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Archives for December 14, 2014

Gardening tips: Water your evergreens; running out of time for bulbs

Water your evergreens

Valued evergreens such as camellias, hollies, southern magnolias and rhododendrons should be fully hydrated before the ground freezes to minimize winter kill related to desiccation.

On a mild day, use a large watering can or five-gallon bucket to soak the root zone, but hold the fertilizer.

Still time for bulbs

Spring bulbs still can be planted before the ground freezes, but the longer they are out of the ground, the higher the risk of decay. Bulbs should feel firm when squeezed. For crocuses, daffodils and others that have already begun to sprout, take care not to damage the growing tips when planting.

Article source: http://www.concordmonitor.com/home/14770216-95/gardening-tips-water-your-evergreens-running-out-of-time-for-bulbs

Gardening tips: Water your evergreens; running out of time for bulbs

Water your evergreens

Valued evergreens such as camellias, hollies, southern magnolias and rhododendrons should be fully hydrated before the ground freezes to minimize winter kill related to desiccation.

On a mild day, use a large watering can or five-gallon bucket to soak the root zone, but hold the fertilizer.

Still time for bulbs

Spring bulbs still can be planted before the ground freezes, but the longer they are out of the ground, the higher the risk of decay. Bulbs should feel firm when squeezed. For crocuses, daffodils and others that have already begun to sprout, take care not to damage the growing tips when planting.

Article source: http://www.concordmonitor.com/home/14770216-95/gardening-tips-water-your-evergreens-running-out-of-time-for-bulbs

Your Garden Guy: Tips for keeping ‘living’ Christmas trees alive

Local State

Santa brings reindeer to Perry

Article source: http://www.macon.com/2014/12/11/3472810/tips-for-keeping-living-christmas.html

Your Garden Guy: Tips for keeping ‘living’ Christmas trees alive

Local State

Santa brings reindeer to Perry

Article source: http://www.macon.com/2014/12/11/3472810/tips-for-keeping-living-christmas.html

Your Garden Guy: Tips for keeping ‘living’ Christmas trees alive

Local State

Santa brings reindeer to Perry

Article source: http://www.macon.com/2014/12/11/3472810/tips-for-keeping-living-christmas.html

IN THE GARDEN: Tips for live trees

Posted: Sunday, December 14, 2014 12:15 am

IN THE GARDEN: Tips for live trees

By Leeann Barton

stwnewspress.com

In case you haven’t noticed, I love trees. I love selling them, pruning them, removing weed trees, planting unique trees; evergreen or deciduous, I am hard pressed to think of a tree I consider worthless.

I used to be a purist – only living Christmas trees would do; be they potted or ball and burlap (BB), one foot tall or eight, live was the only righteous choice. One day a friend challenged me with his perspective that growers of cut Christmas trees were just as much a part of the horticulture industry as I (a nursery manager) was. Cut trees were well cared for, lovingly sheared to perfect their shape and contributed to the global balance while alive. The growers were essentially farmers, harvesting a portion of their stock each year for market.

I have purchased cut and live trees, but find myself looking at live trees.

By far the most common potted evergreens available in Oklahoma are junipers. They are tough, adaptable and big strides have been made in breeding selections that have more to offer than the local, overpopulated juniper known as Eastern Red Cedar. I have never, however, met a juniper that wasn’t prickly to the touch and for me this is a deterrent for purchasing one. Although not the classic Christmas tree with strong, horizontal branches, junipers can be decorated with ribbons, popcorn, garlands, etc.

A few pines are frequently found in the potted tree selections. Pines grow fast but have a few more diseases to watch out for once planted in the yard. Excellent drainage, wise positioning of sprinklers and proper fertilization will help pine purchasers from having buyer’s remorse. Also, be aware that most pines prefer a slightly cooler summer. I do think it is relatively safe to plant pines and pray we don’t have 115-degree summer.

Those wanting a live tree have to reduce its time indoors to a minimum. Seven to 10 days is preferred, not to exceed two weeks. Of course as with any tree or plant, position it away from a heat vent or sunny window for its indoor stay. Indoors, live trees lose moisture through their needles quickly; excessive water to the roots does little to help. Lightly misting the tree is a better solution, but one would need to forego the lights and certain decorations to mist.

Next week … how to help the tree to transition to an Oklahoma January.

LeeAnn Barton has worked with nurseries for more than 20 years. She digs in the dirt in Stillwater. Direct questions to her by emailing leeannbarton@sbcglobal.net.


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Sunday, December 14, 2014 12:15 am.

Article source: http://www.stwnewspress.com/community/local_columnists/in-the-garden-tips-for-live-trees/article_7cb35694-8326-11e4-979f-ebdf8dae62db.html

IN THE GARDEN: Tips for live trees

Posted: Sunday, December 14, 2014 12:15 am

IN THE GARDEN: Tips for live trees

By Leeann Barton

stwnewspress.com

In case you haven’t noticed, I love trees. I love selling them, pruning them, removing weed trees, planting unique trees; evergreen or deciduous, I am hard pressed to think of a tree I consider worthless.

I used to be a purist – only living Christmas trees would do; be they potted or ball and burlap (BB), one foot tall or eight, live was the only righteous choice. One day a friend challenged me with his perspective that growers of cut Christmas trees were just as much a part of the horticulture industry as I (a nursery manager) was. Cut trees were well cared for, lovingly sheared to perfect their shape and contributed to the global balance while alive. The growers were essentially farmers, harvesting a portion of their stock each year for market.

I have purchased cut and live trees, but find myself looking at live trees.

By far the most common potted evergreens available in Oklahoma are junipers. They are tough, adaptable and big strides have been made in breeding selections that have more to offer than the local, overpopulated juniper known as Eastern Red Cedar. I have never, however, met a juniper that wasn’t prickly to the touch and for me this is a deterrent for purchasing one. Although not the classic Christmas tree with strong, horizontal branches, junipers can be decorated with ribbons, popcorn, garlands, etc.

A few pines are frequently found in the potted tree selections. Pines grow fast but have a few more diseases to watch out for once planted in the yard. Excellent drainage, wise positioning of sprinklers and proper fertilization will help pine purchasers from having buyer’s remorse. Also, be aware that most pines prefer a slightly cooler summer. I do think it is relatively safe to plant pines and pray we don’t have 115-degree summer.

Those wanting a live tree have to reduce its time indoors to a minimum. Seven to 10 days is preferred, not to exceed two weeks. Of course as with any tree or plant, position it away from a heat vent or sunny window for its indoor stay. Indoors, live trees lose moisture through their needles quickly; excessive water to the roots does little to help. Lightly misting the tree is a better solution, but one would need to forego the lights and certain decorations to mist.

Next week … how to help the tree to transition to an Oklahoma January.

LeeAnn Barton has worked with nurseries for more than 20 years. She digs in the dirt in Stillwater. Direct questions to her by emailing leeannbarton@sbcglobal.net.


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Sunday, December 14, 2014 12:15 am.

Article source: http://www.stwnewspress.com/community/local_columnists/in-the-garden-tips-for-live-trees/article_7cb35694-8326-11e4-979f-ebdf8dae62db.html

IN THE GARDEN: Tips for live trees

Posted: Sunday, December 14, 2014 12:15 am

IN THE GARDEN: Tips for live trees

By Leeann Barton

stwnewspress.com

In case you haven’t noticed, I love trees. I love selling them, pruning them, removing weed trees, planting unique trees; evergreen or deciduous, I am hard pressed to think of a tree I consider worthless.

I used to be a purist – only living Christmas trees would do; be they potted or ball and burlap (BB), one foot tall or eight, live was the only righteous choice. One day a friend challenged me with his perspective that growers of cut Christmas trees were just as much a part of the horticulture industry as I (a nursery manager) was. Cut trees were well cared for, lovingly sheared to perfect their shape and contributed to the global balance while alive. The growers were essentially farmers, harvesting a portion of their stock each year for market.

I have purchased cut and live trees, but find myself looking at live trees.

By far the most common potted evergreens available in Oklahoma are junipers. They are tough, adaptable and big strides have been made in breeding selections that have more to offer than the local, overpopulated juniper known as Eastern Red Cedar. I have never, however, met a juniper that wasn’t prickly to the touch and for me this is a deterrent for purchasing one. Although not the classic Christmas tree with strong, horizontal branches, junipers can be decorated with ribbons, popcorn, garlands, etc.

A few pines are frequently found in the potted tree selections. Pines grow fast but have a few more diseases to watch out for once planted in the yard. Excellent drainage, wise positioning of sprinklers and proper fertilization will help pine purchasers from having buyer’s remorse. Also, be aware that most pines prefer a slightly cooler summer. I do think it is relatively safe to plant pines and pray we don’t have 115-degree summer.

Those wanting a live tree have to reduce its time indoors to a minimum. Seven to 10 days is preferred, not to exceed two weeks. Of course as with any tree or plant, position it away from a heat vent or sunny window for its indoor stay. Indoors, live trees lose moisture through their needles quickly; excessive water to the roots does little to help. Lightly misting the tree is a better solution, but one would need to forego the lights and certain decorations to mist.

Next week … how to help the tree to transition to an Oklahoma January.

LeeAnn Barton has worked with nurseries for more than 20 years. She digs in the dirt in Stillwater. Direct questions to her by emailing leeannbarton@sbcglobal.net.


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Sunday, December 14, 2014 12:15 am.

Article source: http://www.stwnewspress.com/community/local_columnists/in-the-garden-tips-for-live-trees/article_7cb35694-8326-11e4-979f-ebdf8dae62db.html

Garden Club of Virginia to host Symposium 2015 Williamsburg


By Contributed Report


Posted Dec. 14, 2014 @ 2:01 am


Article source: http://www.progress-index.com/article/20141214/NEWS/141219970/13340/LIFESTYLE

Garden Club of Virginia to host Symposium 2015 Williamsburg


By Contributed Report


Posted Dec. 14, 2014 @ 2:01 am


Article source: http://www.progress-index.com/article/20141214/NEWS/141219970/13340/LIFESTYLE