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Archives for November 20, 2014

Best Tips To Grow Dahlias In Your Garden

Winter is the season for flowers, vegetables and fruits. Flowers are in full bloom during this season. Dahlia is one of the most popular flowers grown in India during winter. But you must know how to grow dahlias at home properly. You can easily grow dahlias in pots. Before planting them in your garden, do a detailed study of this beautiful flower and the conditions that are favourable for its growth.

ALSO READ COLOURFUL PLANTS FOR WINTER GARDEN

Do you know how to plant dahlias in the garden? Boldsky presents to you a few tips to keep in mind before adding dahlias to your garden. You must know when to plant dahlias because they are a very sensitive plant.

Best Tips To Grow Dahlias In Your Garden

Cold climate: Dahlias are grown best during winters. That is when the flower blooms to the fullest and appears healthy and beautiful. But they also need a good amount of sunlight. Dahlias struggle in extreme cold.

Soil and water: Dahlias are not fussy, so you can plant them anywhere in your garden with a little care. Dahlias grow well in watery soils. But water-clogged soil is not too great for dahlias. Rainy seasons are a boon to plants. But dahlias need extra care if it’s raining, as the water must not sit in just one area!

Watering: You can grow dahlias in pots. But do not water your dahlias until they have sprouted. You can use soaker hoses to water your dahlias. Apart from that, just like any other plant, you need to water dahlias at least once or twice in a week after it has bloomed.

Sunlight: Are you wondering how to plant dahlias in your garden? If you do, then make sure that your dahlia gets sunlight in abundance, that is, at least for 6-7 hours daily. Morning sunlight is the best for dahlias.

Fertilisers: Dahlias require fertilisers that are low in nitrogen content. Make sure that you do not put too many fertilisers or compost to your dahlias. They will not bloom. This is one of the important steps that you need to know when you think on how to grow the dahlia.

READ HOW TO PROTECT DELICATE FLOWERS IN WINTER

Support: Dahlia blooms are quite heavy. So make sure there is a support system to hold them. Ensure that your dahlia grows upright and does not fall off after it is bloomed. You definitely do not want to see your dahlia go off after you grow it with care and attention. If you do not know how to plant dahlias in your garden, keep a gardener for it. It will be worth it.

Article source: http://www.boldsky.com/home-n-garden/gardening/2014/best-tips-to-grow-dahlias-in-your-garden-054117.html

Garden Tips: Bulbs and blankets

canna

canna

Cannas are just one of the bulbs that you should dig up so they’re not destroyed by winter.



Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 12:00 pm

Garden Tips: Bulbs and blankets

BY DAINA SAVAGE | Correspondent

TownNews.com

BULB BUSINESS

If you haven’t yet dug up your summer bulbs, it’s time to take up your dahlias, cannas and gladioli. Cut back the tops. It’s best to do this in the early afternoon so the surface of the bulbs can dry in the sun before you store them. 

POSTPONE THE BLANKET

Although it’s tempting to mulch your garden beds once you’ve cleaned them up, wait until we’ve had a good hard freeze. Otherwise, voles may make their home in the mulch and feast on your plant and tree roots all winter. 

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Thursday, November 20, 2014 12:00 pm.



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Garden

Article source: http://lancasteronline.com/features/garden-tips-bulbs-and-blankets/article_40173060-7030-11e4-862e-af948f4ed16d.html

Prince Harry gets advice from Prince Charles on charity garden at 2015 Chelsea …

Charles, who once admitted that he talks to plants at his Gloucestershire estate Highgrove, is advising on the content of the show garden being created for Harry’s Sentebale charity.

Last year, Charles’s favourite landscape gardener Jinny Blom created Sentebale’s Chelsea entry and ran her designs past Harry while he was serving in Afghanistan.

Her garden for the charity, which was set up by Harry in memory of his mother Princess Diana to support orphans and vulnerable children in Lesotho, was awarded a silver gilt medal by the Chelsea judges.

Sentebale’s latest designer Matt Keightley, 30, is hoping to go one better with a gold medal next May.

The centrepiece of his garden design will be a building inspired by Sentebale’s new residential facility for children with Aids/HIV that is opening in Lesotho next year. There will also be a rocky waterfall typical of the terrain of Lesotho, known as the Mountain Kingdom.

The garden, which is costing a six-figure sum, is sponsored by a charitable foundation set up by entrepreneur David Brownlow.

His spokesman Ben Rawson said: “Prince Charles has the Prince’s Foundation for Building Community, which has worked with Sentebale in Lesotho. As patrons of the two charities, both Prince Charles and Prince Harry have had input into the design of the garden. Prince Charles has a tremendous interest in gardening from the work he has done at Highgrove.”

Rawson is commercial director of Brownlow’s investment firm Havisham Group and a trustee of his David Brownlow Charitable Foundation.

Prince Charles, 66, visits Chelsea most years and Harry, 30, attending for the first time, gave his father and the Queen a guided tour of his Sentebale garden on the opening day of the event last year.

Keightley, who is based in Richmond, designed a First World War-themed garden at Chelsea this year for military charity Help for Heroes, which Harry also supports. It was awarded a silver gilt medal and the People’s Choice award.

Sentebale chief executive Cathy  Ferrier said Keightley had created “a truly inspirational garden”.

The RHS flagship show runs from May 19-23 with tickets going on sale to the public on December 1.

Article source: http://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/prince-harry-gets-advice-from-father-on-charity-garden-at-2015-chelsea-flower-show-9865755.html

THE GRADE: KHSD gets pushback on hiring police; new garden

Susan Wooden, president of a local chapter of the California School Employees Association, told the board only internal candidates should be considered for the openings.

“There are plenty of good employees in the district,” she said.

The sergeant roles, newly created positions, are part of an effort to provide a ranking structure within the KHSD police department, said district spokeswoman Lisa Krch.

Sergeants will act in absence of the chief of police. They will evaluate subordinate officers and investigate general and criminal violations.

Starting salaries for the positions are set at $5,381 a month for one year.

Wooden, at the board meeting Monday, pointed out what she said were inequities in the hiring process for the two positions.

She called law enforcement agencies outside of KHSD’s police department and found each officer had open access to a preparatory book used to inform answers to 60 of 100 questions on the sergeant’s test, she said.

KHSD officers had to pay $150 for the book, and it wasn’t available to all officers, creating an unfair advantage for external applicants, Wooden said.

She took a similar stance in support of hiring internally when the district was searching for a new superintendent earlier this year. Bryon Schaefer worked in the district for more than two decades before assuming the top administrator role Aug. 2.

KHSD similarly hires office supervisors and planning supervisors and promotes teachers, deans and assistant principals from within the district.

“We train them,” Wooden said. “They know our ways. They know our system.”

Board President Chad Vegas called it a fair claim but said he would like to know more about the role of a police sergeant before forming an opinion.

Mike Williams, another school board member, said he agrees the district should promote from within when it’s best for children.

“I’m not opposed to hiring outsiders if that’s what our system and our children need for us to do our job right,” Williams said. “But I met a lot of these officers, and I’d be surprised if we didn’t have somebody that we could (hire).”

Bryan Batey, a board member, said the district has between 18 and 20 officers on its campuses. He said it’s worth knowing if KHSD is not training its officers to be sergeants like other agencies.

There should also be some incentive for KHSD officers to apply to be sergeants such as extra points applied to their sergeant exam scores, Batey said.

He added that KHSD treating classified workers differently from certificated employees who are promoted internally is “kind of insulting.”

KHSD Police Chief Michael Collier said after the meeting Monday the hiring issue was being considered and he couldn’t comment.

The practice of hiring internally in the high school district has been controversial.

Past Superintendent Don Carter announced his retirement Jan. 6. Soon after, the five-member KHSD board announced it would only consider district employees for the role.

The board ended up considering four candidates before unanimously appointing Schaefer March 3.

Dolores Huerta, president of the Dolores Huerta Foundation, released a media statement that day.

“We are subject to the decisions of an old boys network,” she wrote.

Huerta said earlier this school year, she “absolutely” feels the same.

Camila Chavez, executive director of the Dolores Huerta Foundation, said the foundation would like to see less money spent supporting the police department and more money spent on alternative discipline programs. She said she doesn’t think the district needs two new police sergeants.

“So I’m more interested to know how many counselors have been hired, have trainings happened,” she said.

NEW SCHOOL GARDEN: Horace Mann Elementary School will use vegetables grown in a school garden students helped plant last Thursday to feed families in need in the community.

Kellogg Garden Products installed a raised-bed garden for students as part of a partnership between the soil company and the Bakersfield Blaze to increase interest and number of qualified applicants to work in nursery, soil and organic industries, Dayna Gardner, the Horace Mann principal, said.

Kellogg held a competition inviting students to submit garden designs for a chance to have a garden installed at their schools.

Two fourth-grade classes at Horace Mann submitted designs, and Silvia Towers, now a fifth-grader, won in May.

Her class also got a trip to a Bakersfield Blaze baseball game for her winning design.

STUDENTS FILL NEW SCHOOL: The Fairfax School District will have a ribbon-cutting ceremony next Monday finally celebrating the opening of a new K-6 school named Zephyr Lane Elementary.

Students in kindergarten and first grade began attending the new school Aug. 18. But a start date for students in upper grades was pushed back, Superintendent Michael Coleman said.

Kids in grades second through fourth joined at the end of October, and fifth- and sixth-graders moved in last Monday.

The $19 million campus, which includes a 3,438-square-foot administration building, a 7,049-square-foot multi-use building and a 2,431-square-foot library, sits on 14 acres.

It has three kindergarten classrooms and 28 classrooms for first through sixth grades. The school employees 29 teachers and 28 classified employees.

The campus was built for 850 students.

Article source: http://www.bakersfieldcalifornian.com/local/grade/x1147592846/THE-GRADE-KHSD-gets-pushback-on-hiring-police

Planning for pedestrian-friendly streets in Kakaako

All the construction in Kakaako will change more than just the skyline, it will also have a big impact on the roads around the area.

Click here to watch Paul Drewes’ report.

Keeping Kakaako pedestrian-friendly was the focus of a public meeting Tuesday night.

Over the next two decades, more than two dozen high or low rise towers could fill up Kakaako.

They are part of the area’s master plan, but what is still to be determined is how all those new developments will be connected to make it an urban walkable community.

Some say providing safe and pedestrian-friendly places where people can go is key.

“We need to start thinking about pedestrian infrastructure, like grade-separation and pedestrian bridges going across Ala Moana boulevard to connect makai and mauka Kakaako,” said transportation consultant Wes Frysztacki.

Pedestrian-friendly means more than just putting in sidewalks.
Instead experts believe it creates spaces that encouraging people to get out of their cars and enjoy their surroundings.

“Its not to say if you make a sidewalk out of concrete it can’t be beautiful, but it is really about the pedestrian experience. How do you create that concrete sidewalk? Does it have a zone to sit and enjoy the sun and have a bench or it is designed to be under a tree,” asked Architect Andrew Y. K. Tang.

Architects, landscape designers and residents gathered to share their ideas of what the roads of Kakaako should look like in the future. They are not only planning for public spaces but also to make sure landscaping has a form and a function on the connected streets.

“The city has to spend a lot of money fixing storm and sewer drains that get overloaded. So if you had green infrastructure, things like trees and landscaping, you wouldn’t have to spend all the money dealing with grey infrastructure. Green infrastructure will last you a longer time and it is better for the environment,” said Landscape Architect Grace Zheng.

Hawaii has already has some successful pedestrian-friendly roads like Kalakaua Avenue. In Waikiki, there is a sidewalk with an esthetically-pleasing design, enough lighting and safety features at intersections. Even though there are crowds of people there is also room for everyone to walk.

Article source: http://www.kitv.com/news/planning-for-pedestrianfriendly-streets-in-kakaako/29814348

Chamber pays tribute to Siffring Landscaping & Garden Center

It’s one of Jim Siffring’s favorite projects.

Each year at Christmas, his business decorates Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church in Howells. Ten pillars line the center of the church’s interior.

“We go in and wrap those with lighted garland and each pillar has to be identical,” Siffring said. “It takes my six guys a full day to do that. It’s one of the neatest things we do.”

Siffring has been involved in many unique projects since launching his business 19 years ago.

Now, Siffring Landscaping Garden Center LLC has been named Business of the Year for fewer than 25 employees by the Fremont Area Chamber of Commerce.

The Fremont business will among those honored during the chamber’s 2014 Annual Meeting and Business Celebration at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at Midland University’s Event Center.

Siffring, who grew up in Lincoln, moved to Grand Island after high school and was hired at a garden center for 10 days to sell Christmas trees.

“They asked me to stay on — and I did,” Siffring said.

Siffring moved to Sioux Falls, S.D., 2 1/2 years later, to manage a garden center. He was there four years before moving to Yankton, S.D. There, he managed the retail division of a garden center for 1 1/2 years. Siffring and his wife, Debra, and their family then moved to Fremont and he worked for the former Marshall Nursery in Arlington for 15 years.

“Fremont’s been our home since 1980,” he said.

After Marshall Nursery closed, Siffring opened his business in 1995.

The business has various divisions, one of which is a year-round garden center that changes throughout the seasons. In the spring, it has a full nursery yard with plants, trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and hanging baskets.

“Our growers do a great job and our staff maintains things perfectly,” Siffring said. “We also, in the spring, set up a temporary satellite location in Fremont on 23rd Street at Getzschman Plaza.”

The 90-day location is designed to be more convenient for customers, who otherwise would drive to the business at 7629 E. U.S. Highway 30.

Siffring also has a landscape division. It designs landscapes, furnishing and installing plants and hardscapes, such as patios, sidewalks and benches. Every project is different. Some are complex, others are simple, depending on the client’s needs.

“That’s our biggest division,” Siffring said, noting that the company serves about a 100-mile customer base.

For the last three years, the business has used a computer-aided design drawing system. Siffring can take a photo of a home or another area to be landscaped and with the CAD system show the customer what the project will look like upon completion.

Siffring also has a Christmas decorating division. Siffring sells and installs the lights, then takes them down and stores them after the holidays.

Crews start working the last week in October on commercial projects.

“Our goal is to have everybody decorated prior to Thanksgiving — if they want,” he said.

Some clients don’t want decorations up until after Thanksgiving. The company decorates about 100 homes and businesses.

The lights have a three-year guarantee. If something isn’t working, the customer calls Siffring.

“We are there within 24 hours or less and it will be fixed,” Siffring said.

Siffring notes the company is a family business.

“Our whole family has been involved over the years,” he said.

Jeremy Siffring grew up in the industry, having been involved in project installation since he was 16. He has overseen project installations that have required multiple years to complete. He works closely with staff to make to make sure all landscaping is completed as designed. He oversees the garden center and the temporary location in Getzschman Plaza.

Jim and Debra Siffrings’ daughter, Christal, and son, Ryan, worked at the business through high school and college. Christal has helped out on weekends during busy times thereafter. Jeremy Siffring’s children also work in the business.

Many Siffring employees have years of experience.

“We try to treat everybody like family and that’s why I think we have long-term employees,” Jim Siffring said.

Siffring praises his staff, noting that when he was off work for five weeks due to knee replacements, employees Nancy Witthuhn, the garden center manager, and Nick Adams and Joann Steffensmeier did the Christmas decorating at the U.S. 30 location. Siffring notes he has landscape crew foremen who’ve been with the company for several years.

“I don’t have to worry. They know what our expectations are,” he said.

Siffring enjoys the multifaceted aspect of his work.

“My job is very fun,” he said. “I get to do something different every day.”

For instance, one project may involve three shrubs. The next may be a $250,000 project. One recent morning, he was in Omaha for a $400,000 garden project. He then returned to Fremont for a $500 project.

The saddest aspect of Siffring’s job occurs when a customer has lost a child and wants to have a tree or bench for a memorial.

One of the most unusual occurred with a cabin that featured an indoor pool. Siffring put in palm trees that were the second largest in the state.

“The only larger ones in the state were the ones at the Henry Doorly Zoo,” he said.

Siffring was surprised by the Chamber nomination and is excited about the award.

Future plans include more growth. Siffring appreciates customers in the Fremont and surrounding area.

“They’re the ones that have allowed us to be in their yards and in their homes,” he said. “It’s fun. I get to see all the different homes and ideas and I get to create something based on what they like – so every project is different.”

Article source: http://fremonttribune.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/chamber-pays-tribute-to-siffring-landscaping-garden-center/article_9fd2e4ae-bf5e-55aa-b4bf-cc1cf9b9312b.html

Ex-Shipyard in Amsterdam Houses Shops and Offices

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Article source: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/20/business/energy-environment/ex-shipyard-in-amsterdam-houses-shops-and-offices.html

Enjoy water fixtures all year by winterizing



Associated Press

For many people with backyard ponds, fountains and other water-garden fixtures, the arrival of cold weather means draining the pipes and pulling the plug.

But water gardens can be attractive winter gardens, too, with the right preparation and landscaping.
Turning off a garden’s water fixtures may not be necessary, depending on where you live, said Keith Folsom, president of Springdale Water Gardens in Greenville, Virginia. “Their wintertime effect is always different and attractive with the use of landscape lighting and the right plants.”
“We had an extremely cold winter here last year but it wasn’t a problem,” he said. “Pay attention and know how much water you’re using below the ice. You have to keep that flow topped off.”
Ensure that water lines and fixtures are drained if you do decide to turn them off so they won’t expand with freezing and break, Folsom said. “Running water, on the other hand, prevents icing. That’s one of the reasons I tell people to keep them running.”
Landscaping around water fixtures can mean simply adding a few evergreens for contrast against snow, or stringing some lights around the ice.
“People who live in the South will most likely keep their ponds going, and use cold and frost-tolerant landscaping for visual interest,” said Tavia Tawney, technical services manager for Aquascape Inc. in Chicago.
Tips for preparing your pond for the winter freeze-up:
— Remove debris before it can decompose. That prevents organic rot, loss of oxygen and an accumulation of toxic gases. “But the bigger problem comes if you stir it up,” Folsom said. “That can turn up bacteria that will be harmful to fish in winter.”
— Use netting. Cover the water with a screen, sweep the surface with a long-handled net or install skimmers like those used to vacuum swimming pools.
— Prune. Pinch off aquatic plants as they die back. Reposition your hardy potted water lilies into deeper water. “Tropical plants will die after a hard frost and should be removed then, or you can bring the tropicals inside the house for winter,” Tawney said.
— Stop feeding the fish. “It is very important to stop feeding the fish once water temperatures reach 50 degrees Fahrenheit, as they go into a deep slumber and do not digest the food they may eat,” Tawney said.
— Use a bubbler or tank heater if you have fish. “We use an aerator bubbler to add oxygen to the pond if the falls are turned off,” Tawney said. “Once we are continuously below 20 degrees Fahrenheit, we use a supplemental heater to help the bubbler keep a dinner-plate-size hole in the ice.”
It’s best to maintain water gardens throughout the year rather than scramble to get things done before winter sets in, she said.
“It is not advisable to do any major cleaning once the fish are `hibernating’ because that is very stressful for them,” she said.
———
Online:
Aquascape Inc. tip sheet: http://www.aquascapeinc.com/blogs/water-gardening/tips-for-fall-pond-care
You can contact Dean Fosdick at deanfosdick(at)netscape.net

Article source: http://www.troyrecord.com/lifestyle/20141118/enjoy-water-fixtures-all-year-by-winterizing

What You Get for … $2000000

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Article source: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/23/realestate/what-you-get-for-2000000.html

Enjoy water features all year by winterizing

For many people with backyard ponds, fountains and other water features, the arrival of cold weather means draining the pipes and pulling the plug, but water gardens can be attractive winter gardens, too, with the right preparation and landscaping.

Turning off a garden’s water fixtures may not be necessary, depending on where you live, said Keith Folsom, president of Springdale Water Gardens in Greenville, Va.

“Their wintertime effect is always different and attractive with the use of landscape lighting and the right plants.”

Ensure that water lines and fixtures are drained if you do decide to turn them off so they won’t expand with freezing and break, Folsom said. “Running water, on the other hand, prevents icing. That’s one of the reasons I tell people to keep them running.”

Add evergreens

Landscaping around water features can mean simply adding a few evergreens for contrast against the drab browns of winter or stringing some lights around them.

“People who live in the South will most likely keep their ponds going and use cold- and frost-tolerant landscaping for visual interest,” said Tavia Tawney, technical services manager for Aquascape Inc. in Chicago.

Winterizing strategies

Here’s advice on preparing your pond for the winter:

Remove debris before it can decompose. That prevents organic rot, loss of oxygen and an accumulation of toxic gases. “But the bigger problem comes if you stir it up,” Folsom said. “That can turn up bacteria that will be harmful to fish in winter.”

Use netting. Cover the water with a screen, sweep the surface with a long-handled net or install skimmers like those used to vacuum swimming pools.

Prune. Pinch off aquatic plants as they die back. Reposition your hardy potted water lilies into deeper water. “Tropical plants will die after a hard frost and should be removed then, or you can bring the tropicals inside the house for winter,” Tawney said.

Stop feeding the fish. “It is very important to stop feeding the fish once water temperatures reach 50 F, as they go into a deep slumber and do not digest the food they may eat,” Tawney said.

Use a bubbler or tank heater if you have fish. “We use an aerator bubbler to add oxygen to the pond if the waterfalls are turned off,” Tawney said.

It’s best to maintain water gardens throughout the year rather than scramble to get things done before winter sets in, she said.

“It is not advisable to do any major cleaning once the fish are hibernating because that is very stressful for them,” she said.

The Associated Press

To learn more

Aquascape Inc. tip sheet

Article source: http://www.dallasnews.com/lifestyles/home-and-gardening/headlines/20141119-enjoy-water-features-all-year-by-winterizing.ece