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Archives for January 2015

St. George Area Parade of Homes celebrates 25th Anniversary

ST. GEORGE — Construction crews, interior designers and landscapers are working overtime in southern Utah to put the finishing touches on more than two dozen show-stopping homes for the 25th annual St. George Area Parade of Homes to be held Feb. 13-22.

Taking place in Washington County, the self-guided tour will feature 28 brand new homes showcasing the latest in innovative designs, stunning interiors and one-of-a-kind landscaping.

“We’ve come a long way since our first parade in 1991,” Mari Smith, Southern Utah Home Builders Association Executive Officer Mari Smith said. “St. George is now recognized as one of the best-managed and most popular home shows in the entire country.”

Because of the 25th Anniversary, organizers said they anticipate even more visitors than last year’s attendance of nearly 30,000.

Smith said the secret to keeping the crowds coming back every year is consistently providing impeccable craftsmanship and surprising creativity in every home.

“What sets us apart from other parades is the level of perfection we require from our builders,” Smith said. “We have strict standards and several inspections to ensure our visitors leave each house in awe.”

The theme for this year is “Frame Your Future,” which will encourage attendees to meet and talk with builders, decorators and landscapers to gather ideas and industry contacts for improving their current home or for building a new home.

The word to describe this year’s parade is variety,” 2015 Parade Chairman Austin Anderson said. “From price and square footage to location and design, we’ve got something for everyone.”

The 10-day event not only showcases the latest trends in design and building, Anderson said, but also reflects the health of the improving economy and the appetite for high-end features and environmentally friendly homes. This year, the homes start in the mid-$300s with seven priced at or above $1 million.

In addition to showcasing the best in home building, the parade also shows off the appeal of living in sunny Southern Utah. Taking advantage of the desert environment and red rock landscapes, many of the builders maximize living space by incorporating numerous courtyards, outdoor fireplaces and water features into the designs of the homes.

“The St. George Area Parade of Homes shows how our talented builders go beyond the everyday and create homes that are unique and inspiring,” SUHBA President Jair Almaraz said. “We’ve got the best of the best working here, and that is why our parade is so successful.”

In its 25 years of homebuilding, the St. George Area Parade of Homes has constructed more than 570 homes and pumped an estimated 600 million dollars into the local economy through construction jobs and by attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors to the area.

Homes will be open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. each day of the parade. As patrons exit each parade home, they can browse various booths displaying the latest in home products and related services. While some of this year’s parade homes are pre-sold, many are still on the market and available for purchase.

Back by popular demand is the official St. George Area Parade of Homes mobile app for Android and Apple devices. The free app allows attendees to preview homes and floor plans, navigate to the parade homes, access an e-ticket, view a list of building professionals, and save notes and photos of favorite homes.

“We have become an annual tradition for many throughout the region,” Almaraz said. “We appreciate our loyal visitors and can’t wait for them to experience our 25th Anniversary.”

Tickets are already available online. Beginning Feb. 12 at 5 p.m., tickets will be available at the Red Cliffs Mall center court, Lin’s Market locations and Zions Bank branches in Washington County. A portion of each ticket sale is given back to the community through the Southern Utah Home Builders Care Foundation, which contributes to local charities and education scholarships.

About the St. George Area Parade of Homes

The St. George Area Parade of Homes is an annual event produced by the Southern Utah Home Builders Association—a trade association representing more than 580 building industry professionals. SUHBA’s mission is to support the home building industry and benefit its members, partners and communities through education, relationships, advocacy and service. The St. George Area Parade of Homes is supported by longtime main sponsor Zions Bank and the following: Questar Gas, Boulevard Home Furnishings, Burton Lumber, Spectrum Media, KONY 99.9, KSL Television and KSL.com.

Event details and resources

  • What: 25th Annual St. George Area Parade of Homes
  • When: Feb. 13-22, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Where: Various locations throughout Washington County
  • Tickets: Available online | Cost: $15
  • Contact: Parade of Homes website | Facebook | Telephone: 435-674-1400

Related posts

Submitted by: The St. George Area Parade of Homes

Email: news@stgnews.com

Twitter: @STGnews

Article source: https://www.stgeorgeutah.com/news/archive/2015/01/30/st-george-area-parade-of-homes-celebrates-25th-anniversary/

Coralville’s ‘Old Town Hall’ gets thumbs up for historic preservation




Coralville’s efforts to preserve the city’s roughly 130-year-old building known as Old Town Hall have not gone unnoticed.

The Johnson County Historic Preservation Commission presented the city Thursday with an award for historic preservation of the building, which sits alongside Biscuit Creek at 407 Fifth St.

Just Tuesday, the Coralville City Council approved a $72,068 contract with Oxford’s Roger Gwinnup Construction to install the building’s utilities and carry out some renovations to the interior and exterior.

Ellen Habel, Coralville’s assistant city administrator, said work will include adding stairs to the front and back of the building, a lift for accessibility and some repairs to the windows and plaster. Age-appropriate doors and air conditioning also will be installed and a later contract will be sought to add parking nearby.

The city has not yet determined the future use of the building, but Habel said the plan is something open to the public.

“It’s something we want to be sure the public has access to, but we haven’t yet decided on a final use,” Habel said. “That’s something we are going to be working on.”

Old Town Hall was originally built as Coralville Union Ecclesiastical Church in the early 1880s and was the second church in the city, built after the first was lost to a fire. In those years the building’s basement was often used for city meetings and gatherings.

No longer being used as a church in 1921, the building was sold to Coralville for $2,500 and was used as a school before renovations took place in 1953 and it became the official site for city operations.

Looking back, Coralville Mayor John Lundell said the fact that luck played a part in the fact that Old Town Hall still is standing.

“That building has been endangered a couple times,” he said. “Most recently by the flood of 2008 and then through a few other development projects that could have torn it down.”

Nonetheless, Coralville’s roughly 130-year-old town hall building still is standing and, after being moved — for the second time in its life span — this past May about a fifth of a mile to sit across the street from the city’s 1876 Schoolhouse, the two buildings make for an iconic entrance to Coralville’s Old Town District.

“It really creates a nice affect there next to the schoolhouse,” Lundell said. “I think it’s location is perfect.”

The city’s Old Town development includes a mix of townhomes, condos, and mixed use development along Fifth Street. Nearby lighting, landscaping and street reconstruction is also planned for the future.

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Article source: http://thegazette.com/subject/news/coralvilles-old-town-hall-gets-thumbs-up-for-historic-preservation-20150130

Fort Ord agency to hold workshops on redeveloping base

What are your design ideas about former Fort Ord redevelopment? The Fort Ord Reuse Authority (FORA) wants to know and is hosting a series of public workshops to elicit input on Regional Urban Design Guidelines. The workshops are an opportunity to offer input on the former Fort Ord village and town center, gateway, regional circulation corridor and trail design preferences. Public input will contribute to the eventual completion of the guidelines, which will include standards for road design, setbacks, building heights, landscaping, signage, and other matters of visual importance.

The public involvement process begins Monday, Feb. 2, with two consecutive events at the Carpenters Union Hall at 910 2nd Avenue, Marina (across from the Dunes shopping center off Imjin Parkway).

The first event, a forum from 1 to 4 p.m., features town planning and walkability experts Victor Dover, Peter Katz, and Jeff Speck discussing issues facing Fort Ord and how design guidelines can help shape the future of redevelopment. From 6 to 9 p.m. at the same location, a public workshop will provide community members an opportunity for hands-on participation and personal interface with the design team, Dover, Kohl Partners.

Several additional evening workshops are also scheduled at alternate locations to encourage broad community involvement and input during the design guideline process:

Wednesday, Feb. 4, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; and Saturday, Feb, 7, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Soper Field Community Center, 220 Coe Avenue in Seaside.

Thursday, Feb. 5, 3 to 5 p.m. at California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) Student Center, Building 12 (Intergarrison Road, Seaside)

Saturday, Feb. 7, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at Marina Public Library, 190 Seaside Circle in Marina (behind the Walmart shopping center).

Members of the public are encouraged to attend one or more of these events. Participants will interact with urban planners, economists, transportation engineers, and environmental experts working on producing the draft guidelines. Each workshop will also include progress reports about items generated in prior workshop sessions.

From Feb. 3 through 10, the public is also invited to stop by the FORA office between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. to speak with design team members and provide input as the design guidelines evolve.

A public open house at the “design studio” at FORA will be held Monday, Feb. 9, from 6 to 8 p.m., offering an additional opportunity for public input and review.

Wednesday, Feb. 11 from 6 to 9 p.m., a “charrette” workshop at the FORA offices will present a work-in-progress review and design team wrap-up session.

More information and details about the RUDG process can be found on the FORA website (www.fora.org) or by contacting the FORA office at 883-3672.

Article source: http://www.thecalifornian.com/story/news/local/2015/01/30/fort-ord-agency-hold-workshops-redeveloping-base/22617191/

Richly varigated ajuga brightens shady bed

QUESTION: I am looking for a groundcover, or some other low-growing plant to brighten a shady bed. What do you recommend?

ANSWER: Several groundcovers come to mind, but especially ajuga, and more specifically the following variegated cultivars: black scallop, which features shiny, dark purple leaves; burgundy glow, offering foliage that ranges from green to purplish maroon; and dixie chip, featuring foliage streaked with white, cream and pink. All are decorated in spring with blue flowers that rise above the foliage. The multicolored leaves make ajuga a good choice for gardens with shade — not only because the light tones stand out, but also because the plants are quite shade tolerant.

Plants develop rosettes or tufts of leaves that spread to 1 1/2 feet or so with good culture. Flowers are blue, borne on 4- to 6-inch spikes, mainly during spring and summer. Because the foliage develops into dense mats, it is helpful to thin out or rework beds periodically to maintain a uniform coverage. Propagation is usually by division or separation of clumps.

Although ajuga has a reputation for being somewhat invasive, this selection grows at a moderate rate and presents few problems. Light sun to partial shade to full shade produce the best performance. Excellent drainage is important because ajuga needs moist, but never waterlogged or saturated, soil. The bed should be free of nematodes as the variegated selections are more severely affected by nematodes and root disorders than are selections that are not variegated. Ajuga is generally tolerant of pH, but some growers suggest that neutral to slightly alkaline locations are best.

Those lovely catalogs

Q: My husband and I, both new to gardening, are having a wonderful time looking at gardening catalogs that come in the mail. Are we taking a big chance ordering plants by mail?

A: Experienced gardeners often order hard-to-locate plants from reputable catalog nurseries. But inexperienced gardeners frequently end up with plants that just won’t survive in our hot, humid climate, despite the catalog company’s sincere efforts to make practical recommendations. Another problem is plant cost which is usually higher than what you would pay locally, and the sometimes very expensive cost of shipping. Also, there’s the possibility of damage in shipping and the complications involved in returning plant stock.

Helpful information about mail order nurseries is available on the website Dave’s Garden which contains a weekly feature called The Garden Watchdog. Here gardeners share their opinions on which companies really deliver on quality, price and service. Check it out at Davesgarden.com.

Many gardeners use catalogs to get ideas, then check area nurseries and to see which plants are available locally. Whether they buy them locally or from the catalog, they can be fairly safe in assuming that these will grow for us.

However, if you like to experiment with different varieties and you’re willing to lose a few plants, you can have lots of fun shopping from gardening catalogs. They provide a time saving opportunity to window-shop and to study new plant varieties and designs and combinations. Some catalogs furnish so much good information in text and/or pictures that they are useful as permanent reference books.

Become your own landscape designer

Megan Montgomery, a licensed Landscape Architect, and Master Gardener, class of 2014, will be the speaker for the Lafayette Parish Master Gardener general meeting 6 p.m. Feb. 4, at the South Regional Library. Her topic will be “Becoming Your Own Landscape Designer.”

She will teach the basics of drawing a landscape, using a circle template, engineering scale, and a pencil. Persons interested in drawing along with her may purchase these instruments at Louisiana Digital, UL’s Student Union Store, or other graphic design stores.

Megan is a native of Lafayette and owns Verde Design Studio (verdedesignstudio.org/about-us.html). She has a bachelor’s degree in Landscape Architecture from Texas AM University, and is a licensed Louisiana horticulturist with more than 10 years of professional experience in the landscaping industry. The talk is free and the public is welcome.

To send questions or comments to Acadiana Gardening please email ajustice@bellsouth.net. Ann’s books, “Ornamental Gardening in Acadiana,” and “Blooming Trees and Shrubs of the Coastal South,” are available at local plant nurseries and from Amazon.com.

Article source: http://www.theadvertiser.com/story/life/home_garden/2015/01/30/richly-varigated-ajuga-brightens-shady-bed/22632903/

As ‘appropriate’ gardening takes root, there’s still room for ‘wow’

It is perhaps both a blessing and a curse that Southern California has so many natural gifts — a blissfully temperate climate and accommodating soils — to offer the gardener. Early settlers undoubtedly looked at their new surroundings and saw a blank slate.

From the Mexicans and Spanish to Easterners and Europeans, new arrivals unpacked their garden vernacular from wherever they hailed and set to work re-creating the lands they had left behind. Despite periodic droughts, gardens grew big and blowsy, accompanied by wall-to-wall carpets of lawn more suitable to Kentucky than semi-arid California. In the early 20th century, the arrival of plentiful water from the Owens Valley did nothing to curb the appetite for gardens that looked nothing like their original environment. And although various waves of newcomers experienced periods of drought, they often went back to their old ways when the rains returned.

lRelated Tips and inspiration for gardening in drought
Home GardenTips and inspiration for gardening in droughtSee all related

My vision for the future — what I expect and hope will happen — is that natives will become a larger portion of the garden. Our tradition is largely based on the English tradition. If the Spanish had been the dominant settlers, we would not look like this. We would never have had lawns.

People are beginning to garden [according to] where we live. As natives become a larger portion of the garden, that will bring a number of benefits. One, of course, is less water use, but there are non-native plants that can do that too. What native plants do is create a real sense of place.

Another thing native plants bring is the wildlife that depend on them. If we bring those plants back into our environment, [the animals] will follow.

I’m not talking about replicating the natural environment in your yard. You have to select plants so they look good. [But] gardeners are not as familiar with the native flora, so they don’t know how to keep them looking good. We are starting a professional development program to help deal with this issue.

My ultimate vision of Los Angeles, though, is a smell. We will smell like California. Having [that] will make this a particular place.

Nicholas Staddon, director of new plants for Monrovia Nursery and a member of the Royal Horticulture Society, the California Assn. of Nurserymen and the American Nursery and Landscape Assn.

One of the things that will define Southern California gardens in the future is the cultures that plant them. We have this incredible diversity of people from all over the world. They will have their own types of plants that they love. And you will also see the integration of edible gardens worked into these landscapes in a seamless line.

I also think we will continue to see a lush California landscape. [But] right plant, right soil, right irrigation is a thought really worth a good long consideration.

As I drive around Southern California, I see we are doing a rip-roaring job of wasting water. Gardens can be a mix of all things and a mix of plants that grow in a Mediterranean-type climate around the world. Too often I’m seeing gardens today that are being slapped in, a lot of rocks that reflect heat, succulents that don’t work together. After a couple of years, we’re not getting out of the garden what we are expecting.

People want emotional fulfillment. We still want to go out to our gardens, have our hearts go pitter-patter and say, “That’s so beautiful.” Yes, there are a lot of natives out there, but how many are visually desirable and work in our gardens?

Developing cultivars of natives is a great opportunity to create plants that are more floriferous, more compact, more disease-resistant, more emotionally fulfilling. If we could create a more compact, more evenly growing toyon, that would be the cat’s meow, wouldn’t it?

Nancy Goslee Power, principal, Nancy Goslee Power and Associates landscape and garden design firm and an authority on Southern California landscaping

I’m in my 70s now, and what I learned in the beginning I’m still applying. But it’s more layered now. There is a general awareness that it’s important to plant plants that will thrive here with less water.

With a huge population, every piece of green will become more precious. There are places where grass is appropriate and places where you can cut back on the amount of grass you have. There are wonderful California native grasses that we can mow and they end up looking terrific.

I think a garden with only natives, though, there’s no “wow” factor. It just looks too messy. We have wonderful plants from all over the world that grow in conditions like ours. They blend with our natural habitat colors of blue-greens, olives, dark and fuzzy grays.

You have to be optimistic when you garden. There’s no bad plant, it’s how you use it. There is a place for impatiens in a garden with a little shade. I believe in appropriate but also in trying something for the hell of it. I’m positive about the future. Things will come up. I’m not a whiner. Find a way.

::

Contemplating an environmentally appropriate change in the garden? Our experts share their wish lists:

Kitty Connolly: Plants that smell like California

California Sagebrush

California Everlasting

California Brittlebush

Western Columbine

Mule Fat

Cleveland Sage

Nicholas Staddon: Plants that are surprisingly water-wise when established

Agapanthus Sunstripe

Agapanthus Baby Pete

Hibiscus Red Darling

Laurus Little Ragu

Pittosporum Golf Ball

Camellia Pink-a-Boo

Punica Angel Red

Syringa Declaration

Nancy Goslee Power: California’s native color palette

Indian Hawthorn

Fox Tail Agave

Prostrate Rosemary

Cleveland Sage

Pacific Wax Myrtle

California Field Sedge

home@latimes.com

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/home/la-hm-future-gardening-20150131-story.html

Home show offers taste of spring

Does the mild winter weather have you already thinking about spring gardening? March is just around the corner, and now’s the time to be thinking about taking your home landscape to the next level.

If you need some inspiration, perhaps you’d enjoy a day at the Central Ohio Home Garden Show, planned for Feb. 14 through 22 at the Ohio Expo Center at the Ohio State Fairgrounds in Columbus. Spanning two weekends, the show features more than 450 exhibits, offering a plethora of gardening, landscaping, home improvement and home interior experts all in one place.

It’s packed with special events and attractions for all ages, including celebrities and daily cooking, gardening, home décor and home improvement presentations on two stages. Attendees can shop for every imaginable tool, accessory and service for any home improvement or landscape project.

Twelve full-size gardens make the Central Ohio Home Garden Show a first glimpse of spring. This year, the Mount Vernon Barn Co. is building a rustic barn that will be surrounded by a colorful garden and be fully decked out and decorated by other show exhibitors.

The show features 250,000 square feet of home and garden ideas and inspirations from more than 350 area craftsmen, experts and professionals covering every area of the home, inside and out. Two stages offer continuous professional demonstrations and do-it-yourself instruction as well as cooking demonstrations — including free samples — from area chefs, highlighted by the Crave Cooking Series on both Sundays.

Other special show features include Wine and Canvas Painting on Feb. 15, Ohio Craft Beer Night on Feb. 20 and Kids’ Day on Feb. 21.

We all know how much fun it is to see gardens in full bloom indoors at this time of year. Beyond the gardens, many attendees flock to the pros in the Home Improvement Expo, where they can shop for everything from a new roof, doors or windows to a basement makeover.

Show hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays and noon to 8 p.m. weekdays with the exception Feb. 17, when the show is closed. Tickets are $10 online when using the promotional code “LOWES” or $13 at the door for adults.

Tickets and complete show information are available at www.dispatchhomeandgardenshow.com. Parking is $5.

Steve Boehme and his wife, Marjorie, own GoodSeed Nursery Landscape near Winchester.

Article source: http://www.chillicothegazette.com/story/news/local/2015/01/30/home-show-offers-taste-spring/22557671/

Tips for dry weather gardening

 

When the weather’s dry it’s useful to check over your garden and see if a few well-placed cuts will improve the look and health of your plants.

For instance, as soon as winter heather quits blooming, it’s time to give it a trim all over to make room for fresh, new growth.

Afterwards, heather always appreciates some compost and peat spread around its roots, too.

Witchhazel seldom needs any pruning of its main branches, but suckers below the graft can constantly recur and be a major issue.

They should be dealt with immediately, as you see them by pulling them off the main trunk. Use pliers for this.

The winter jasmine (Jasminium nudiflorum) has usually stopped flowering when February gets under way. That’s when it’s best to cut side branches back to the main stems.

If not, it will flop all around in a mass of creeping green, spreading out long branches and rooting where it touches.

For people with big gardens, winter jasmine is a lovely ground-cover plant for a slope where it can quickly cover the whole area and give flowers all winter. Used like this, it doesn’t need pruning at all.

For grapes, you need to cut everything down to one trunk with two branches each side (all four will grow and fruit later this year) and also two stubs (two on each side, which will be branches the following year).

It’s a lot of work, but the thinned-down grapevine will produce grapes with access to sunshine for ripeness, and also air to deter molds and rots.

It’s also good to check any fruit trees as you pass by. Winter gales may have broken or roughed up some branches, and any dead or diseased ones should be cut out.

Where two branches are trying to share the same space, the weaker one should be removed.

Sunshine and air penetrate best when some of the branches pointing to the centre of the tree are taken out.

This should be encouraged by always pruning so that the top (dominant) bud in a branch is on the outside.

Also while you have your pruners out, it’s a good idea to cut back any fall flowering clematis such as Clematis.

Email gardening questions to amarrison@shaw.ca.

© 2015 Burnaby Now

Article source: http://www.burnabynow.com/community/gardening/tips-for-dry-weather-gardening-1.1746908

Tips for dry weather gardening

 

When the weather’s dry it’s useful to check over your garden and see if a few well-placed cuts will improve the look and health of your plants.

For instance, as soon as winter heather quits blooming, it’s time to give it a trim all over to make room for fresh, new growth.

Afterwards, heather always appreciates some compost and peat spread around its roots, too.

Witchhazel seldom needs any pruning of its main branches, but suckers below the graft can constantly recur and be a major issue.

They should be dealt with immediately, as you see them by pulling them off the main trunk. Use pliers for this.

The winter jasmine (Jasminium nudiflorum) has usually stopped flowering when February gets under way. That’s when it’s best to cut side branches back to the main stems.

If not, it will flop all around in a mass of creeping green, spreading out long branches and rooting where it touches.

For people with big gardens, winter jasmine is a lovely ground-cover plant for a slope where it can quickly cover the whole area and give flowers all winter. Used like this, it doesn’t need pruning at all.

For grapes, you need to cut everything down to one trunk with two branches each side (all four will grow and fruit later this year) and also two stubs (two on each side, which will be branches the following year).

It’s a lot of work, but the thinned-down grapevine will produce grapes with access to sunshine for ripeness, and also air to deter molds and rots.

It’s also good to check any fruit trees as you pass by. Winter gales may have broken or roughed up some branches, and any dead or diseased ones should be cut out.

Where two branches are trying to share the same space, the weaker one should be removed.

Sunshine and air penetrate best when some of the branches pointing to the centre of the tree are taken out.

This should be encouraged by always pruning so that the top (dominant) bud in a branch is on the outside.

Also while you have your pruners out, it’s a good idea to cut back any fall flowering clematis such as Clematis.

Email gardening questions to amarrison@shaw.ca.

© 2015 Burnaby Now

Article source: http://www.burnabynow.com/community/gardening/tips-for-dry-weather-gardening-1.1746908

Get clever with clematis: Alan Titchmarsh shares his pruning tips

The large-flowered varieties of clematis – the Nelly Moser and Jackmanii – can be pruned at any time over the next few weeks as soon as you see their silky buds emerging. Don’t be too afraid. Cut back all that top growth to strong buds or shoots between waist and chest height.

You can adopt the same system with the yellow-flowered and fluffy-seeded Clematis orientalis and Clematis tangutica, but where these grow over a trellis or arbour you can cut back to any healthy pair of silky buds that are about to grow away, removing the tangle of dead growth beyond them.

The bell-shaped and pixie hat-shaped clematis – Clematis texensis and Clematis viticella – are the easiest of all to cut back. Pruning of these clematis consists quite simply of cutting them right back to ground level now, to flower again in the summer.

With this as your rough guide, you should find clematis pruning much less intimidating, and your plants will not suffer a jot.

Don’t miss Alan’s gardening column in today’s Daily Express. For more information on his range of gardening products, visit alantitchmarsh.com

Article source: http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/garden/554905/How-to-prune-clematis-Alan-Titchmarsh

Get clever with clematis: Alan Titchmarsh shares his pruning tips

The large-flowered varieties of clematis – the Nelly Moser and Jackmanii – can be pruned at any time over the next few weeks as soon as you see their silky buds emerging. Don’t be too afraid. Cut back all that top growth to strong buds or shoots between waist and chest height.

You can adopt the same system with the yellow-flowered and fluffy-seeded Clematis orientalis and Clematis tangutica, but where these grow over a trellis or arbour you can cut back to any healthy pair of silky buds that are about to grow away, removing the tangle of dead growth beyond them.

The bell-shaped and pixie hat-shaped clematis – Clematis texensis and Clematis viticella – are the easiest of all to cut back. Pruning of these clematis consists quite simply of cutting them right back to ground level now, to flower again in the summer.

With this as your rough guide, you should find clematis pruning much less intimidating, and your plants will not suffer a jot.

Don’t miss Alan’s gardening column in today’s Daily Express. For more information on his range of gardening products, visit alantitchmarsh.com

Article source: http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/garden/554905/How-to-prune-clematis-Alan-Titchmarsh