on how to make your lawn the envy of the neighborhood. He’ll provide tips for growing a beautiful green, lush lawn and answer all your questions.

*The New American Lawn by Barry Green and Jonathon Green at 1 p.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. Great lawns start with great soil. Learn about the four steps to growing a beautiful lawn this year.

*The Thrills Spills of Container Gardening by Four Star Greenhouses at 3:30 p.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. Growing plants and flowers in containers is a great way to enjoy a spot of color anywhere. We’ll share lots of ideas and inspiration to add an updated flair to your gardens this year.

*Stop Browsing Deer Rabbits from Destroying your Garden by Julia Hofley at 4 p.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. Learn the best techniques to keep your plants from getting eaten from neighborhood rabbits and deer.

*Natural Approaches to Preventing Animal Insect Damage by Marilyn Cox of I Must Garden at 2:30 p.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. At one time or another, every gardener faces issues with pests. Whether crawling, burrowing, chewing or gnawing, animals and insects can be very frustrating, causing problems not only to the beauty and health of our garden, but to our sanity as well. We don’t have to let pests get the better of us – or our passion for gardening. In this seminar we will explore options to protect your flowers and plants naturally, safely and effectively.

*The Basics of Landscape Design by English Gardens landscape designers at 11:30 a.m. March 28 at the Dearborn Heights location. The difference between a beautiful landscape and an exceptional one is a design. Learn how to create an exceptional landscape with tips from the professionals.

*Organic Vegetable Gardening by Andrew Collins of English Gardens at 2 p.m. March 29 at the Dearborn Heights location. We’ll give you tips for growing vegetables naturally.

For more information, log onto www.EnglishGardens.com or contact the Dearborn Heights location, 22650 Ford Road at Outer Drive, at 313-278-4433.

Source: English Gardens

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Article source: http://www.pressandguide.com/articles/2015/03/19/news/doc5509d5bf30cb0503259192.txt

Garden Tips: Not hard to grow sweet peppers

Local News

Bells of the Desert plans fundraiser March 21

Article source: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2015/03/18/3465884/garden-tips-not-hard-to-grown.html