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Archives for February 17, 2015

Estero considers new developments, but final word will be with new Village …

ESTERO, Fla. – The developers of two proposed communities on either side of Corkscrew Road and Via Coconut Point said they aim to follow the urban vision outlined in a recent high-profile Estero market study.

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Article source: http://www.naplesnews.com/news/local-government/estero-considers-new-developments-but-final-word-will-be-with-new-village-council_92765516

Cooperative effort underway to create master plan for Old Town Pocatello

Old Town master plan

Old Town master plan

Idaho State University public administration graduate students Erica Fredrickson and Craig Borrenpohl are helping with a cooperative effort to devise a master plan for the future of Old Town in Pocatello.



Posted: Sunday, February 15, 2015 4:16 am

Cooperative effort underway to create master plan for Old Town Pocatello

By Michael H. O’Donnell
modonnell@journalnet.com

Idaho State Journal

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2 comments

   POCATELLO — Old Town Pocatello is alive and well and looking forward to a bright future, according to its executive director Stephanie Palagi. To set the vision for that future, a cooperative effort between the Old Town organization, city of Pocatello and the political science department at Idaho State University has begun.

    “The whole idea is to strengthen the downtown area,” Palagi said. “This master plan will guide us moving forward.”

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      Sunday, February 15, 2015 4:16 am.

      The Idaho State Journal invites you to take part in the community conversation. But those who don’t play nice may be uninvited. Don’t post comments that are off topic, defamatory, libelous, obscene, racist, abusive, threatening or an invasion of privacy. We may remove any comment for any reason or no reason. We encourage you to report abuse, but the decision to delete is ours. Commenters have no expectation of privacy and may be held accountable for their comments.

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      Article source: http://www.idahostatejournal.com/members/cooperative-effort-underway-to-create-master-plan-for-old-town/article_27fc1d92-b504-11e4-8bfe-23ddd14e643c.html

      Rezoning approved for Menomonie housing development – Leader

      City of Menomonie

      City of Menomonie



      Posted: Monday, February 16, 2015 11:29 pm
      |


      Updated: 11:32 pm, Mon Feb 16, 2015.

      Rezoning approved for Menomonie housing development

      By Pamela Powers
      Menomonie News Bureau

      Leader-Telegram

      MENOMONIE — The Menomonie City Council voted 6-4 Monday to rezone property on the city’s north side to allow for a multifamily housing development.

      The vote changed the property — north of Cedar Falls and east of Southridge Avenue — from limited multiple and agriculture to limited multiple and full multiple family housing and conservancy property.

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          Monday, February 16, 2015 11:29 pm.

          Updated: 11:32 pm.

          Article source: http://www.leadertelegram.com/news/front_page/article_fd548c56-b665-11e4-b4c3-93825939133e.html

          Gardens Experiencing Early Budding During Warmer Temps

          BUTTE –

          Business is not the only thing affected by unusually warm weather. Some gardens in the Mining City are already starting to bud. Many gardeners know it’s still too early to start planting seeds in their beds, but the warmer weather does have some people out getting their soil plots garden ready.

          Management at Wagner Nursery and Landscaping in Butte says their phone lines have been busier than normal with customers calling in for advice on how to handle their plants and landscaping during this spike in temperature.

          “My crocus, my hyacinths, tulips… Are they going to be okay if it does freeze? I hate to tell you this but there’s not much you can do. You can even throw a blanket over them; it’s not going to do you much good if it does get cold again. So you just got to hope that Mother Nature doesn’t work against you,” said Ruby Anderson, manager at Wagner Nursery and Landscaping Co.

          One option for getting a head start on your gardens while taking advantage of the extra sunshine is to start seeding in your window, but Anderson warns don’t put them outside.

          There is a bud of hope if your buds do freeze off, sometimes when it warms up again they will pop up again later in the season. Planting season in Butte typically begins on June 10.

          Article source: http://www.abcfoxmontana.com/story/28122300/gardens-experiencing-early-budding-during-warmer-temps

          Gardening trends on display — think outdoor showers! Tiny houses! — at the …

          Take your living room and haul it outdoors. That’s the take away message from landscape designers vying in the Spring Portland Home Garden Show‘ Excellence in Landscaping Competition.

          The 14 gardens will showcase the latest trends in outdoor living, from repurposed materials and ornamental grasses to plant material and lighting effects during the run of the show, Feb. 19-22 at the Portland Expo Center.

          This year’s theme for the 68-year-old Portland Home Garden Show is “Hot Summer Nights.” There will be garden supplies, accessories, outdoor art and seminars presented by gardening gurus. There will also be three tiny houses on display to quell curiosity and provide information for those who are more than amused by the idea of living in a space the size of an area rug.

          The Portland Orchid Society will display rare, unique orchids and nurseries will have ornamental and fruit bearing trees and shrubs, perennials, bulbs, grasses, ferns and water plants in the Original Plant Sale.

          For the Excellence in Landscaping Competition, Debbie Brooks, a landscape designer with Creative Garden Spaces paired up with Cornerstone Hardscapes to create a design garden with luxuries usually reserved for indoor spaces.

          “Our customers are becoming more sophisticated in what they are wanting,” says Rick Snyder of Cornerstone Hardscapes. “It is almost like buying a new car. They want what is new and cool and what is better than their neighbors.”

          Hmm. What could be better than the pad next door? Outdoor fire elements and kitchens are still popular but how about adding exterior showers and baths, suggests Brooks.

          “From a landscape designer’s point of view, bringing all of the indoors out is becoming more and more popular,” she says. “Outdoor furnishings are more stylish to appeal to a broader spectrum of clients.”

          Don H. Roberts II of Southwest Landscape agrees. “More clients are spending their money at home on outdoor living, hosting parties, mini ‘vaca.’ Getting the kids outside for an hour a day, staying in shape. Making your landscape part of your home and your healthy lifestyle.”

          Also on the upswing is the use of re-purposed wood and other materials for  different landscape elements. Several of Brooks’ projects in Portland used old barn wood for a patio cover and a shed.

          Container gardens and long swaths of perennials, ornamental grasses and evergreens will surround one of the tiny homes at the show.

          The garden for the Association of Northwest Landscape Designers celebrates clean lines mixed with industrial salvage. It was designed by Patrick Hughes of Wheel and Barrow Landscape Design and Maintenance in Portland and Dana Dokken of Bridge City Arbors.

          Phil Thornburg of Winterbloom and past president of the ANLD, says that the use of permeable concrete for driveways, sidewalks and paths is gaining interest in areas with drainage issues, “aka, the whole Northwest,” he says.

          The granular consistency is designed to allow water to permeate through the concrete and down through the underlying soil instead of pooling on top of the structure, he explains.

          “At the same time, this material is strong enough for vehicles to drive on it and people to walk on it,” adds Dianna Weston, who also works for Winterbloom.

          Sounds easy to maintain. And that interests Drake’s 7 Dees’ clients, says Tim Sellin, who is fielding a lot of requests for lawn-free landscapes.

          “Almost every client we collaborate with wants a ‘low-maintenance’ backyard, and to them that means no mowing,” says Sellin. “On the contrary, keeping up a lawn is one of the more simple of landscape tasks.”

          Still, his design team focuses on painting a landscape portrait with more plants, permeable pathways and natural products. “There’s still room enough for the manufactured landscape products — concrete pavers, retaining wall block — but they harmonize better with nature,” he says.

          Rick McCutcheon of The Wall says his customers, too, are looking for functional, easy-to-maintain designs. McCutcheon, whose business has been erecting taming recycled, concrete retaining walls since 1982, says retaining walls can “tame” once unusable slopes. He has teamed up with Larry Borlin of Borlin Landscape Services.

          View full sizeSteel and garden art trend 

          Christine Ellis of Gregg Ellis Landscape Design foresees that interest in art in the garden will continue to grow. She suggests installing new contemporary glass art near old concrete birdbaths.

          Other trends she has noticed include cracked pots, recycled art and DIY. “Mossy concrete forms the ‘old’ roots to a garden and new splashy art gives it the updated zing,” says Ellis, who is working with Carolyn Gregg, also of Gregg Ellis Landscape Design, and Randy Wooley of Cedarscapes. “Rusty steel and shiny does the same thing.”

          Marina Wynton of Olivine Land says her clients have expressed concern for dwindling pollinators and birds. “More people are aware that their gardens can provide wildlife habitat as well as meet other goals such as entertaining or growing edibles,” says Wynton, who specializing in sustainable landscape design in urban spaces.

          Others participating in the Excellence in Landscaping Competition are the American Rhododendron Society with Red’s Rhodes and Dover Nursery, Autumn Leaf Landscaping, Healing Arts Resource Project (HARP) by Hays Associates, JP Stone Contractors, Linda Meyer Design, New Beginnings Landscape, Northwest Outdoor Living Landscapes and OSU Department of Horticulture.

          At the Portland Home Garden Show, the Association of Northwest Landscape Designers will promote its Garden Tour of eight beautiful and unique gardens in West Portland scheduled for Saturday, June 20.

          — Janet Eastman

          jeastman@oregonian.com
          503-799-8739
          @janeteastman

          Tips to better enjoy home and garden shows

          • Bring snacks to keep your strength up.
          • A backpack or large bag can hold brochures and small items.
          • Comfortable shoes will allow you to see more displays.
          • Tote a camera or smart phone to record ideas you’d like to copy or follow up on.
          • Don’t forget a notepad and pen.

          The Portland Home Garden Show at the Expo, 2060 N. Marine Drive, Portland

          Hours: 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 19 and Friday, Feb. 20, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 22.

          Admission: $10 (kids age 12 and under free; $2 off discount coupon

          For more information: 503-246-8291, www.HomeShowPDX.com

          Article source: http://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/2015/02/portland_home_garden_show_tiny.html

          MASTER GARDENER: Edible landscaping includes veggies, herbs, edible flowers

          Edible landscaping

          Edible landscaping

          Edible landscaping offers interesting options for gardeners.



          Posted: Tuesday, February 17, 2015 5:00 am

          MASTER GARDENER: Edible landscaping includes veggies, herbs, edible flowers

          By Jan Beglinger
          Genesee Master Gardener

          The Daily News Online

          |
          0 comments

          Typically most of us keep our vegetable garden separate from our flower beds.  And if we grow fruit we usually relegate fruit trees to a corner of the yard or have a berry patch.  But what if we intermingled them in the landscape?  Landscaping with plants which are both attractive and produce food has been gaining in popularity over the last few years and is called “edible landscaping.”

          Edible landscapes combine vegetables, herbs, edible flowers, berry bushes, fruit and nut trees with ornamental plants for visually pleasing gardens.  Any garden style can become an edible garden.  Gardens can have just a few edibles or many edible species.  Adding edibles can give you a greater selection of textures, forms and colors than a typical ornamental landscape.  If you have never noticed the colorful fruits and foliage of many edibles are attractive.

          There are many reasons to include edible plants in the landscape.  You will be able to enjoy fresh and flavorful fruits and vegetables at their peak of ripeness.  You will know what, if any, pesticides were used.  You can grow unusual varieties that are not available in grocery stores.  You may even save on your grocery bill.

          Do your research before adding edibles.  Pick plants that are suited to your area and learn how to care for them.  Just like ornamental plants, edibles require a certain amount of maintenance and grow best under certain conditions.  Many fruits and vegetables need at least 6 hours of sunlight a day.  Most also grow best in well-drained soils.  You can reduce some maintenance by planting “the right plant in the right place.”  All plants will require fertilizer and water, as well as monitoring for pest problems.  Use disease resistant plants when available.  Most fruit trees will need some annual pruning.

          In established gardens you can start by inter-planting edibles amongst existing landscape plants.  If you need a new shade tree, consider a tree that will also bear fruit or nuts.  Adding a deciduous shrub?  Try planting a currant bush, blueberry or hazelnut.  Add in edible flowers such as nasturtium, daylily, borage, violets and calendula.  (Be sure to positively identify flowers and confirm they are not poisonous prior to eating.)  Some perennial herbs, such as oregano, can double as ground covers plus attract pollinators to your garden.  Replace bedding annuals with leafy vegetables such as kale, lettuce or Swiss chard.

          One thing to keep in mind when designing an edible landscape is the seasonal nature of many fruits and vegetables.  Plus the occasional times when there may be bare areas or reduced color due to transplanting, harvesting or soil cultivation.

          When planting fruit trees remember that some types require at least two trees of different varieties in order to bear fruit.  If you do not have room for two trees, look for self-pollinating varieties or maybe your neighbor has a suitable cultivar within a few hundred feet.  Pick the right tree for the proper location.  Nut trees, such as walnuts, grow to 50 feet or more at maturity, while dwarf apples may only reach 10 feet tall.  Fruit and nut trees are usually available in various sizes, so look for the size that will work well in your space.  Some dwarf trees even adapt well to containers.  To extend your season plant different varieties that bear early, mid and late season, that way not all of your fruit will ripen at one time.

          There are many underutilized native and wild trees that make great edible landscape plants, so do not limit your selection to the more commonly available fruits and nuts.  Serviceberry, dogwood, and pawpaw are native trees that are productive and easy to grow.  Does the tree you are considering typically drops lots of fruit or nuts?  Plant these trees away from decks, patios, driveways and sitting areas so you won’t have dropped fruits staining items, getting underfoot or attracting unwanted guests.

          Look for vegetables that have colorful foliage all season long.  Edge a garden path with herbs and vegetables for fragrance, color and a delicious harvest all summer.  Use lettuce to edge shaded borders or kale in sunny areas.  Create a fragrant border of colorful and flavorful basils.

          Edible landscaping offers an alternative to conventional residential landscapes that are designed only for ornamental purposes.  Edible landscapes can be just as attractive, yet produce fruits and vegetables for home use.  The possibilities for edible landscaping are endless.  By incorporating edible plants into your home landscape, you can develop a productive landscape that will yield produce to meet the needs of your family throughout the growing season.

          Resources for this article include:  Ohio State University, University of Florida, Purdue University, National Gardening Association and Rosalind Creasy – Edible Landscaping.

          Need more gardening information?  Contact the Cornell Cooperative Extension Genesee County Master Gardeners for assistance.  They may be reached by calling 585-343-3040, ext. 127, Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. until noon; or stop in at our office at 420 East Main St., Batavia.  They may also be contacted via e-mail at: geneseemg@hotmail.com.  Visit our CCE web site at genesee.cce.cornell.edu or like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/CCEofGenesee.  “CCE of Genesee County is an employer and educator recognized for valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities and provides equal program and employment opportunities.”

          Join the Genesee County Master Gardeners for a new garden series called “Garden Talk.”  We plan to hold a variety of garden related topics on the first Tuesday of the month from 12:15 to 12:45 p.m.  Bring your lunch to the CCE office (420 E. Main St, Batavia) and think spring.  The March 3 topic will be “New Plants for 2015.”  We will take a look at a sampling of the new annuals, perennials, vegetables shrubs that will be hitting the market this year.  This program is free and open to the public.  Registration is not required.  Contact Brandie at 585-343-3040 x 101 for more information.


          on

          Tuesday, February 17, 2015 5:00 am.

          Article source: http://www.thedailynewsonline.com/lifestyles/article_2aaffeec-b666-11e4-a1ec-8b0923dec23d.html

          Gardening 101: 4 tips on saving water

          With spring just around the corner — and spring-like weather already here — we asked Green Acres of Sacramento to share some tips on how to save water on your garden and landscaping.

          No. 1: Mulch well.

          Mulching is one of the best things gardeners can do. A layer of mulch reduces evaporation, which is imperative during period of drought. The mulch also keeps temperatures cooler in the summer, providing a healthy environment for roots.

          Rule to remember: Keep mulch about 6-12 inches away from tree bases and apply 2-4 inches of mulch on top of planted areas.

          2. Assess your irrigation situation

          Drip irrigation will deliver water to exactly where it’s needed and vastly reduce on water waste. If you use sprinklers that provide too much water, there’s an easy fix: Simply switch them out with water-saving heads (such as MP Rotators).

          Remember, in most cases, all you need to do is switch out the nozzle.

          You can also use an irrigation clock to help cut back on water waste.

          Rule to remember: Be sure to use a nozzle with a shut-off valve to save water.

          3. Go organic

          Organic fertilizers are slow release and offer sustained nutrients to plants, unlike synthetics. Synthetics encourage quicker, water-intensive growth.

          4. Plant responsibly

          When planting and planning your garden, consider the mature height and width of your plants. It is important to select the proper number of plants for your space in order to reduce water use.

          Rule to remember: Dig six inches into the soil and use a hand towel to gauge the soil’s moisture. If the soil is moist at the level, there’s no need to water.

          Article source: http://www.kcra.com/news/local-news/news-sacramento/gardening-101-4-tips-on-saving-water/31299210

          Pinspiration – February garden tips




          You may already have spring fever, and we have some tips on what you can do now to get your garden ready.



          Do you have spring fever? If you don’t now, you probably will by the end of this frigid, messy week of winter.

          The House and Garden Show was this past weekend, and to say the garden displays were inspirational is an understatement.

          While we can’t all create a massive outdoor oasis, we can start thinking spring gardening.

          We talked to Lisa from Stanley’s Greenhouse and she said now is the time to start clearing and prepping your gardens. Get rid of old, dead plants and leaves. You can also go ahead and mulch and prepare the soil.

          Vegetable gardens can be started soon indoors. With small planters, seeds and good soil, you can get the plants started and transplant them outside when the warmer months approach.

          Lisa said, “They can do some indoor germination, but some things they would want to direct sow later on when the soil is warm.”

          I also love the colors that come with spring flowers. It’s not too late to get bulbs in the ground. These perennials, or plants that come back every year, are easy ways to add color.

          Lisa says bulbs you plant in the fall are the first to come up. (I even have some peeking up in the ground already.) Any bulbs that you plant now will be late bloomers, and will come up in the summer.

          She said, “You might not want to be putting them in the ground until we just get a little bit warmer. So probably about a month, but they’re coming into the store now, so they can start to shop it. Just leave them cool in a dry place until they get ready to plant.”

          To see these projects and more, click on the “Pinspiration” board on Heather’s Pinterest page, http://www.pinterest.com/wvltheather, or Erin Barnett’s Pinterest page at http://www.pinterest.com/wvlterinbarnett.

          Follow us on Pinterest as we start planning our flower and vegetable gardens!

          Article source: http://www.local8now.com/home/headlines/Pinspiration---February-garden-tips-292065951.html

          Bridgewater, Raritan, Somerville residents plant gardens for clean water

          The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program has partnered with the New Jersey Water Supply Authority Watershed Protection Program to offer rebates to homeowners that build rain gardens (shown here). (courtesy photo) 

          The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program has partnered with the New Jersey Water Supply Authority Watershed Protection Program to offer rebates to homeowners that build rain gardens. Since 2013, more than 60 area residents have attended these workshops, and more than 10 rain gardens were installed in 2014 through this rebate program.

          The Rain Garden Rebate Program is being offered again for 2015.

          This program is open to residents of Bridgewater, Raritan and Somerville to learn the basics of rain garden installation and design a rain garden for your home. At the workshop, attendees will be offered the opportunity to sign up for free rain garden design sessions with Rutgers landscape professionals. With detailed guidance in hand, rebates of up to $450 may be awarded to participating residents who install a rain garden on their property.

          Gardens must be created from an approved design to qualify for the rebate. Residents, businesses, schools, and community spaces are all eligible.

          Workshops will be held on Thursday, March 12, 6-8 p.m. and Saturday, March 14, 10 a.m. to noon at the Duke Farms Coach Barn, Dukes Parkway East, Hillsborough.

          To register, contact Michelle at mrollman@raritanbasin.org or 908-730-0270, ext. 223, or visit www.raritanbasin.org.

          For program information, visit: http://www.water.rutgers.edu/Projects/RGRebate/RGRebate.html

          Article source: http://www.nj.com/messenger-gazette/index.ssf/2015/02/bridgewater_raritan_somerville_residents_plant_gardens_for_clean_water.html