Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Archives for February 16, 2015

Optimism reigns at New Jersey Spring Home Show

SECAUCUS – Larry and Lori Wilson recently bought a home in New Milford, so they decided to take the 25-minute drive down to the Meadowlands Exposition Center on Sunday morning to get some ideas on how to refurbish it.

With the economy improving and a little extra cash to spend than they had a few years ago, the Wilsons wanted to wander up and down the isles at the New Jersey Spring Home Show to see what the different vendors might have to offer. Specifically, they wanted to look at some landscaping ideas.

“When you have a home, you are always looking for things to fix it up,” Larry Wilson said. “Money isn’t as tight as it was a few years ago when everything was up in the air. We’re working on a lot of different things now.”

Many people seemed to be doing the same thing as the Wilsons on Sunday morning, and from the exposition attendees to the nearly 100 businesses trying to drum up clients at the event, everyone was upbeat.

Preston Taylor, a senior consultant at Totowa-based security system company Beacon Protection, was manning a table near the entrance of the home show.

Taylor said over the three-day expo he was able to secure approximately 20 new clients, which he believes is an indication that home-owning consumers might be willing to spend money they might not have had a few years ago.

“We’re absolutely selling more,” Taylor said. “With gas prices dropping and everything like that, I think people are a little more optimistic.”

According to recent economic indicators, that optimism is warranted. The Architecture Billing Index, a monthly survey conducted by the American Institute of Architects, tracks clients that have been billed by firms and is generally used to show growth or decline in construction activity. In it’s most recent report released in January, the institute posted a mark of 52.2 for December, up from a mark of 50.9 in November. Any number above 50 is considered billing growth.

Hawthorne residents Dino and Lizbeth Callegar also own single- and two-family homes in Paterson and Haledon and came to the expo on Sunday to take a look at different ideas of how to fix them up.

Dino Callegar said there was “no question” he was more willing to spend the extra money to fix up the homes now that the economy seems to be slowly improving. On Sunday they were looking at the security systems at Beacon Protection, but planned on checking out windows as well.

“We’re a lot more free to make decisions on things we might not have been able to over the last couple of years,” Callegar said.

Other businesses at the home expo also said they believe consumers are becoming more optimistic – which in turn leads to more revenue for them.

Dino Torluccio, the owner of D Torluccio Landscaping in West Caldwell, said they were able to double the amount of leads they got at last year’s home expo at the convention center.

John Galka, who was working at the D Torluccio Landscaping display, said he felt people were realizing that a home is a main asset – and therefore are beginning to spend on them now that the economy has slowly improved.

“Your 401(k) could disappear on the stock market, but your house will always be there,” Galka said. “I think people are realizing you can invest in your home for the long term.”

Some of those in attendance did not come with any specific home improvement project in mind, but as Galka said, were looking for possible solutions in the long-term future.

Jaki Raider, an Oradell resident who was walking up and down the aisles with her daughter Erinn, said she was collecting brochures and contact information from a variety of different vendors to keep on hand should any project arise in the future.

“Sometimes you see something here that you didn’t even know you needed done at your home,” Raider said. “It’s good to have a roster of cards rather than having to start from scratch. I’ve been living at my home for 22 years and we’d like to re-do our kitchen. Maybe not this year, but now we’ll have options.”

Email: wyrich@northjersey.com Twitter: @AndrewWyrich

 

Article source: http://www.northjersey.com/news/optimism-reigns-at-new-jersey-spring-home-show-1.1272045

Rail project’s Tech Center aims to fit surroundings

0) { %

0) { %

0) { %

Article source: http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/metro-detroit/2015/02/15/rail-projects-tech-center-aims-fit-surroundings/23461455/

Improving economy a boost for New Jersey Spring Home Show

SECAUCUS – Larry and Lori Wilson recently bought a home in New Milford, so they decided to take the 25-minute drive down to the Meadowlands Exposition Center on Sunday morning to get some ideas on how to refurbish it.

With the economy improving and a little extra cash to spend than they had a few years ago, the Wilsons wanted to wander up and down the isles at the New Jersey Spring Home Show to see what the different vendors might have to offer. Specifically, they wanted to look at some landscaping ideas.

“When you have a home, you are always looking for things to fix it up,” Larry Wilson said. “Money isn’t as tight as it was a few years ago when everything was up in the air. We’re working on a lot of different things now.”

Many people seemed to be doing the same thing as the Wilsons on Sunday morning, and from the exposition attendees to the nearly 100 businesses trying to drum up clients at the event, everyone was upbeat.

Preston Taylor, a senior consultant at Totowa-based security system company Beacon Protection, was manning a table near the entrance of the home show.

Taylor said over the three-day expo he was able to secure approximately 20 new clients, which he believes is an indication that home-owning consumers might be willing to spend money they might not have had a few years ago.

“We’re absolutely selling more,” Taylor said. “With gas prices dropping and everything like that, I think people are a little more optimistic.”

According to recent economic indicators, that optimism is warranted. The Architecture Billing Index, a monthly survey conducted by the American Institute of Architects, tracks clients that have been billed by firms and is generally used to show growth or decline in construction activity. In it’s most recent report released in January, the institute posted a mark of 52.2 for December, up from a mark of 50.9 in November. Any number above 50 is considered billing growth.

Hawthorne residents Dino and Lizbeth Callegar also own single- and two-family homes in Paterson and Haledon and came to the expo on Sunday to take a look at different ideas of how to fix them up.

Dino Callegar said there was “no question” he was more willing to spend the extra money to fix up the homes now that the economy seems to be slowly improving. On Sunday they were looking at the security systems at Beacon Protection, but planned on checking out windows as well.

“We’re a lot more free to make decisions on things we might not have been able to over the last couple of years,” Callegar said.

Other businesses at the home expo also said they believe consumers are becoming more optimistic – which in turn leads to more revenue for them.

Dino Torluccio, the owner of D Torluccio Landscaping in West Caldwell, said they were able to double the amount of leads they got at last year’s home expo at the convention center.

John Galka, who was working at the D Torluccio Landscaping display, said he felt people were realizing that a home is a main asset – and therefore are beginning to spend on them now that the economy has slowly improved.

“Your 401(k) could disappear on the stock market, but your house will always be there,” Galka said. “I think people are realizing you can invest in your home for the long term.”

Some of those in attendance did not come with any specific home improvement project in mind, but as Galka said, were looking for possible solutions in the long-term future.

Jaki Raider, an Oradell resident who was walking up and down the aisles with her daughter Erinn, said she was collecting brochures and contact information from a variety of different vendors to keep on hand should any project arise in the future.

“Sometimes you see something here that you didn’t even know you needed done at your home,” Raider said. “It’s good to have a roster of cards rather than having to start from scratch. I’ve been living at my home for 22 years and we’d like to re-do our kitchen. Maybe not this year, but now we’ll have options.”

Email: wyrich@northjersey.com Twitter: @AndrewWyrich

 

Article source: http://www.northjersey.com/news/improving-economy-a-boost-for-new-jersey-spring-home-show-1.1272045

Town Square | Construction to begin on condos and rentals in Arlington


(Courtesy of LCOR)

LCOR, a real estate company specializing in property development, investment and management, received final site approval from the Arlington County Board for The Altaire, a two-tower project at 400 Army Navy Dr. in Arlington.

Construction will begin in mid-2015 and the project is expected to be complete by the second quarter of 2018 with 150 condo units in the first tower and 300 rental units in the second tower. Sited on 1.77 acres at the border of Crystal City and Pentagon City, the 20-story towers will be certified LEED Gold and include high tech, energy efficient systems. The towers will have floor-to-ceiling glass facades with balconies on many of the units.

Amenities to be shared by both buildings include a landscaped courtyard with a swimming pool and fire pits, a fitness center, a club room and a lounge. Each tower will have a roof-top terrace with unobstructed views of Washington’s monuments, the Potomac River, the White House and the Capitol. The reception area for both towers will have 24-hour security and concierge services.

Residents can walk to the Crystal City and Pentagon Metro stations, a new Whole Foods store and dozens of restaurants, hotels and shops.

For more information, go to www.thealtaire.com.

Capital Remodel + Garden Show coming to Dulles Expo Center

Whether your passion is a great garden or a DIY remodeling project, you can find tips and inspiration at the Capital Remodel + Garden Show Feb. 27 to March 1 at the Dulles Expo Center in Chantilly.

More than 375 companies will be on hand to showcase their products and services, including remodeling, home improvement, gardening, landscaping and home décor. There will be more than 3,000 square feet of landscaped gardens to give you ideas on how to spruce up your exterior spaces.

Jeff Devlin, host of HGTV’s “I Hate My Bath” and “Ellen’s Design Challenge” as well as DIY’s “Good, Better … Best” will discuss projects from his TV shows and answer questions.

In addition, Chris Lambton, host of DIY’s “Yard Crashers” and “Going Yard” will offer tips on landscaping, garden planning and maintenance. WTOP’s garden editor Mike McGrath will talk about tomatoes and lawns.

For more information and tickets, go to www.CapitalRemodelandGarden.com. Tickets for adults are $7 online and $10 at the door.


(Courtesy of EYA)

Sales to begin at luxury townhouses in Bethesda

Grosvenor Heights, a cluster of 99 luxury townhouses set on 33 acres in Bethesda, is now under construction.

More than 60 percent of the land at the EYA project will be open space, and homeowners will have views of the surrounding woodlands. Residents can walk to Rock Creek Park and Fleming Park and the Trolley Trails Shops at Wildwood. The Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro station is a 15-minute walk and Interstates 270 and 695 are within a two-minute drive.

The three-level townhouses, each with an elevator, are available in three models priced from $1.1 million to $1.6 million. The townhouses will have contemporary-style architecture with brick and cedar siding, floor-to-ceiling windows and metal awnings and canopies to provide shade for the balconies and terraces.

The 2,523- to 3,433-square-foot residences have three or four bedrooms, a two-car garage, front and rear balconies and an open floor plan. A private rooftop terrace will cover the entirety of each townhouse; buyers can add an outdoor kitchen and gas fireplace to the terrace.

Inside, the residences have gas fireplaces and upgraded appliances and will be built to meet LEED for Homes certification standards.

The sales center will open Saturday at 5430 Grosvenor Lane in Bethesda. For more information, go to www.eya.com/grosvenor.

Free event seeks to equip first-time home buyers

The Angelika Film Center in the Mosaic District in Fairfax will be the site of free first-time home buyer event, “How to Rock Being a First Time Home Buyer,” on Wednesday, Feb. 25.

A panel of experts, including Kristina O’Neill, a senior loan officer with George Mason Mortgage, will provide information about how to get started searching for a home. Topics to be covered include:

• Renting vs. owning

• Understanding the mortgage process

• Home inspections and home warranties

• The steps from home search to settlement

Hors d’oeuvres and beverages will be served and participants will be able to ask questions of the panelists.

The event, organized by real estate agent Traci Oliver, will take place from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at 2911 District Ave., Fairfax.

Registration is required for this free event. To register, go to www.TraciSellsVirginia.com, e-mail Oliver at TraciSellsVirginia@gmail.com or call 703-505-7614.

Michele Lerner is a freelance writer. To pass on a tip or news item, contact us at realestate@washpost.com and put “Town Square” in the subject line.

Article source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/where-we-live/wp/2015/02/16/town-square-construction-to-begin-on-condos-and-rentals-in-arlington/

Garden Expo has people thinking spring despite cold temps

Columbia County Sheriff’s officials say there’s been a suspicious inmate death at the Columbia Correctional Institution.

Inmate is 40-year-old male.

Article source: http://www.wkow.com/story/28115748/2015/02/15/garden-expo-has-people-thinking-spring-despite-cold-temps

UCLA, heirs wrangle over fate of a tranquil Japanese garden

Visitor Michael Rich

Decades ago, UCLA opened the garden to visitors on a limited basis, and thousands made the necessary reservations to stroll the steep pathways. In May 2011, the university closed the property to the public and months later announced plans to auction the two acres containing the benefactors’ Georgian Colonial house on Siena Way and the garden on Bellagio Road.

The heirs successfully sued to temporarily halt the sale and now seek to permanently prevent the regents from destroying the garden or selling it without conditions that would guarantee its preservation.

Despite four mediation sessions, the most recent in November, the two sides have failed to come to terms. But, with the case expected to go to trial this summer in Los Angeles County Superior Court in Santa Monica, some of those involved say the family members and the university could yet resolve their differences.

“A settlement is always on the table,” said Craig de Recat, an attorney for the Regents of the University of California, which owns UCLA and pays its bills.

lRelated In urban farming, a different taste of L.A.
CALIFORNIAIn urban farming, a different taste of L.A.See all related

Walter W. Moore, an attorney for the heirs, agrees that a settlement is possible. He added that the university runs the risk of alienating potential contributors by reneging on a written promise.

“Who’s going to keep contributing to higher education,” he said, “if you’re worried that when you’re six feet under the promise will be broken?”

Indeed, the situation is a reminder that universities must tread carefully, said Leslie Lenkowsky, a professor of philanthropy at Indiana University.

“There are limited circumstances under which universities can transfer gifts without discouraging future donations,” he said. “There is an integrity issue.”

According to the heirs’ amended complaint, filed in October, the regents’ petition to the Alameda County court was intended to make the court believe that “circumstances not known or anticipated” had made caring for the garden impracticable when, in fact, UCLA was well aware of the parking shortage and the fact that long-term maintenance would require millions of dollars.

The garden was commissioned in 1959 by oilman Gordon Guiberson and his wife, Verabelle. Architect Nagao Sakurai of Tokyo (known for designing the Japanese government’s Imperial Japanese Gardens at the Golden Gate International Exposition in San Francisco and the World’s Fair in New York in 1939) and garden designer Kazuo Nakamura of Kyoto created the setting, with some structures built in Japan and reassembled at the site. The garden was completed in 1961 but underwent a significant restoration in 1969 after heavy rains eroded the hillside.

Over the years, visitors have walked amid the garden’s bamboo, Japanese black pines and blooming magnolia and camellia trees, admiring streams, a waterfall, a koi pond, a teahouse and weathered stone sculptures dating back centuries.

One possible outcome that could satisfy the concerns of all would be to sell the garden to a buyer who would agree to maintain it, Lenkowsky said.

“I am optimistic that we will ultimately reach a settlement between now and the trial date in July,” said Jim Caldwell, one of Hannah Carter’s five children, who lives in Woodside in the Bay Area. “Alumni and donors want to believe in the university.”

martha.groves@latimes.com
Twitter: @MarthaGroves

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-ucla-japanese-garden-20150216-story.html

Wilson County gardeners ready for Nashville Lawn and Garden Show

Online Contact Form
615-444-3952
615-444-1358 (fax)
402 N. Cumberland St.
Lebanon, TN 37087

Article source: http://www.lebanondemocrat.com/article/living/570951

Jackson Fencing competition will see winning Society of Garden Designers entry …


Having trouble signing in?

Contact Customer Support at

hwsupport@haymarket.com
or call 020 8267 8121, or refer to our answers to frequently asked questions.

Article source: http://www.hortweek.com/jackson-fencing-competition-will-winning-society-garden-designers-entry-backed-hampton-court/landscape/article/1333669