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Archives for February 14, 2015

Helping birds survive winter in your backyard

Winter is a perfect time to do something for the birds. And maybe for yourself, too.

“One of the greatest benefits of feeding birds is that the homeowner can easily see what birds are using their land, and develop a greater appreciation of birds,” says Michael Ward, an assistant professor in the department of natural resources and environmental sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

So with that in mind, here are a few ideas to help birds withstand the winter weather — and maybe even provide some education and entertainment for the kids.

Hold off with the pruners. If you haven’t already cut back all your dead vegetation from last summer — don’t. According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, those plants provide shelter for birds. Another idea is to create a brush pile to protect them. You can always tidy things up later — that’s why they call it “spring cleaning.”

Looking ahead, Ward says landscaping a yard with native bushes and shrubs can make it a welcoming habitat for wintering birds. So plan next spring’s planting accordingly.

Repurpose your Christmas tree. Speaking of shelter, your Christmas tree can do double-duty till spring, providing protection as well as a food source. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension suggests placing the tree — stripped of decorations, lights and tinsel — on the south or east side of the house to afford cover from north and west winds.

To secure it, put the stump in a hole or a bucket of wet sand, and tie a rope from the top to a building or nearby tree. Then redecorate the tree, but with strings of popcorn, cranberries or raisins. The UNL Extension also says to add apples, oranges, leftover breads and pine cones covered with peanut butter and then dipped in birdseed. For best results, push the edible ornaments well into the tree.

Coming home to roost. The Cornell Lab also suggests roost boxes. Birds will seek shelter in nesting boxes in the winter, resulting in overcrowded conditions (they’re used as nests only in spring and summer). Besides, these boxes are for nesting, not roosting. But a roost box can protect any birds that nest in boxes: bluebirds, chickadees, titmice, nuthatches and small woodpeckers.

A good roost box keeps the birds’ body heat contained and has interior perches, and can be placed on a metal pole or wooden post. They’re available in stores, or you can make your own. The Washington Department of Fish Wildlife offers roost box-building instructions on its website: wdfw.wa.gov/living/projects.

Kid-friendly adventures. Encourage the kids’ involvement in setting up a bird feeder and choosing the best food — good information on seed choices is available at allaboutbirds.org. Get a reliable field guide (the Sibley field guides offer versions for different geographical locations) or free app to identify the birds that use the feeder. Have the kids keep a journal and report their findings to feederwatch.org or ebird.org.

Avian superfoods. High-fat, high-energy foods such as suet and sunflower seeds are preferable in winter. On a cold night, chickadees lose 25 percent of their body weight. And be consistent in your feeding, putting out seeds or suet (or seed-studded suet balls) regularly. If the birds come to rely on you for a constant supply of food, and you close up shop when a storm hits, they might not survive. Once they know food is always available, they’ll keep coming back — not only in winter but year-round.

Water is key. Just as birds need food, they also need water during the coldest days. Spring for a birdbath heater to keep water from freezing. There are many models to choose from; check your local independent garden center or big box store. And be sure to keep the bird bath clean.

Four weeks for 99 cents of unlimited digital access to The Seattle Times. Try it now!

Article source: http://seattletimes.com/html/homesrealestate/2025678503_hrebirdsxml.html

Helping birds survive winter in your backyard

Winter is a perfect time to do something for the birds. And maybe for yourself, too.

“One of the greatest benefits of feeding birds is that the homeowner can easily see what birds are using their land, and develop a greater appreciation of birds,” says Michael Ward, an assistant professor in the department of natural resources and environmental sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

So with that in mind, here are a few ideas to help birds withstand the winter weather — and maybe even provide some education and entertainment for the kids.

Hold off with the pruners. If you haven’t already cut back all your dead vegetation from last summer — don’t. According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, those plants provide shelter for birds. Another idea is to create a brush pile to protect them. You can always tidy things up later — that’s why they call it “spring cleaning.”

Looking ahead, Ward says landscaping a yard with native bushes and shrubs can make it a welcoming habitat for wintering birds. So plan next spring’s planting accordingly.

Repurpose your Christmas tree. Speaking of shelter, your Christmas tree can do double-duty till spring, providing protection as well as a food source. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension suggests placing the tree — stripped of decorations, lights and tinsel — on the south or east side of the house to afford cover from north and west winds.

To secure it, put the stump in a hole or a bucket of wet sand, and tie a rope from the top to a building or nearby tree. Then redecorate the tree, but with strings of popcorn, cranberries or raisins. The UNL Extension also says to add apples, oranges, leftover breads and pine cones covered with peanut butter and then dipped in birdseed. For best results, push the edible ornaments well into the tree.

Coming home to roost. The Cornell Lab also suggests roost boxes. Birds will seek shelter in nesting boxes in the winter, resulting in overcrowded conditions (they’re used as nests only in spring and summer). Besides, these boxes are for nesting, not roosting. But a roost box can protect any birds that nest in boxes: bluebirds, chickadees, titmice, nuthatches and small woodpeckers.

A good roost box keeps the birds’ body heat contained and has interior perches, and can be placed on a metal pole or wooden post. They’re available in stores, or you can make your own. The Washington Department of Fish Wildlife offers roost box-building instructions on its website: wdfw.wa.gov/living/projects.

Kid-friendly adventures. Encourage the kids’ involvement in setting up a bird feeder and choosing the best food — good information on seed choices is available at allaboutbirds.org. Get a reliable field guide (the Sibley field guides offer versions for different geographical locations) or free app to identify the birds that use the feeder. Have the kids keep a journal and report their findings to feederwatch.org or ebird.org.

Avian superfoods. High-fat, high-energy foods such as suet and sunflower seeds are preferable in winter. On a cold night, chickadees lose 25 percent of their body weight. And be consistent in your feeding, putting out seeds or suet (or seed-studded suet balls) regularly. If the birds come to rely on you for a constant supply of food, and you close up shop when a storm hits, they might not survive. Once they know food is always available, they’ll keep coming back — not only in winter but year-round.

Water is key. Just as birds need food, they also need water during the coldest days. Spring for a birdbath heater to keep water from freezing. There are many models to choose from; check your local independent garden center or big box store. And be sure to keep the bird bath clean.

Four weeks for 99 cents of unlimited digital access to The Seattle Times. Try it now!

Article source: http://seattletimes.com/html/homesrealestate/2025678503_hrebirdsxml.html

Coshocton is Blooming to focus on community

The city of Coshocton is taking a year off from the America in Bloom competition and will evaluate its influence on the community.

Coshocton Municipal Judge Tim France, chairman of local steering committee, Coshocton is Blooming, said the organization wants to take time to see how efforts have affected Coshocton and where it could take the city in the future.

France said they want to continue to encourage the community in beautification projects and to maintain home gardens. Coshocton is Blooming will keep up with fundraising, awareness and recognition of local volunteers and gardens.

France said they might invite experts from the surrounding area to judge a local contest.

Local representatives would probably still attend America in Bloom’s annual symposium for ideas. Coshocton is Blooming also will maintain planters and hanging baskets throughout the city.

This year’s floral theme is “Grape Expectations,” focusing on traditional grape colors such as green and purple.

Coshocton joined America in Bloom in 2010 as a catalyst toward beautification and instilling local pride. France said the committee felt it was now time to take lessons learned and focus it on Coshocton and its residents, not worry about impressing two judges.

“It’s kind of like having company come to your house, ‘Oh, we better pick up and make it look as good as we can,’ ” France said. “We want to get the community more involved and not just focus on the two people coming in and giving them our attention. We want to give our attention to the community.”

Coshocton scored four blooms out of five in 2014 while also earning a special mention for heritage preservation. Cities are judged on overall impression, environmental awareness, heritage preservation, urban forestry, landscaped areas and floral displays.

In previous years, Coshocton has ranked high in heritage preservation, floral displays and landscaping. It has not done well concerning environmental awareness, urban forestry and overall impression.

The urban forestry score was helped this year by the city council passing a tree ordinance and the creation of a catalog of city trees and conditions.

France said the other two categories have been hurt by the presence of litter, graffiti and weeds along streets and sidewalks.

Making the city look good entices people to stay and others to move in, which was the foundation of Coshocton joining America in Bloom in the first place.

llhayhur@coshoctontribune.com

740-295-3417

Twitter: @llhayhurst

Learn More

For more information about Coshocton is Blooming, people can attend its next meeting at noon Feb. 20 at Clary Gardens in the tan house.

Article source: http://www.coshoctontribune.com/story/news/local/2015/02/14/coshocton-blooming-focus-community/23406365/

Coshocton is Blooming to focus on community

The city of Coshocton is taking a year off from the America in Bloom competition and will evaluate its influence on the community.

Coshocton Municipal Judge Tim France, chairman of local steering committee, Coshocton is Blooming, said the organization wants to take time to see how efforts have affected Coshocton and where it could take the city in the future.

France said they want to continue to encourage the community in beautification projects and to maintain home gardens. Coshocton is Blooming will keep up with fundraising, awareness and recognition of local volunteers and gardens.

France said they might invite experts from the surrounding area to judge a local contest.

Local representatives would probably still attend America in Bloom’s annual symposium for ideas. Coshocton is Blooming also will maintain planters and hanging baskets throughout the city.

This year’s floral theme is “Grape Expectations,” focusing on traditional grape colors such as green and purple.

Coshocton joined America in Bloom in 2010 as a catalyst toward beautification and instilling local pride. France said the committee felt it was now time to take lessons learned and focus it on Coshocton and its residents, not worry about impressing two judges.

“It’s kind of like having company come to your house, ‘Oh, we better pick up and make it look as good as we can,’ ” France said. “We want to get the community more involved and not just focus on the two people coming in and giving them our attention. We want to give our attention to the community.”

Coshocton scored four blooms out of five in 2014 while also earning a special mention for heritage preservation. Cities are judged on overall impression, environmental awareness, heritage preservation, urban forestry, landscaped areas and floral displays.

In previous years, Coshocton has ranked high in heritage preservation, floral displays and landscaping. It has not done well concerning environmental awareness, urban forestry and overall impression.

The urban forestry score was helped this year by the city council passing a tree ordinance and the creation of a catalog of city trees and conditions.

France said the other two categories have been hurt by the presence of litter, graffiti and weeds along streets and sidewalks.

Making the city look good entices people to stay and others to move in, which was the foundation of Coshocton joining America in Bloom in the first place.

llhayhur@coshoctontribune.com

740-295-3417

Twitter: @llhayhurst

Learn More

For more information about Coshocton is Blooming, people can attend its next meeting at noon Feb. 20 at Clary Gardens in the tan house.

Article source: http://www.coshoctontribune.com/story/news/local/2015/02/14/coshocton-blooming-focus-community/23406365/

Legislative agenda could boost economy and mean real reforms for Michigan …

The state House GOP released a legislative agenda last week that prioritizes Michigan’s economy and entrepreneurial business climate. It’s a good list from the new batch of lawmakers. If they remain committed to it and can persuade colleagues across the aisle, it could mean real reform in a number of important areas.

Social issues are pleasantly absent from the agenda. That’s somewhat surprising, given the number of social conservatives elected in the fall.

Michigan has come a long way since the economic lows of 2008. But more must be done to increase the competitive advantage of the state and its residents — all the more important as economies of other Great Lakes states such as Wisconsin and Ohio are rapidly rebounding.

In terms of real job creation, repealing Michigan’s prevailing wage law is a good place to start.

This law, which requires government construction jobs to match union wages and benefits, regardless of contractor, pushes project costs artificially high. Those needless costs waste about $224 million in taxpayer dollars annually, according to a study from the Anderson Economic Group.

The legislators also want to improve Michigan’s climate for entrepreneurs, and streamline or remove unnecessary regulatory hurdles for individuals and businesses.

For instance, the state should strip administrative barriers to fully enacting the Michigan Invests Locally Exemption Act, which allows small businesses to obtain financial capital from crowdsourcing and other non-traditional means.

Although the GOP doesn’t specifically outline how it will help innovative technology-based businesses like Uber and Lyft, the House GOP is right to note it will strive to remove barriers for the companies and their employees. These services deserve a stable framework in which to operate and provide much-needed transportation options for residents throughout the state.

Deregulating occupational licensure is another good priority. No one should need a license to braid or cut hair, provide landscaping or make interior design recommendations, or any number of other activities for which the state currently requires a license. Removing these barriers should boost job growth.

The GOP also identified several areas for reform in education, including shifting all new teachers to enroll in a 401(k) retirement system. It’s currently optional, so most teachers opt for the more traditional pension plan. With the House focused on this, Michigan’s largest unfunded liability might get the reform it needs.

The lawmakers also identified reforms in sentencing and corrections policies as key, along with civil asset forfeiture reform. Michigan’s criminal justice system is bloated and often unequal in its treatment. Establishing more equitable and efficient guidelines will help.

And on energy, a key priority will be allowing utilities to use out-of-state renewable energy to meet Michigan’s renewable mandate. Currently, the companies lose money trying to meet these goals, and reforming this law would be a simple fix.

It’s an ambitious list, but Michigan will be better off if these ideas are pursued.

Article source: http://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/editorials/2015/02/13/edit-michigan-house-smart-agenda/23368645/

Legislative agenda could boost economy and mean real reforms for Michigan …

The state House GOP released a legislative agenda last week that prioritizes Michigan’s economy and entrepreneurial business climate. It’s a good list from the new batch of lawmakers. If they remain committed to it and can persuade colleagues across the aisle, it could mean real reform in a number of important areas.

Social issues are pleasantly absent from the agenda. That’s somewhat surprising, given the number of social conservatives elected in the fall.

Michigan has come a long way since the economic lows of 2008. But more must be done to increase the competitive advantage of the state and its residents — all the more important as economies of other Great Lakes states such as Wisconsin and Ohio are rapidly rebounding.

In terms of real job creation, repealing Michigan’s prevailing wage law is a good place to start.

This law, which requires government construction jobs to match union wages and benefits, regardless of contractor, pushes project costs artificially high. Those needless costs waste about $224 million in taxpayer dollars annually, according to a study from the Anderson Economic Group.

The legislators also want to improve Michigan’s climate for entrepreneurs, and streamline or remove unnecessary regulatory hurdles for individuals and businesses.

For instance, the state should strip administrative barriers to fully enacting the Michigan Invests Locally Exemption Act, which allows small businesses to obtain financial capital from crowdsourcing and other non-traditional means.

Although the GOP doesn’t specifically outline how it will help innovative technology-based businesses like Uber and Lyft, the House GOP is right to note it will strive to remove barriers for the companies and their employees. These services deserve a stable framework in which to operate and provide much-needed transportation options for residents throughout the state.

Deregulating occupational licensure is another good priority. No one should need a license to braid or cut hair, provide landscaping or make interior design recommendations, or any number of other activities for which the state currently requires a license. Removing these barriers should boost job growth.

The GOP also identified several areas for reform in education, including shifting all new teachers to enroll in a 401(k) retirement system. It’s currently optional, so most teachers opt for the more traditional pension plan. With the House focused on this, Michigan’s largest unfunded liability might get the reform it needs.

The lawmakers also identified reforms in sentencing and corrections policies as key, along with civil asset forfeiture reform. Michigan’s criminal justice system is bloated and often unequal in its treatment. Establishing more equitable and efficient guidelines will help.

And on energy, a key priority will be allowing utilities to use out-of-state renewable energy to meet Michigan’s renewable mandate. Currently, the companies lose money trying to meet these goals, and reforming this law would be a simple fix.

It’s an ambitious list, but Michigan will be better off if these ideas are pursued.

Article source: http://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/editorials/2015/02/13/edit-michigan-house-smart-agenda/23368645/

Live ‘happily ever after’ in one of these real fairy tale homes

Real estate

3 hours ago

Looking for a place to live happily ever after? For the whimsical at heart, we’ve collected homes for sale that look straight out of a fairy tale.

Woodstock, Connecticut

450 Brickyard Rd, Woodstock, Connecticut
For sale: $45 million

Courtesy of Zillow

With glimmering spires, sweeping great rooms and eight royal bedrooms, this home is fit for a modern-day Cinderella.

See more Woodstock homes for sale.

Edwards, Colorado

157 Pilgrim Dr, Edwards, Colorado
For sale: $7.25 million

Courtesy of Zillow

A prince on horseback wouldn’t seem out of place here. The English estate is set back among tall aspens, exquisite gardens and an enchanting brook.

See more homes listed in Edwards.

Ranger, Georgia

436 Liberty Church Rd NE, Ranger, GA
For sale: $899,900

Courtesy of Zillow

Located on 28.7 acres of green pastures and rolling hills, this four-bedroom, four-bath castle is a private getaway suited for royalty.

See more Ranger listings.

Vashon, Washington

12225 SW 164th St, Vashon, Washignton
For sale: $995,000

Courtesy of Zillow

“Welcome to Candyland” reads a sign by the front door of this home. With animal-shaped topiaries, a charming carriage house and decor fit for a tea party, the property is like a life-size doll house.

See more Vashon Island homes.

Bernardsville, New Jersey

450 Mendham Rd, Bernardsville, New Jersey
For sale: $12.885 million

Courtesy of Zillow

Built in 1896, this European-inspired home has a touch of whimsy at every turn. From formal gardens to an entertainment-level replica of a Parisian street scene, there’s something for everyone.

See more Bernardsville listings.

Garrison, New York

19 Lawes Ln, Garrison, New York
For sale: $3.9 million

Courtesy of Zillow

With hand-cut stone, hand-milled mahogany trim, Tudor chimneys, herringbone brickwork and more, Langhurst Lodge has the Old World charm reminiscent of a Grimm fairy tale.

See more homes for sale in Philipstown.

Snowmass, Colorado

163 Spruce Ridge Ln, Snowmass Village, Colorado
For sale: $7.9 million

Courtesy of Zillow

Surrounded by tulips and lush landscaping, this French-style chateau offers an idyllic slice of Colorado paradise.

See more Snowmass Village listings.

Sundance, Utah

2687 Stewart Rd, Sundance, Utah
For sale: $2.94 million

Courtesy of Zillow

This home combines castle-like luxury with a storybook setting. According to the listing description, “you are greeted by majestic views of Stewart Falls and Timpanogos Cirque through every window.”

See more Utah County real estate.

Muenster, Texas

6868 S FM 373, Muenster, Texas
For sale: $795,000

Courtesy of Zillow

In Muenster, Texas, your own private palace awaits. The home is royally appointed with gorgeous hardwoods, a fireplace, coffered ceilings, elegant living spaces and more.

See nearby listings.

Topanga, California

21128 Bellini Dr, Topanga, California
For sale: $2.999 million

Courtesy of Zillow

Nothing says “storybook” like a classic Tudor estate. Up a winding stone path, the home boasts a grand foyer, a private hilltop gazebo, fireplace and rose garden.

See more homes in Topanga.

Related:

© 2006-2014 Zillow Inc., All Rights Reserved

Article source: http://www.today.com/home/live-happily-ever-after-one-these-real-fairy-tale-homes-2D80489229

Live ‘happily ever after’ in one of these real fairy tale homes

Real estate

3 hours ago

Looking for a place to live happily ever after? For the whimsical at heart, we’ve collected homes for sale that look straight out of a fairy tale.

Woodstock, Connecticut

450 Brickyard Rd, Woodstock, Connecticut
For sale: $45 million

Courtesy of Zillow

With glimmering spires, sweeping great rooms and eight royal bedrooms, this home is fit for a modern-day Cinderella.

See more Woodstock homes for sale.

Edwards, Colorado

157 Pilgrim Dr, Edwards, Colorado
For sale: $7.25 million

Courtesy of Zillow

A prince on horseback wouldn’t seem out of place here. The English estate is set back among tall aspens, exquisite gardens and an enchanting brook.

See more homes listed in Edwards.

Ranger, Georgia

436 Liberty Church Rd NE, Ranger, GA
For sale: $899,900

Courtesy of Zillow

Located on 28.7 acres of green pastures and rolling hills, this four-bedroom, four-bath castle is a private getaway suited for royalty.

See more Ranger listings.

Vashon, Washington

12225 SW 164th St, Vashon, Washignton
For sale: $995,000

Courtesy of Zillow

“Welcome to Candyland” reads a sign by the front door of this home. With animal-shaped topiaries, a charming carriage house and decor fit for a tea party, the property is like a life-size doll house.

See more Vashon Island homes.

Bernardsville, New Jersey

450 Mendham Rd, Bernardsville, New Jersey
For sale: $12.885 million

Courtesy of Zillow

Built in 1896, this European-inspired home has a touch of whimsy at every turn. From formal gardens to an entertainment-level replica of a Parisian street scene, there’s something for everyone.

See more Bernardsville listings.

Garrison, New York

19 Lawes Ln, Garrison, New York
For sale: $3.9 million

Courtesy of Zillow

With hand-cut stone, hand-milled mahogany trim, Tudor chimneys, herringbone brickwork and more, Langhurst Lodge has the Old World charm reminiscent of a Grimm fairy tale.

See more homes for sale in Philipstown.

Snowmass, Colorado

163 Spruce Ridge Ln, Snowmass Village, Colorado
For sale: $7.9 million

Courtesy of Zillow

Surrounded by tulips and lush landscaping, this French-style chateau offers an idyllic slice of Colorado paradise.

See more Snowmass Village listings.

Sundance, Utah

2687 Stewart Rd, Sundance, Utah
For sale: $2.94 million

Courtesy of Zillow

This home combines castle-like luxury with a storybook setting. According to the listing description, “you are greeted by majestic views of Stewart Falls and Timpanogos Cirque through every window.”

See more Utah County real estate.

Muenster, Texas

6868 S FM 373, Muenster, Texas
For sale: $795,000

Courtesy of Zillow

In Muenster, Texas, your own private palace awaits. The home is royally appointed with gorgeous hardwoods, a fireplace, coffered ceilings, elegant living spaces and more.

See nearby listings.

Topanga, California

21128 Bellini Dr, Topanga, California
For sale: $2.999 million

Courtesy of Zillow

Nothing says “storybook” like a classic Tudor estate. Up a winding stone path, the home boasts a grand foyer, a private hilltop gazebo, fireplace and rose garden.

See more homes in Topanga.

Related:

© 2006-2014 Zillow Inc., All Rights Reserved

Article source: http://www.today.com/home/live-happily-ever-after-one-these-real-fairy-tale-homes-2D80489229

Trowel & Glove: Marin garden calendar for the week of Feb. 14, 2015



Marin

Bonsai 101: Join Daryl Quijano for a bonsai make-and-take workshop at 10:30 a.m. Feb. 15 at Sloat Garden Center at 401 Miller Ave. in Mill Valley location. $65, $55 for Rewards members. Call 388-0365 for reservations. For more information, go to www.sloatgardens.com.

Pruning hydrangeas: Elizabeth Ruiz leads a workshop on pruning hydrangeas at 10:30 a.m. Feb. 15 at Sloat Garden Center at 2000 Novato Blvd. in Novato. Call 897-2169 for reservations. Or go to the workshop at 1:30 p.m. at Sloat’s at 700 Sir Francis Drake Blvd. in Kentfield. Call 454-0262 for reservations. $10, free for Rewards members. For more information, go to www.sloatgardens.com.

Garden design clinics: Meet-and-greet clinics with garden designers will be offered at Sloat Garden Centers from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 18. Gloria Sanchez will be at the 401 Miller Ave. location; Jen Strobel will be at the 700 Sir Francis Drake Blvd. location; and Becky Vandiver will be at the 2000 Novato Blvd. location. No registration required. For more information, go to www.sloatgardens.com.

Adaptive gardening: Marin Master Gardener Toni Gattone leads a “Garden for Life with Adaptive Gardening” workshop from 2 to 3 p.m. Feb. 20 at the San Rafael Public Library Reading Room at 1100 E St. in San Rafael. Free. Go to www.srpubliclibrary.org.

Identifying pests: Marin Master Gardener Terumi Leniow leads a “The Feng Shui Dynamics of IPM” workshop from 11 a.m. to noon Feb. 21 at Mill Valley Public Library at 375 Throckmorton Ave. in Mill Valley. Free. Go to www.millvalleylibrary.org.

Gardening volunteers: The Novato Independent Elders Program seeks volunteers to help Novato seniors with their overgrown yards Tuesday mornings or Thursday afternoons. Call 899-8296.

Nursery volunteers: Volunteers are sought to help in Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy nurseries from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesdays at Tennessee Valley, 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday; 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, or 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays at Marin Headlands Nursery; or 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays at Muir Beach, 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays in the Marin Headlands. Call 561-3077 or go to www.parksconservancy.org/get-involved/volunteer.

Nursery days: The SPAWN (Salmon Protection and Watershed Network) native plant nursery days are from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fridays and weekends. Call 663-8590, ext. 114, or email preston@tirn.net to register and for directions. Go to www.spawnusa.org for more information.

Garden visits: Marin Master Gardeners and the Marin Municipal Water District offer free residential Bay-Friendly Garden Walks to MMWD customers. The year-round service helps homeowners identify water-saving opportunities and soil conservation techniques for their landscaping. Call 473-4204 to request a visit to your garden.

Garden volunteers: Marin Open Garden Project (MOGP) volunteers are available to help Marin residents glean excess fruit from their trees for donations to local organizations serving people in need and to build raised beds to start vegetable gardens through the MicroGardens program. MGOP also offers a garden tool lending library. Go to www.opengardenproject.org or email contact@opengardenproject.org.

Harvesting volunteers: The Marin Organic Glean Team seeks volunteers to harvest extras from the fields at various farms for the organic school lunch and gleaning program. Call 663-9667 or go to www.marinorganic.org.

Around the bay

Landscape garden: Cornerstone Gardens is a permanent, gallery-style garden featuring walk-through installations by international landscape designers on nine acres at 23570 Highway 121 in Sonoma. Free. Call 707-933-3010 or go to www.cornerstonegardens.com.

Olive ranch: McEvoy Ranch at 5935 Red Hill Road in Petaluma offers tours, workshops and special events. Call 707-769-4123 or go to www.mcevoyranch.com.

Botanical garden: Quarryhill Botanical Garden at 12841 Sonoma Highway in Glen Ellen covers 61 acres and showcases a large selection of scientifically documented wild source temperate Asian plants. The garden is open for self-guided tours from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. $5 to $10. Call 707-996-3166 or go to www.quarryhillbg.org.

— Compiled by Adrian Rodriguez

The Trowel Glove Calendar appears Saturdays. Send high-resolution jpg photo attachments and details about your event to calendar@marinij.com or mail to Home and Garden Calendar/Lifestyles, Marin Independent Journal, 4000 Civic Center Drive, Suite 301, San Rafael, CA 94903. Items should be sent two weeks in advance. Photos should be a minimum of 2 megabytes and include caption information. Include a daytime phone number on your release.

Article source: http://www.marinij.com/lifestyle/20150213/trowel-glove-marin-garden-calendar-for-the-week-of-feb-14-2015

Trowel & Glove: Marin garden calendar for the week of Feb. 14, 2015



Marin

Bonsai 101: Join Daryl Quijano for a bonsai make-and-take workshop at 10:30 a.m. Feb. 15 at Sloat Garden Center at 401 Miller Ave. in Mill Valley location. $65, $55 for Rewards members. Call 388-0365 for reservations. For more information, go to www.sloatgardens.com.

Pruning hydrangeas: Elizabeth Ruiz leads a workshop on pruning hydrangeas at 10:30 a.m. Feb. 15 at Sloat Garden Center at 2000 Novato Blvd. in Novato. Call 897-2169 for reservations. Or go to the workshop at 1:30 p.m. at Sloat’s at 700 Sir Francis Drake Blvd. in Kentfield. Call 454-0262 for reservations. $10, free for Rewards members. For more information, go to www.sloatgardens.com.

Garden design clinics: Meet-and-greet clinics with garden designers will be offered at Sloat Garden Centers from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 18. Gloria Sanchez will be at the 401 Miller Ave. location; Jen Strobel will be at the 700 Sir Francis Drake Blvd. location; and Becky Vandiver will be at the 2000 Novato Blvd. location. No registration required. For more information, go to www.sloatgardens.com.

Adaptive gardening: Marin Master Gardener Toni Gattone leads a “Garden for Life with Adaptive Gardening” workshop from 2 to 3 p.m. Feb. 20 at the San Rafael Public Library Reading Room at 1100 E St. in San Rafael. Free. Go to www.srpubliclibrary.org.

Identifying pests: Marin Master Gardener Terumi Leniow leads a “The Feng Shui Dynamics of IPM” workshop from 11 a.m. to noon Feb. 21 at Mill Valley Public Library at 375 Throckmorton Ave. in Mill Valley. Free. Go to www.millvalleylibrary.org.

Gardening volunteers: The Novato Independent Elders Program seeks volunteers to help Novato seniors with their overgrown yards Tuesday mornings or Thursday afternoons. Call 899-8296.

Nursery volunteers: Volunteers are sought to help in Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy nurseries from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesdays at Tennessee Valley, 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday; 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, or 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays at Marin Headlands Nursery; or 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays at Muir Beach, 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays in the Marin Headlands. Call 561-3077 or go to www.parksconservancy.org/get-involved/volunteer.

Nursery days: The SPAWN (Salmon Protection and Watershed Network) native plant nursery days are from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fridays and weekends. Call 663-8590, ext. 114, or email preston@tirn.net to register and for directions. Go to www.spawnusa.org for more information.

Garden visits: Marin Master Gardeners and the Marin Municipal Water District offer free residential Bay-Friendly Garden Walks to MMWD customers. The year-round service helps homeowners identify water-saving opportunities and soil conservation techniques for their landscaping. Call 473-4204 to request a visit to your garden.

Garden volunteers: Marin Open Garden Project (MOGP) volunteers are available to help Marin residents glean excess fruit from their trees for donations to local organizations serving people in need and to build raised beds to start vegetable gardens through the MicroGardens program. MGOP also offers a garden tool lending library. Go to www.opengardenproject.org or email contact@opengardenproject.org.

Harvesting volunteers: The Marin Organic Glean Team seeks volunteers to harvest extras from the fields at various farms for the organic school lunch and gleaning program. Call 663-9667 or go to www.marinorganic.org.

Around the bay

Landscape garden: Cornerstone Gardens is a permanent, gallery-style garden featuring walk-through installations by international landscape designers on nine acres at 23570 Highway 121 in Sonoma. Free. Call 707-933-3010 or go to www.cornerstonegardens.com.

Olive ranch: McEvoy Ranch at 5935 Red Hill Road in Petaluma offers tours, workshops and special events. Call 707-769-4123 or go to www.mcevoyranch.com.

Botanical garden: Quarryhill Botanical Garden at 12841 Sonoma Highway in Glen Ellen covers 61 acres and showcases a large selection of scientifically documented wild source temperate Asian plants. The garden is open for self-guided tours from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. $5 to $10. Call 707-996-3166 or go to www.quarryhillbg.org.

— Compiled by Adrian Rodriguez

The Trowel Glove Calendar appears Saturdays. Send high-resolution jpg photo attachments and details about your event to calendar@marinij.com or mail to Home and Garden Calendar/Lifestyles, Marin Independent Journal, 4000 Civic Center Drive, Suite 301, San Rafael, CA 94903. Items should be sent two weeks in advance. Photos should be a minimum of 2 megabytes and include caption information. Include a daytime phone number on your release.

Article source: http://www.marinij.com/lifestyle/20150213/trowel-glove-marin-garden-calendar-for-the-week-of-feb-14-2015