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Archives for November 25, 2014

How to plant ornamental grasses for a winter wonderland garden

There are many other ornamental grasses you can grow in your garden, too, but those listed above can all be planted now because they come from cool climates.

Grasses take very little looking after once they are established, but they do need to be planted in well-draining soil in a sunny position.

The soil needs to be reasonably fertile and shouldn’t get dust-dry, but apart from a dose of spring fertiliser they will not need feeding or they will get too lush and not produce flowers.

All the ornamental grasses listed above will flower in summer and once they are established they can be cut back in spring to get rid of any winter debris and to promote new growth.

Article source: http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/garden/539997/Deborah-Stone-Ornamental-Grasses-Planting-Advice

Detectives seek tips from public after home-invasion robbery in Garden Home …

Washington County sheriff’s detectives are asking for the public’s help in identifying a suspect in a home-invasion robbery at a Garden Home apartment Monday afternoon.

Just after 2:25 p.m., deputies responded to an apartment complex in the 9100 block of Southwest Oleson Road near Tigard. A 22-year-old woman told deputies that a man forced his way into her apartment after kicking open the door, said Sgt. Bob Ray, a Washington County Sheriff’s Office spokesman.

The man pushed by the woman, went to a closet, seemingly looking for something specific, but he didn’t find it. A struggle ensued between the man and woman, and he took her purse before running away, Ray said.  

The woman, he said, recorded cell phone video of the man as he fled. Authorities don’t know what the man was looking for inside the closet, Ray said. 

Initial reports of the incident on Monday indicated that two men were involved. Ray said that another man was standing outside the apartment during the incident, and it’s unknown whether he was involved.

The description of the man who entered the apartment also changed from initial reports, Ray said.

The man was said to be in his 40s, taller than 6-foot, with a large build, Ray said. He had a gray “scruffy” beard and wore blue jeans, a green rain jacket and black-and-red baseball hat.

Deputies searched the area with a police dog but could not find the man.

Anyone with more information is asked to call sheriff’s detectives at 503-846-2500.

— Rebecca Woolington

Article source: http://www.oregonlive.com/tigard/index.ssf/2014/11/detectives_seek_tips_from_publ.html

A new compendium of garden elements

Over a decade or so beginning in the mid-1980s, I traveled a lot to see famous gardens, most of them in England. The touring was designed to acquaint myself with gardens regarded as important and necessary for a garden writer to know.

The only tangible reminder of those days is a box full of slides, which I don’t look at much because I know that when I do, gardens I once found genuinely thrilling now seem dated or pedestrian. There is magic, still, in some of the images: not so much in plant combinations, alas, but with garden elements — clean, broad stone steps of just the right proportion, or the filigreed silhouette of an iron gate.

The late Washington landscape designer Michael Bartlett was keenly aware of the elevating qualities of fine elements; he liked to create garden “rooms” that were distinct but flowed from one to the next. In a way, his gardens belonged to an earlier age, developed with and for patrons rather than clients. He crafted spaces that were ambitiously architectural but still restrained and elegant. I doubt he would have been a big fan of today’s hairy, ecologically driven horticulture. “He hated ornamental grasses,” said his wife, Rose Bartlett.

Gardens come and go, along with our perceptions of them, but Michael Bartlett has left one useful legacy. Twice a year, he and Rose would go on garden sojourns, and over a span of 30 years they visited perhaps a thousand gardens in 21 countries. They were always taking pictures of the garden bling they noticed, whether benches or dovecotes, and in time amassed approximately 10,000 slides.

He was still pondering them as he grew ill with a brain tumor. He died in 2008 at the age of 55. Six years later, the fruits of all that work have ripened with the publication of the “Bartlett Book of Garden Elements,” co-authored by Rose Bartlett.


(Photos courtesy of Michael V. and Rose L. Bartlett.)

The reader will find about a thousand photos of such elements as paving, bridges, fences, benches, fountains and gazebos, demonstrating that design comes in many forms.

Many of the elements are not to my taste, to be sure; I find iron benches as tough on the eye as on the lower back, and if I never see another turquoise Japanese bridge framed by weeping willows over a pond with water lilies, I will somehow cope with the loss. But there are things to covet in these pages: a sturdy but elegant wooden gate between brick piers, with open trellis work; square red bricks in a running bond pattern; the lovely clipped Linden Allee at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Herding these elements into likes and dislikes is fun, but the greater value is in understanding the breadth of design options when we put gardens together.

The Bartletts began their garden odyssey together in the 1970s. Michael would design and attend to the construction of his clients’ gardens. Rose would devise planting schemes for herb gardens and the like.

The images were used for slide talks and to show clients, but more important, the photo library became the vehicle for the couple to visit as many gardens as they could, rain or shine.

“We always considered our travels to be a form of continuing education,” said Rose Bartlett (the couple had met years before as students at the University of Pennsylvania). As the photo library grew, the idea for a book came to the fore.

The compendium is for students, designers and just “interested gardeners,” Rose Bartlett told me. She wrote in the introduction: “It is the well-thought-out and skillfully crafted details in a garden that distinguish a mundane design from one that sparks the imagination and pleases the senses.” Well-crafted elements “reveal the character of the garden, express the taste of its maker and add interest for the observer.”

To which I might add that beautiful elements alone don’t make a garden, they enhance it, especially if they have a unity about their materials and character.

The trick is to employ elements that don’t look ridiculously overwrought, exotic or ersatz, and they must be placed in context. Too much of anything — decking, paving, lighting — is too much. I once visited a private sculpture garden that had 70 pieces of museum-quality artwork, including Brancusis; it was like eating a whole chocolate cake.

Traveling as the Bartletts did certainly refines the eye, and, yes, your tastes change with age and experience.

Rose Bartlett recalls that one of their last trips together took in German gardens that they would have considered absurdly ornate in their youth. “We were just really inspired by them, and although some were over the top in their Baroque extravagance, there was just an exuberance about them.”

Sometimes, they would find a garden that had seen better days. “Maybe the maintenance wasn’t that great, maybe you didn’t like certain elements of the design, but you could find a bench or a fountain. We found that if we looked hard enough, there was something unique or inspiring.

“We felt we could always be surprised by something.”

Read past columns by Higgins at washingtonpost.com/home.

@adrian_higgins on Twitter

Article source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/a-new-compendium-of-garden-elements/2014/11/24/fd633fde-6f71-11e4-ad12-3734c461eab6_story.html

Innovative lens frame, Jurong Eco-Garden among winners for Design of the Year

SINGAPORE – Brand consultant Larry Peh, 38, architect Tan Kok Hiang, 54, and designer Peter Tay, 43, have been honoured as Designers of the Year. They received their prizes at the Istana this evening from President Tony Tan Keng Yam, patron of the annual President Design Award.

At the ceremony, an eclectic group of 11 entries also clinched Design of the Year awards. These winning designs ranged from an innovative lens frame that allows people to easily switch lens to the neatly planned ponds and streams that gird Jurong Eco-Garden.

Into its ninth edition this year, the awards were started by the DesignSingapore Council of the Ministry of Communications and Information and the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA).

Noting how three of the winning projects were architectural, URA chief executive Ng Lang said: “Our local architects have been contributing to make Singapore a tropical city in a garden by masterfully incorporating greenery into their designs. This is a trend that bodes well in creating a distinct local architecture identity.”

Article source: http://www.straitstimes.com/news/singapore/more-singapore-stories/story/innovative-lens-frame-jurong-eco-garden-among-winners-de

Local Boy Scout landscapes memorial in honor of veterans



Submitted photo
The crew is hard at work building the Amity Township Building War Memorial Site.




Amity Township’s Korean and Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial, located at the Amity Township Municipal Building, 2004 Weavertown Road, has recently been “redecorated” by a local Boy Scout for his Eagle Scout Service Project.

Christopher Ehlinger, 209 Ashford Drive, a member of Boy Scout Troop 597, Amityville, installed on Nov. 1 and 2 a stepping-stone walkway, LED lights, and five dwarf English Boxwood trees at the memorial.

Ehlinger was assisted with his service project by 13 scouts and six adults, who braved the rain and cold weather conditions each day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. to finish the landscaping in 123 hours.

The memorial is now surrounded by stone gravel, LED lights, the boxwoods, and is reached from the parking lot by the stone pathway.

A bench that was moved from the building’s entrance now provides visitors a place to sit while paying their respects.

The project began when Ehlinger contacted the township staff for project ideas.

“They said landscaping the site was discussed at a couple of meetings but was never started.”

“There aren’t a lot of people that know the memorial is there, so I thought with the LED lights, people would see the memorial [at night].”

Born on Veterans Day 17 years ago, and with more than 12 family members who have served in the Armed Forces, Ehlinger said the project was the perfect way to earn his Eagle rank and honor veterans.

“I was happy to do this project. The landscaping could bring more attention to the memorial, and it is a great way to pay my respects to the people who have served our country.”

“I come from a family of veterans,” Ehlinger said, citing one great-grandfather, both grandfathers, his father, at least two uncles, and numerous cousins who have served.

Chris is the son of Charles and Elizabeth Ehlinger.

Charles and his father served in the Air Force, and Elizabeth’s father served in the Army.

“I want to thank Don Levengood, of Levengood’s Flowers, Inc., 7652 Boyertown Pike, Douglassville, who provided his time, guidance, and landscaping paper, and how to make the path.”

“My sincere thank you to all the scouts and adults that came out, Levengood’s Flowers, the township (who bought the five dwarf English Boxwoods), and especially township Manager Charles E. Lyon for all of his help with the project details. Thank you to township Roadmaster Alistair Howell-Clarke, who delivered the stepping stones, the edging, as well as two tons of stone gravel.”

“I think the project turned out to look very nice,” Ehlinger said. “The two days we picked weren’t exactly the best weather days, but the guys that came out to help worked really hard.”

Article source: http://www.berksmontnews.com/general-news/20141119/local-boy-scout-landscapes-memorial-in-honor-of-veterans

SEPTA plans approved for adding parking near North Wales station







North Wales Plenty has changed since the last time SEPTA discussed the possibility of adding parking near its North Wales station.

More state funding has become available for transportation-related projects, the transit agency is moving ahead quickly on plans to build a parking garage near its Lansdale station — and they’ve brought back a full set of plans to add 74 new parking spaces on Beaver Street adjacent to the current station.

“SEPTA was here [in 2013] with a temporary option. We were in the middle of a budget crisis, but we understood the need for parking lot expansion at this facility,” said Taron Booker, SEPTA manager of civil engineering design.

“Our funding issues didn’t allow us to do a full design, so today I’m proud to announce that we are here to do a full design, full asphalt paving — which we didn’t have last time — and 74 new parking stalls,” he said.

The new parking lot will be located just northwest of the current station, on a parcel currently owned by SEPTA that’s bounded by the rail tracks to its south and Beaver Street to the east. Four handicapped-accessible spaces would be located closest to Beaver Street, which would be buffered by a thin row of trees from the lot, and a crosswalk would be located at the southern end of the new lot to connect to the current one.

Several water retention basins would be added to the site, which is shaped roughly like two overlapping triangles with their bases along the railroad tracks, and a thick line of trees would buffer the northeast edge of the site with a retention wall to be added to prevent flooding of the neighboring properties across a 4-foot grade change.

“This site really has no landscaping, it’s really kind of a barren area,” Booker said, so SEPTA’s objectives were to identify “the best way possible to get the most parking we can, but at the same time make sure we don’t cause any detriment to the surrounding area.”

Booker and the SEPTA design team asked borough council to approve a total of seven waivers for the project, including a parking space width of 18 feet similar to that seen at other stations in their network and recently approved for the agency’s proposed Lansdale parking garage. Other waivers include permissions for the retaining wall to be built on the property line between the lot and neighboring property, instead of requiring a setback and the necessary construction easement; waivers seeking to limit screening along the rail tracks where fencing will be added instead; permission to proceed with plans approved by a civil engineer rather than a landscape architect which SEPTA does not have on staff; and waivers regarding the bond and escrow typically set aside for similar projects but which SEPTA and its funding sources do not allow.

“The escrow account, you put up money up front to make sure you’re not going anywhere. That’s more made for developers — if you start a project, and halfway through the market stops and you leave, it’s the borough’s way of recouping the costs,” Booker said.

“SEPTA is here, and we hope we’re not going anywhere anytime soon, so we’ll be easy to find and if there is any issue you can always contact us,” he said. Continued…

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In response to questions from residents and council, Booker said prices for parking in the new spaces would be roughly $1 per day, identical to prices in the current parking across the street, a new payment kiosk would be installed to cover that lot, and traffic studies performed when the project would have been more than 130 spaces showed little impact to the surrounding area due to the commuter nature of those parking. Soil testing revealed higher than normal levels of cobalt and boron on the property, but none above levels that would require remediation, and councilman (and landscaper) Jim Cherry made suggestions about the types of trees to be used in the buffers.

Construction will likely start in March 2015 and SEPTA hopes to “be finished by Labor Day of the same year,” Booker said, and work on the lot property will have minimal impact to traffic elsewhere beyond occasional lane restrictions on Beaver Street when striping is done there.

Council unanimously approved the plans along with the waivers requested by SEPTA, and thanked the design team for refining their plans and former council member Greta Martin Washington for seeking further refinements to the initial proposal last year.

“They had some ideas, but Greta and the other council members said to SEPTA ‘It’s got to be a top-notch plan, or you’re not getting all of those waivers,’ so they went back to the drawing board and came back with a beautiful plan tonight,” said Solicitor Greg Gifford.

  • 1
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  • See Full Story

North Wales Plenty has changed since the last time SEPTA discussed the possibility of adding parking near its North Wales station.

More state funding has become available for transportation-related projects, the transit agency is moving ahead quickly on plans to build a parking garage near its Lansdale station — and they’ve brought back a full set of plans to add 74 new parking spaces on Beaver Street adjacent to the current station.

“SEPTA was here [in 2013] with a temporary option. We were in the middle of a budget crisis, but we understood the need for parking lot expansion at this facility,” said Taron Booker, SEPTA manager of civil engineering design.

“Our funding issues didn’t allow us to do a full design, so today I’m proud to announce that we are here to do a full design, full asphalt paving — which we didn’t have last time — and 74 new parking stalls,” he said.

The new parking lot will be located just northwest of the current station, on a parcel currently owned by SEPTA that’s bounded by the rail tracks to its south and Beaver Street to the east. Four handicapped-accessible spaces would be located closest to Beaver Street, which would be buffered by a thin row of trees from the lot, and a crosswalk would be located at the southern end of the new lot to connect to the current one.

Several water retention basins would be added to the site, which is shaped roughly like two overlapping triangles with their bases along the railroad tracks, and a thick line of trees would buffer the northeast edge of the site with a retention wall to be added to prevent flooding of the neighboring properties across a 4-foot grade change.

“This site really has no landscaping, it’s really kind of a barren area,” Booker said, so SEPTA’s objectives were to identify “the best way possible to get the most parking we can, but at the same time make sure we don’t cause any detriment to the surrounding area.”

Booker and the SEPTA design team asked borough council to approve a total of seven waivers for the project, including a parking space width of 18 feet similar to that seen at other stations in their network and recently approved for the agency’s proposed Lansdale parking garage. Other waivers include permissions for the retaining wall to be built on the property line between the lot and neighboring property, instead of requiring a setback and the necessary construction easement; waivers seeking to limit screening along the rail tracks where fencing will be added instead; permission to proceed with plans approved by a civil engineer rather than a landscape architect which SEPTA does not have on staff; and waivers regarding the bond and escrow typically set aside for similar projects but which SEPTA and its funding sources do not allow.

“The escrow account, you put up money up front to make sure you’re not going anywhere. That’s more made for developers — if you start a project, and halfway through the market stops and you leave, it’s the borough’s way of recouping the costs,” Booker said.

“SEPTA is here, and we hope we’re not going anywhere anytime soon, so we’ll be easy to find and if there is any issue you can always contact us,” he said.

In response to questions from residents and council, Booker said prices for parking in the new spaces would be roughly $1 per day, identical to prices in the current parking across the street, a new payment kiosk would be installed to cover that lot, and traffic studies performed when the project would have been more than 130 spaces showed little impact to the surrounding area due to the commuter nature of those parking. Soil testing revealed higher than normal levels of cobalt and boron on the property, but none above levels that would require remediation, and councilman (and landscaper) Jim Cherry made suggestions about the types of trees to be used in the buffers.

Construction will likely start in March 2015 and SEPTA hopes to “be finished by Labor Day of the same year,” Booker said, and work on the lot property will have minimal impact to traffic elsewhere beyond occasional lane restrictions on Beaver Street when striping is done there.

Council unanimously approved the plans along with the waivers requested by SEPTA, and thanked the design team for refining their plans and former council member Greta Martin Washington for seeking further refinements to the initial proposal last year.

“They had some ideas, but Greta and the other council members said to SEPTA ‘It’s got to be a top-notch plan, or you’re not getting all of those waivers,’ so they went back to the drawing board and came back with a beautiful plan tonight,” said Solicitor Greg Gifford.

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Article source: http://www.montgomerynews.com/articles/2014/11/24/north_penn_life/news/doc5473a940880ed986546697.txt

Rock ‘N Tree Farm opens in Glenford

Posted: Monday, November 24, 2014 4:36 pm

Rock ‘N Tree Farm opens in Glenford

By Bill Rockwell
Tribune Reporter

Perry County Tribune

What to do with more than 50 acres of land for the holidays? Ben and Paula Mitchell decided to open a tree farm.

The Rock N’ Tree Farm will open Black Friday in Glenford, a family business that offers holiday trees, ornaments and gift ideas. “Our family has lived on here since 1917, my dad grew up here and lived here when he died (in 2006),” Ben said. “We wanted to find something to do with the land and decided to do some research and found the best per acre usage for land like ours is for Christmas trees.”

Six years ago the family started planting trees, back then they counted about 1,000 trees, that number is now around 3,000. “This has been a great experience and something that has really pulled us together as a family unit,” Paula said. Ben’s brother and cousin have been busy weaving holiday wreaths, their daughter hand-knitting items for sale in the gift shop.

“We also have a variety of different tree species,” Ben said. “I am looking forward to this (holiday) season, everyone has put a lot of work into this project and everyone in the family has done a dandy of a job.”

Ben adds that in addition to the Christmas trees and decorations and the rocks on site that can be used for landscaping projects, tours of the farm will also be available by a horse-drawn wagon. “I enjoy mother nature and I think there will be something available here to interest everyone in the family,” Ben said.

Including history buffs.

The gift shop is a converted telegram shed that was first used at the Glenford Train Station as late as the 1940’s. “It’s an interesting building and we have tried to keep it as close to its original state as we could,” Ben said.

The Rock ‘N Tree Farm, at 725 State Route 204 in Glenford, will be open Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon until p.m. during the holiday season. Mitchell says delivery is also available to certain areas and is free for senior citizens.

Email at brockwell@perrytribune.com

on

Monday, November 24, 2014 4:36 pm.

Article source: http://www.perrydaily.com/community/article_7f9161ab-7be1-503f-ab88-4328ca65bade.html

Enjoy water fixtures all year by winterizing

Enjoy water fixtures all year by winterizing

Enjoy water fixtures all year by winterizing

In this Oct. 30, 2009 photo, hardy plants like these water lilies in the Brooklyn Botanical Garden in New York can be repositioned into deeper water to avoid potentially fatal ice buildups. Aquatic plants should be pruned or pinched off before the onset of winter. (AP Photo/Dean Fosdick)

Enjoy water fixtures all year by winterizing

Enjoy water fixtures all year by winterizing

This Nov. 10, 2014 photo shows a fountain that will be shutdown and drained before the cold weather arrives to prevent damage from ice build-ups in Langley, Wash. People living in warm climates generally don’t have to drain the pipes or pull the plug on their water fixtures in winter. (AP Photo/Dean Fosdick)



DEAN FOSDICK

Associated Press

___

Online:

Aquascape Inc. tip sheet: http://www.aquascapeinc.com/blogs/water-gardening/tips-for-fall-pond-care

You can contact Dean Fosdick at deanfosdick@netscape.net


Published: Sunday, November 23, 2014 4:00 am


Enjoy water fixtures all year by winterizing

Associated Press |


0 comments

For many people with backyard ponds, fountains and other water-garden fixtures, the arrival of cold weather means draining the pipes and pulling the plug.


But water gardens can be attractive winter gardens, too, with the right preparation and landscaping.

Turning off a garden’s water fixtures may not be necessary, depending on where you live, said Keith Folsom, president of Springdale Water Gardens in Greenville, Virginia. “Their wintertime effect is always different and attractive with the use of landscape lighting and the right plants.”

“We had an extremely cold winter here last year but it wasn’t a problem,” he said. “Pay attention and know how much water you’re using below the ice. You have to keep that flow topped off.”

Ensure that water lines and fixtures are drained if you do decide to turn them off so they won’t expand with freezing and break, Folsom said. “Running water, on the other hand, prevents icing. That’s one of the reasons I tell people to keep them running.”

Landscaping around water fixtures can mean simply adding a few evergreens for contrast against snow, or stringing some lights around the ice.

“People who live in the South will most likely keep their ponds going, and use cold and frost-tolerant landscaping for visual interest,” said Tavia Tawney, technical services manager for Aquascape Inc. in Chicago.

Tips for preparing your pond for the winter freeze-up:

— Remove debris before it can decompose. That prevents organic rot, loss of oxygen and an accumulation of toxic gases. “But the bigger problem comes if you stir it up,” Folsom said. “That can turn up bacteria that will be harmful to fish in winter.”

— Use netting. Cover the water with a screen, sweep the surface with a long-handled net or install skimmers like those used to vacuum swimming pools.

— Prune. Pinch off aquatic plants as they die back. Reposition your hardy potted water lilies into deeper water. “Tropical plants will die after a hard frost and should be removed then, or you can bring the tropicals inside the house for winter,” Tawney said.

— Stop feeding the fish. “It is very important to stop feeding the fish once water temperatures reach 50 degrees Fahrenheit, as they go into a deep slumber and do not digest the food they may eat,” Tawney said.

— Use a bubbler or tank heater if you have fish. “We use an aerator bubbler to add oxygen to the pond if the falls are turned off,” Tawney said. “Once we are continuously below 20 degrees Fahrenheit, we use a supplemental heater to help the bubbler keep a dinner-plate-size hole in the ice.”

It’s best to maintain water gardens throughout the year rather than scramble to get things done before winter sets in, she said.

“It is not advisable to do any major cleaning once the fish are ‘hibernating’ because that is very stressful for them,” she said.

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Article source: http://www.ellwoodcityledger.com/homeandgarden/enjoy-water-fixtures-all-year-by-winterizing/article_42265b5f-5a85-5dd1-9353-4173f97dd228.html

Dragonfly Farms turns to crowdfunding for expansion as an events center

By RICHARD D. OXLEY
Staff writer

KINGSTON — Dragonfly Farms has provided nursery and landscaping services for nearly 15 years at its Kingston-area location. Now, the business has aims to become a draw for weddings and other events, and is using online crowdfunding to seek the support it needs to do so.

Dragonfly Farms has a crowdfunding site on www.indiegogo.com. The website allows givers from across the Internet to donate to causes, filmmakers, inventors, and more.

Dragonfly Farms has many branches, from plant nursery to landscaping service.

“Dragonfly Farms is a nursery that is located at my house,” owner Heidi Kaster said. “I have 10 acres out there. I grow a lot from seed, I do cuttings and I work with another gentleman and we graft hard-to-find conifers. Since I do landscaping, I strive to find cool and unique things that make the gardens I design special.”

Kaster said she’s been in the landscaping business since the 1980s and started the nursery in part to supply many hard-to-find selections. She opens the nursery over the weekends from spring to fall.

Kaster spent her career in business for herself and, in business, she said, you have to adapt.

“The nursery has been slowing and I think it’s partly because people’s gardens are full,” Kaster said. “And the younger people, I’m not sure if they are into gardening as much or they are buying from Home Depot. But there are a lot of small nurseries, like myself, that are going out of business. Especially if you are at the outskirts of town.”

Kaster now has aims to grow a few more branches of the business — mainly, events. (Earlier this year, she received a conditional use permit allowing her to host up to eight events per month — themed festivals, classes, workshops, tours, wreath-making parties, fundraising activities, and a farmers market for the sale of local fruits and vegetables. Events are limited to 50 people.)

“By having a wedding or an event on Saturday, that is going to make enough money to keep the nursery open on a Friday or a Sunday,” Kaster said.

Kaster said the area is lacking in wedding locations — in all of North Kitsap, Port Gamble and Kiana Lodge are two prominent venues — and she believes she could craft quite an attraction. She has already begun working with a wedding planner to put Dragonfly on the track to becoming a wedding venue. Other interests have been piqued such as gardening groups, classes, and organizations looking for fundraiser space.

“The wedding planner I’m working with is from Seattle and she’s been looking for a place out of Seattle for years,” she said. “The Seattle side is so expensive and totally booked and she’s been looking in Kitsap for a new venue. But getting the property up to snuff will take some elbow grease, and a little money as well.”

Kaster has gone to the online sector to crowdfund additions to Dragonfly — additions such as a wood structure for outside events and a fire pit.

“The structure that we are going to build is a log structure, with huge 24-inch trees,” Kaster said. “There will be these cool light fixtures in there, made out of old pulleys, and a lot of the tables inside are going to made of old metal gears and wood.”

Kaster said artist Ray Hammar, who will be involved with the construction, loves to use recycled materials. “We will put in a burn pit, with propane. It’s made out of an old rock crusher with a patio around it,” Kaster said.

Dragonfly has a fundraising goal of $75,000 on www.indiegogo.com. So far, the nursery has raised nearly $1,000. There are different donation levels, from $10 on up to $5,000, each with an incentive. A $50 donation gets the donor a Dragonfly T-shirt. There’s a hoodie for $75. A donation of $200 will get the giver’s name burned into the side of the log structure. There are also necklaces, photography specials and, for $5,000, Hammar will spend two days with a donor, providing one-on-one art instruction and helping them to weld their own sculpture.

Kaster hopes that the community will answer her call for help. She said that she is a small business who, in turn, supports other small businesses in the area.

“It’s sad that small businesses are struggling, and people need to think about where they spend their dollar,” Kaster said. “Whether it’s at Walmart or going to downtown Poulsbo to buy Christmas presents. It’s important, and I am one of these small businesses.”

Of her proposed expansion, she said, “I think it will benefit the community in the Hansville/Kingston area,” she said.

To see Dragonfly’s Indiegogo site, visit www.indiegogo.com/projects/dragonfly-farms-events-center.

 

Article source: http://www.kingstoncommunitynews.com/business/283772121.html

Citrus events highlight garden calendar

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Article source: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/life/gardening/article/Citrus-events-highlight-garden-calendar-5915017.php