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Archives for October 2014

Georgia clipping – Times

Posted: Friday, October 31, 2014 6:01 pm

Georgia clipping

Eddie Seagle

Thomasville Times-Enterprise

“I step outside and the chilly air tightens the skin on my bare arms. Summer has ended all too quickly, and some of the leaves on the trees have already started to burn with the colors of fall. Fall colors…. so bright and intense and beautiful. It’s like nature is trying to fill you up with color, to saturate you so you can stockpile it before winter turns everything muted and dreary.”

— Siobhan Vivian, Same Difference.

What a difference a few days make. Cooler temps are on the horizon, but a warming trend is likely to follow for a few days. Welcome November and enjoy the month as you go about your various activities. November is another month for playing in the yard while completing effective plantings in the landscape. The weather outside is comfortable, yet cool enough to encourage plants to transition well into their new landscape homes. Check the soil for necessary preparation and proper drainage and make the necessary adjustments before installing any new plant materials. Your landscape checklist this month should include the following items.

Azaleas: Azaleas can bloom from late winter into early summer, depending on type. To extend the season, plant early-, mid-, and late-season bloomers in the landscape. During the selection process, give consideration to flower color, projected mature size of adult plants, and their season of bloom. For example, southern Indian hybrids and Glenn Dale hybrids are medium to tall shrubs, sometimes growing 8-12 feet tall. Gumpo azaleas seldom exceed three feet in height, but may have a spread of five feet or more. Southern Indian hybrids and Glenn Dale hybrids bloom in early to mid-spring, while Gumpos make their show in May and June. Always make those choices giving successive bloom dates, thus extending the blooming season.

Also, the “Red Ruffles” Rutherford hybrid is early-blooming and grows to 2-4 feet tall and needs mid-day shade. The “George Lindley Taber” southern Indica hybrid offers midseason blooms and reaches 4-6 feet in height. The “Sherwood Red” and “Coral Bells” Kurume hybrids bloom early to mid-season bloom and get 2-4 feet tall. The Spider Azalea is very rare and blooms early to mid-season and grows 4-6 feet tall. The “Gumpo Pink” Satsuki hybrid blooms late season with 1-2 feet in height. The “Pride of Mobile” southern Indica hybrid is a mid-season bloomer and reaches 4-6 feet in height. In addition, always consider using the native azaleas which are a good fit for this area.

Dahlias: After frost has killed the tops of dahlias, cut back the stalks to about three inches above the ground level. A week later, dig the tubers and dry them in the sun for a few days. After drying, use a fungicide, and store in mesh bags in a cool, dry environment for their winter home. Before planting next spring, divide each clump to tubers containing a growth bud and discard the central portion of the plant.

Equipment: Sprinklers and hoses can be destroyed if they contain water when freezing temperatures arrive. Drain and properly store them in a protected area to insure full utilization next spring. Properly service your power equipment and mowers in preparation for winter storage.

Hardscapes: The weather still promotes the development of your ideas for sidewalks, courtyards, patios, gazebos, etc. Such areas can become most enjoyable and useful as one season passes to the next one.

Houseplants: Plants brought outside for the summer need extra care while they acclimate and re-adjust to the indoors where light and air flow will be very critical. Acclimate them from their outdoor home to their new indoor home by parking them in transition setting (carport or garage) for a couple of weeks. Once inside, check their placement to insure their safety from the potential harmful air flow of heating ducts and exterior doorways. Also, be sure they are receiving sufficient lighting. Dust off large-leaved plants, such as saddle leaf philodendron, to prevent the build-up of dust and grime on the leaf surface which will interfere with effective photosynthesis and ultimately, plant health.

Mulch: Replinish mulch in flower beds and around shrubs and trees. Add enough pine straw, pine bark, or other organic material to make a layer 3 to 4 inches thick. Consider removing the old mulch to improve air flow and exchange between soil and atmosphere and to minimize disease and insect habitats.

Nursery stock: New shipments of ornamentals should continue to arrive at local nurseries since the fall planting season has begun. Current inventories offer a larger number of choices. Take the time to peruse local inventories and note the choices available. Read all about your choices on the plant label and also look them up on the internet. Learn as much as you can about the plants you choose before you purchase them. With several months to become established, when planted and maintained properly, the plants should be very healthy in the spring.

Outdoor containers: Keep empty pots, urns and other clay or ceramic containers turned upside down so that water will not collect in them and freeze, causing breakage. If containers are too large to be moved, you can still keep them from collecting water and add some landscape interest in the process. Just insert nursery stock, pot and all, in the containers for the season. Fill in around the potted plant with wood chips or other mulching material to insulate the roots against freezing.

Propagation: Take cuttings from deciduous plants such as crape myrtle, forsythia, spirea, and flowering quince for immediate propagation.

Transplanting: Begin moving shrubs that were root pruned earlier in the late summer in preparation for transplanting. Have new planting holes prepared before actually digging the subject plant to insure ease of process effectiveness and minimal damage to the plant. Avoid transplanting on windy days so that roots will not be exposed to excessive drying winds. After transplanting, selectively prune about one-third of the plant to compensate for root damage. Water thoroughly, and apply a mulch of pine straw, wood chips, or shredded bark. Water regularly during dry periods to encourage rapid re-establishment of the plants.

Trees: If growing trees is your forte, consider the fastest growing trees such as weeping willow, Cleveland pear, lacebark elm, or golden raintree. For winter deciduous beauty, use the ginkgo (male), dogwood, maple, river birch or sweetgum (male). And, for winter evergreen attraction, use sweet bay, southern magnolia, or cherry laurel.

As you further plan and install your landscaping this season, continue enjoy the fall color and think in terms of sustainability, maintenance, and curb appeal. Also, take measures to protect your furry friends (pets) – do not leave them out at night in the colder temperatures as the month passes. And, as always, remember to feed and water the birds!

“All men are like grass, and all their glory is like the flowers of the field; the grass withers and the flowers fall, but the word of the Lord stands forever.” 1 Peter 1 24-25.

Seagle is a Sustainability Associate, Golf Environment Organization (Scotland), Agronomist and Horticulturalist, CSI: Seagle (Consulting Services International), Professor Emeritus and Honorary Alumnus, Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, and Associate Editor of The Golf Course, International Journal of Golf Science. Direct inquiries to eddie@csiseagle.com.


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Friday, October 31, 2014 6:01 pm.

Article source: http://www.timesenterprise.com/news/local_news/georgia-clipping/article_7e0f7ee0-6149-11e4-91cd-ab99e592d5e1.html

When One Spouse Retires Before the Other

As a recent retiree, Carolyn Prosak has had plenty of time to put together a to-do list for the ranch home she shares with her husband, Victor, in San Jose, Calif. Her ambitious agenda matches her energetic personality: Get the house power-washed and the trim painted. Re-landscape the backyard. “Seniorize” the bathrooms by widening the doorways. Repave the driveway and redo the guest room to make space for her many hobbies.

See Also: SLIDE SHOW: 8 Ways Baby-Boomers Are Reinventing Retirement

Victor, who works full-time supervising the landscaping for a property-management company, has other ideas. His order of business: Replace the roof before tackling the trim and the power-wash, and hold off on major landscaping until he retires himself, some five years hence. After poring over the list together, “we’ve reached compromises and set priorities,” says Victor, 65. And because Carolyn, 66, is at home, “I can lay the groundwork,” she says. “I see that as my job.”

The Prosaks are among a growing number of couples who are taking separate paths into retirement. For some, job loss or disability has forced the decision; for others, age disparity (men are three years older than their wives, on average) has played a role. The closing gap in earning power is another factor, says Richard Johnson, director of the program on retirement policy at the Urban Institute, an independent research group. As women bring home bigger paychecks, “we’re seeing more of them staying in the labor force after their husbands retire.”

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Staggering your retirement dates has its benefits. “One is that each partner can retire at the age that works best for his or her career,” says Johnson — say, to get the full value of a pension. The one-two approach also allows the retired spouse to take stock and prepare for when both are out of the workforce. And watching one spouse make the transition to retired life can help the other spouse navigate those waters when the time comes.

Retiring separately also involves challenges, including negotiating financial and personal priorities and adapting to new roles. All that can be tricky, given that about one-third of couples disagree about how they will spend their time in retirement, according to a 2013 Fidelity study. Better to hash out issues sooner rather than later, says John Sweeney, executive vice-president of retirement and investing strategies at Fidelity. “It’s important to be aligned in how you want to achieve your goals.”

Smoothing the transition

Carolyn Prosak didn’t choose to retire. She loved her job as a health educator on a research study at the Stanford University School of Medicine. But by July 2013, “it was pretty clear that the study was going to end and that we wouldn’t get funding for another version being considered,” she says. In November, she learned that she would be laid off after the first of the year. Rather than look for another job right away, Prosak retired.

Although the decision to retire was made for her, she was lucky in several respects. Having worked at Stanford for 16 years, she was eligible for retirement benefits, and she was able to use up her vacation time before officially leaving the job. That gave her several months, from January to March, to map out her future while still bringing in a paycheck.

One issue she didn’t have to worry about: health insurance. At 65, she qualified for Medicare and took Part A, which covers inpatient care at no premium. She now has retiree health coverage, an increasingly rare benefit. Stanford subsidizes the cost of a Medicare Advantage plan through Kaiser Permanente. An HMO, the plan provides Medicare benefits and other health services. Had she not had access to retiree coverage, she could have signed up with Victor’s employer health plan, albeit for a stiff price, or picked up Medicare supplemental coverage on her own.

Carolyn used her first weeks off the job to have elective surgery. While recuperating, she took advantage of another Stanford bennie: retirement and job coaching. She enrolled in online courses to help her identify her interests and structure her free time. A registered dietitian, she hopes eventually to return to work part-time. She also took on-site classes to assess her skills, develop her LinkedIn profile and investigate new career opportunities. Like many new retirees, “I feel guilty that I’m not working. I’ve worked all my life,” she says.

Tweaking the budget

The Prosaks weren’t completely blindsided by Carolyn’s retirement. Knowing that her job was uncertain, they amped up their preparations, including contributing the max to her employer retirement account ($23,000, which included the $5,500 in catch-up contributions she was entitled to make because she was over 50). And they tailored their expenses to fit Victor’s salary. “We figured that if we couldn’t live on Victor’s income, we should know it now,” says Carolyn.

The exercise was made easier thanks to the Prosaks’ conservative approach to finances. “They are frugal and have always been savers, so in that sense they’ve been planning,” says Anne Chernish, a certified financial planner in Ithaca, N.Y., and Carolyn’s longtime friend, who has helped the couple with their finances. The Prosaks paid off their mortgage a few years ago and have no debt except for a small amount on their home equity line of credit.

Article source: http://www.kiplinger.com/article/retirement/T047-C000-S002-when-one-spouse-retires-before-the-other.html

Westdale redevelopment on track


CEDAR RAPIDS — Driving around large earth movers and dump trucks, John Frew gazed out of his rental car at a flurry of construction and demolition activity Wednesday afternoon at Westdale Mall.

“This is a 14-phase project stretching out over the next two years,” said Frew, president of Frew Development Group in Denver, Colo., which is overseeing a $90 million redevelopment of the property.

“The bulk of the work that people will see will occur next year,” Frew said. “The first phase will take care of all horizontal construction — the underground utilities, light poles, parking lot, landscaping, demolition of the mall and repair of the three buildings (JCPenney, Younkers and the former Von Maur department store) that will remain.

“The second phase will involve all the vertical construction of new buildings over the next five or six years.”

On a driving tour of the 72-acre site, Frew outlined what needed to happen before new buildings can begin to rise as early as next month.

“The work that people see out along Edgewood Road involves preparation of the initial pads as well as the underground utilities,” he noted. “Over the years since the mall was built, all the utilities followed Edgewood Road, which is a city street as opposed to Williams Boulevard, which is a state highway.”

Frew said stormwater will be channeled through underground pipes to a culvert that will take it under Edgewood Road SW to a detention basin between Farmers State Bank and Wendy’s. The stormwater detention basin along Wiley Boulevard will be deepened, and the parking lot will be raised to level it and eliminate pounding that has occurred after a heavy rain.

“All of the underground stormwater changes will allow us to fill in detention basins along Edgewood Road and at the corner with 29th Street SW,” Frew explained.

Two buildings will stand at the corner.

The underground utilities and site preparation work for the Chick-fil-A restaurant and U.S. Bank building have been completed. He said construction of the two buildings could begin as early as next month.

“We have poured the entry off Edgewood Road for a new ring road,” Frew said. “There will be three roads that will go into mall. One will run past Younkers and do a big loop back to the ring road. Another road will angle through the middle of what has been the center of the mall.

“The third road will curve around J.C. Penney and into the remainder of the ring road.”

Frew said the parking lot next to the mall on the Edgewood Road side is being lowered by about 15 to 17 feet to bring it level with the ring road.

“We’re moving a massive amount of dirt and using it to fill in the detention basins,” he said. “When Westdale was built, that side of the property was raised to create second-floor entrances to the mall and the anchor stores.”

Frew said the former mall entrances to the three anchor buildings will be sealed for the winter. The remainder of the mall will be demolished by Dec. 31.

“Next spring, we will complete repairs to the JCPenney, Younkers and former Von Maur buildings,” Frew said. “The JCPenney building has been designed for a whole new look with two new entrances.

“J.C. Penney is completely redoing the inside of its store with a scheduled completion of Aug. 1, 2015, for a back-to-school promotion.”

Frew recalled two near misses in efforts to lease the vacant Von Maur building.

“We spent a long time working with Ann Lipsky (president of Smulekoff’s Home Store) and her group to get Smulekoff’s out here,” he said. “We really wish we could have Smulekoff’s here, but she made a good decision.”

Smulekoff’s will close its downtown store Nov. 28, and Lipsky has accepted a $4.7 million offer from the city for the building.

Frew said Seattle-based Nordstrom, which operates a fulfillment center in southwest Cedar Rapids, came close to leasing the top floor of the Von Maur building for a similar facility.

“Nordstrom bought a company called the Trunk Club for $240 million,” Frew said. “Cedar Rapids was an option for a fulfillment center along with Chicago and Philadelphia.

“Just last week the company decided to stay in Chicago. The fulfillment center would have created 400 jobs.”

Lisa Rowe, vice president of Frew Development Group and Westdale general manager, expressed confidence that a tenant for the Von Maur building will be announced soon.

“We’ve had several meetings with a national retailer that would be new to the market for 60,000-square-feet of that space,” Rowe said. “That would be all of the second floor and part of the first floor.”

Frew said the developer that purchased four of the seven development pads along Edgewood Road plans to construct 25,000-square-foot “junior anchor” buildings for multiple tenants.

Plans for a hotel and senior housing remain on track, according to Frew.

“We will have a five-story condo building near JCPenney,” he said. “The first floor facing Edgewood Road will be retail, the second floor will be parking and the top three floors will be living quarters.”

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Article source: http://thegazette.com/subject/news/westdale-redevelopment-on-track-20141031

Secret gardens planted by Syrian refugees in Jordan



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Mostly we hear stories of pain and tragedy from Syrian refugee camps. But the Za’atari Syrian refugee camp in Jordan, a place where Green Prophet’s Laurie Balbo is knitting together and flying hope, there are new sprigs of hope.

The non-profit organization Save the Children is teaching some of the camp’s 800,000 refugees how to garden. The group is giving the Syrian refugees who have fled their homes during the civil war in Syria to Jordan, lessons on landscaping and gardening.



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“Gardening allowed them to make something with their hands, and gave them a sense of accomplishment. We have seen an incredible change in them,” said Mohammad Abu Farah, the gardening teacher from Save the Children.



Wardahs niece plays with the families ducks


Scroll down to see all the inspiring photos taken from Save the Children. Giving people the tools to be self-sufficient is not only good for political refugees. One day in the not so distant future climate refugees may be also facing the same questions on how to be self-sufficient. Urban farming, hydroponics, aquaponics, and permaculture are great things every child needs to learn at school and apply on the home front, whether one is struggling for survival or is privileged to be able to buy food from the grocery store.



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One question though for Save the Children: there are winter rains to sustain the gardens in Jordan in the upcoming months. What will happen to the water-parched refugees come spring and summer when water from Jordan is limited? Will there be plans for irrigation, greywater reuse?

All images via Save the Children

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Karin Kloosterman

Article source: http://www.greenprophet.com/2014/10/secret-gardens-planted-by-syrian-refugees-in-jordan/

Trowel & Glove: Marin garden calendar for the week of Nov. 1, 2014

Click photo to enlarge

Marin

Edible gardens workshop: Marin Master Gardeners present “Water-Wise Edible Gardening.” 11 a.m. Nov. 8. Free. Novato Library. 1720 Novato Blvd., Novato. Call 473-2050 or go to www.marinlibrary.org.

‘GardenSmart’ workshop: Alameda County Master Composter and Bay-Friendly Qualified Landscape Professional Lori Caldwell leads “Composting 101” at 3 p.m. Nov. 1. Free. Gary Bartl of Marin Master Gardeners leads “About Succulents” at 11 a.m. Nov. 8. Free. Creekside Room at Mill Valley Public Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave. in Mill Valley. Call 389-4292 or go to www.millvalleylibrary.org.

Gardening volunteers: The Novato Independent Elders Program seeks volunteers to help Novato seniors with their overgrown yards Tuesday mornings or Thursday afternoons. Call 899-8296.

Nursery volunteers: Volunteers are sought to help in Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy nurseries from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesdays at Tennessee Valley, 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays, or 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays at Muir Beach, 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays in the Marin Headlands. Call 561-3077 or go to www.parksconservancy.org/get-involved/volunteer.

Nursery days: The SPAWN (Salmon Protection and Watershed Network) native plant nursery days are from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fridays and weekends. Call 663-8590, ext. 114, or email preston@tirn.net to register and for directions. Go to www.spawnusa.org for more information.

Garden visits: Marin Master Gardeners and the Marin Municipal Water District offer free residential Bay-Friendly Garden Walks to MMWD customers. The year-round service helps homeowners identify water-saving opportunities and soil conservation techniques for their landscaping. Call 473-4204 to request a visit to your garden.

Garden volunteers: Marin Open Garden Project (MOGP) volunteers are available to help Marin residents glean excess fruit from their trees for donations to local organizations serving people in need and to build raised beds to start vegetable gardens through the MicroGardens program. MGOP also offers a garden tool lending library. Go to www.opengardenproject.org or email contact@opengardenproject.org.

Harvesting volunteers: The Marin Organic Glean Team seeks volunteers to harvest extras from the fields at various farms for the organic school lunch and gleaning program. Call 663-9667 or go to www.marinorganic.org.

San Francisco

Botanical garden: The San Francisco Botanical Garden Society, at Ninth Avenue and Lincoln Way in Golden Gate Park, offers several ongoing events. $7; free to San Francisco residents, members and school groups. Call 661-1316 or go to www.sfbotanicalgarden.org. Free docent tours leave from the Strybing Bookstore near the main gate at 1:30 p.m. weekdays, 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. weekends; and from the north entrance at 2 p.m. Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. Groups of 10 or more can call ahead for special-focus tours.

Floral palace: The Conservatory of Flowers, at 100 John F. Kennedy Drive in Golden Gate Park, displays permanent galleries of tropical plant species as well as changing special exhibits from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. $2 to $8. Call 831-2090 or go to www.conservatoryofflowers.org.

Around the Bay

Landscape garden: Cornerstone Gardens is a permanent, gallery-style garden featuring walk-through installations by international landscape designers on nine acres at 23570 Highway 121 in Sonoma. Free. Call 707-933-3010 or go to www.cornerstonegardens.com.

Rose ranch: Garden Valley Ranch rose garden at 498 Pepper Road in Petaluma is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Self-guided and group tours are available. $2 to $10. Call 707-795-0919 or go to www.gardenvalley.com.

Burbank’s home: The Luther Burbank Home at Santa Rosa and Sonoma avenues in Santa Rosa has docent-led tours of the greenhouse and a portion of the gardens every half hour from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. $7. Call 707-524-5445.

Olive ranch: McEvoy Ranch at 5935 Red Hill Road in Petaluma offers tips on planting olive trees and has olive trees for sale by appointment. Olive milling available November and December. Call 707-769-4123 or go to www.mcevoyranch.com.

Garden volunteers: Wednesdays are volunteer days from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Occidental Arts and Ecology Center at 15290 Coleman Valley Road in Occidental. The center’s organic nursery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends through Nov. 2. Call 707-874-1557, ext. 201, or go to www.oaec.org.

Botanical garden: Quarryhill Botanical Garden at 12841 Sonoma Highway in Glen Ellen covers 61 acres and showcases a large selection of scientifically documented wild source temperate Asian plants. The garden is open for self-guided tours from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. $5 to $10. Call 707-996-3166 or go to www.quarryhillbg.org.

The Trowel Glove Calendar appears Saturdays. Send high-resolution jpg photo attachments and details about your event to calendar@marinij.com or mail to Home and Garden Calendar/Lifestyles, Marin Independent Journal, 4000 Civic Center Drive, Suite 301, San Rafael, CA 94903. Items should be sent two weeks in advance. Photos should be a minimum of 2 megabytes and include caption information. Include a daytime phone number on your release.

Article source: http://www.marinij.com/homeandgarden/ci_26838795/trowel-glove-marin-garden-calendar-week-nov-1

PJ Bremier’s Fine Living: Landscape book features beautiful gardens made for …

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If you dream of giving your garden a facelift this spring, you may be interested in a new book that focuses solely on creating a beautiful and affordable Marin garden.

“Marin Landscape Design” ($39.95), authored by San Rafael landscape designer and builder Dane E. Rose of Mystical Landscapes, is a great look-book with minimal text.

It was conceived as a companion to his more text-heavy book, “Successfully Landscaping Your Marin Home” ($20) published a few years ago.

You don’t need to have both books to benefit from this one, however. It showcases more than 600 photographs of his work or examples of good landscape features that he’s photographed in his travels throughout Marin.

“If readers want to add a fence, they can turn to the fence chapter and see lots of examples that they can use or modify,” he says.

The same is true for other design features.

Rose, who has worked on gardens here for 22 years, specializes in doing one project at a time, spends a lot of time with his clients.

It was though this close client relationship that he realized how helpful it would be to have a book that spelled everything, such as basic design principles, project prices and permitting.

“As a designer, I would have to lug around six or more different books to show my clients, he says. Now, he just gives each one a copy of his book.

Coffee-table books generally don’t spell out the various costs of a photographed garden, either.

“Most people have no idea how much a garden costs,” he says. “If someone shows me a picture, I can tell them that’s a $30,000 garden or a $100,000 garden if I replicated it.”

By including costs in his book he hopes readers become better informed, the design process is elevated and the landscape process is less stressful.

“This book is about nuts-and-bolts,” he says. “It’s not plant encyclopedia and doesn’t have the poetic narrative that is normal coffee-table book fare.”

The first half of his new book is divided into 16 chapters, including walls, fences and hedges, sheds and garage doors, mailboxes and sheds, trees, rocks, planters and water features, steps and paving.

A chapter of Great Plants is an assemblage of more than 70 plants that are drought-, freeze- and deer-resistant, water-efficient, provide year-round interest and work well in our county.

“It’s not a long list because I didn’t want people to be overwhelmed by it,” he says. “There may be situations where a plant won’t work in a particular garden but it’s a starting point.”

As this is a print-on-demand book, Rose can easily update future editions. In the latest, he’s added 40 pictures of American Soil products along with current rough prices to save readers time.

The final portion of the book focuses on 10 of his Marin landscape projects.

“I hope this chapter gives readers a sense of how important they are in the process,” he says. “A lot of clients make the mistake of thinking that a professional can tell them why to like or what they should do, but a client should own this part.”

Rose believes that a good professional can help clients accomplish what they want in a garden in the most cost-efficient, attractive, and functional way.

“But, each garden should reflect the owner, not the professional,” he notes.

He encourages interested Marin residents to join him in the Marin Landscape Design Meetups to get even more ideas.

The last meet-up was a wine-and-cheese garden tour of a Marin landscape he designed.

“I talked about the garden, why is was designed this way, how much it cost, and how much it takes to maintain, all things a homeowner needs to know.”

Copies of “Marin Landscape Design” are available at the following San Rafael locations: American Soil, Copperfield’s, West End Nursery, United Market Nursery and Andy’s Market; Ace Hardware in Fairfax, Book Passage in Corte Madera and Sunnyside Nursery in San Anselmo. It can also be ordered through Amazon.

For more information, call 455-9161 or go to mysticallandscapes.com.

PJ Bremier writes on home, garden, design and entertaining topics every Saturday and also on her blog at DesignSwirl.co. She may be contacted at P.O. Box 412, Kentfield 94914, or at pj@pjbremier.com.

Article source: http://www.marinij.com/homeandgarden/ci_26838816/pj-bremiers-fine-living-landscape-book-features-beautiful

Gardening tips for growing jacaranda

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IT’S TIME TO …

Kill bindiis

Quick, before it sets seed and turns summer lawns into a mine field. Look for bindii-specific weedkillers, or try organic treatments such as pine oil, or hard physical labour with a weeder.

Enjoy gardenias

Pick them to enjoy the fragrance inside, and to keep the shrub compact. 

Plant for Alzheimer’s

“Memory” is a new fragrant white dianthus. For every plant sold, $1 goes to Alzheimer’s Australia Dementia Research Foundation.

See The Briars

This grand, heritage-listed property has a complementary formal garden with fabulous mature jacarandas. Open November 8 and 9, 14 Woonona Avenue South, Wahroonga, opengarden.org.au.


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Article source: http://www.watoday.com.au/entertainment/gardening-tips-for-growing-jacaranda-20141024-11b1ux.html

Midday Fix: Fall garden clean up tips from Tu Bloom – WGN

Tu Bloom

www.tubloom.com

Tu’s Tips:

Before the ground gets too solid to work in from the cold temperatures, clean/remove all annuals, weeds, and debris. Be thorough with this process, because this cleanup is a critical part of winterization regardless if it is a vegetable or flower garden. Any plant material left in the soil can harbor unwanted pests and disease that can carry over to the next growing season in your garden. Diseases/pests alike can all overwinter if given the proper environment where they incubate and lie waiting to come out of dormancy once the soil starts to warm up in the spring. Be vigilant… when you think you’re done… do a once over – toss/turn the soil a little bit to see if any additional garden waste/debris was left hiding in all the nooks of the garden.

The second most important part of the winterization process is mulch/protecting various areas of (if not the entire) garden. A blanket of new mulch over your perennials and various other garden areas will help in many ways; it conserves moisture, inhibits weeds, and moderates soil temperature (you don’t get those really hard freezes and really high heat spikes). Additionally, because the temperature of the soil is consistently moderated where you’ve mulched, you will typically have both an easier and earlier access to work in that soil in early spring.

WHEN TO MULCH
While there are notable reasons why some people wait until after a hard frost to mulch, the decision is completely up to you if you want to mulch immediately after the clean/removal process. If your garden areas are known to have pests such as mice, etc., you may want to hold off until after a hard frost to mulch, as they have been known to burrow and create nests in warm mulch that is laid out in early fall.

WHAT MULCH TYPE
Don’t rush out to the store and grab mulch right away. Did you know that leaves falling from trees during the autumn season are an invaluable asset to our gardens? Practice sustainable gardening while helping to reduce waste, costs and labor for yourself.

LEAVES
Leaves help improve soil in many different ways as they begin to decompose into what is commonly referred to as leaf mold:
When mixed into poor soil, it improves its texture
The coarse structure of leaves creates air spaces in the soil, making it easier for roots to penetrate during active growth.
As the leaves continue to decompose, they improve the soil’s fertility. Earthworms especially enjoy dining on particles of leaves that they digest leaving nutrient rich castings all throughout the garden.
Leaf molds integrated into soil helps increase moisture absorption and retains longer it for plants. Absorbing rain equals to reducing wasteful runoff too.

Article source: http://wgntv.com/2014/10/31/midday-fix-fall-garden-clean-up-tips-from-tu-bloom/

Library hosts interior design workshop

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Professional Interior Designer Jacqui Palatnik introduced the latest trends in the world of Interior Design on Thursday, October 23rd at the Garden City Public Library.
Professional Interior Designer Jacqui Palatnik introduced the latest trends in the world of Interior Design on Thursday, October 23rd at the Garden City Public Library.

Jacqui Palatnik attended the High Point Furniture Market each year and shared the trends in color, fabrics, and furniture design at the Library's Interior Design Workshop on October 23rd. There were material samples as well as a PowerPoint presentation and handouts.
Jacqui Palatnik attended the High Point Furniture Market each year and shared the trends in color, fabrics, and furniture design at the Library’s Interior Design Workshop on October 23rd. There were material samples as well as a PowerPoint presentation and handouts.

Designer Jacqui Palatnik answered participants' decorating questions at the Library's Interior Design Workshop. Garden City Public Library 60 Seventh St. Garden City, NY 11530 516-742-8405 www.gardencitypl.org
Designer Jacqui Palatnik answered participants’ decorating questions at the Library’s Interior Design Workshop. Garden City Public Library 60 Seventh St. Garden City, NY 11530 516-742-8405 www.gardencitypl.org

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Article source: http://www.gcnews.com/news/2014-10-31/Community/Library_hosts_interior_design_workshop.html

New books: The Gardener’s Garden and Garden Design Close Up celebrate …

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Reuss takes gardens – the outdoor space attached to a penthouse in Hanover, for instance – and distils critical “design ingredients”. So for the German courtyard (almost identical in appearance to the penthouse interior, save for the carpet being grass and the sculpture being a collection of multi-stemmed Amelanchier lamarckii in futuristic white planters) she talks about simplicity, humour, limited colour, allegory and unity.

It doesn’t make it into the German section of The Gardener’s Garden, however, and it is telling just how little crossover between the two books there is. While both have some historic spaces in common (the Loire Valley’s Chateau de Villandry, say, or Kyoto’s Ryoan-ji) and both describe the off-beat offerings of Derek Jarman on flat shingle spit in Kent and Jacques Majorelle against a backdrop of ultramarine in Marrakesh, there are whole sweeps of gardens that each book has on its own.

It’s a sign of both how much there is to choose from, and how subjective any final selection must be. While The Gardener’s Garden entries were nominated by a team of consultants around the world, Reuss chose hers with an eye to presenting a “wide range of styles and situations”. 

Diversity – both geographically and historically – is central to both texts though with one of the key differences being in how the variation is presented. Reuss divides her book into thematic chapters, with the one titled “Art”, for instance, including an entirely fake part-French-Renaissance-part-Japanese Zen affair on the roof of an American office building with no water source, no maintenance provision and a negligible weight-loading capacity (thank you, Martha Schwartz.)

The Gardener’s Garden, however, is structured by locale. Discussion of the great piles of stones and statuesque indigenous plants that painter Wendy Vincent and sculptor Geoffrey Armstrong have been amassing in a humid ravine an hour’s drive from Johannesburg, follows a profile of the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden in Cape Town.

That book kicks off, though, with Australia and with 12 gardens selected by Victorians Richard Aitken and Christine Reid. Eight of the landscapes are in Victoria, including both contemporary – the Australian Garden at the Royal Botanic Gardens Cranbourne, Fiona Brockhoff’s in Sorrento and Phillip Johnson’s in Olinda – and historic, with both William Guilfoyle and Edna Walling represented.

Reuss, who lives in London, mentions none of these but describes another two Australian gardens in her text – both roof gardens. There is the living roof at the Burnley Campus of the University of Melbourne (the hot-red hard landscaping means it is in the “colour” chapter) and one 29 floors up in Sydney complete with  a hot tub, fountain, pond, lawn and box hedging (it is in the “Lifestyle” section.)

But for Australian readers who can actually visit many of these gardens, the pleasure in these books is sampling some of the minutiae of what’s happening elsewhere.

 The Gardener’s Garden, Phaidon Press, $95; Garden Design Close Up by Emma Reuss, Thames Hudson, $49.99

PLOT LINES

Grasslands

The vulnerability of indigenous grasslands has been a subject of much discussion and it seems even those created as CBD art-installations aren’t immune from the pressures of modern life. Linda Tegg’s field of 10,000 local plants was  less than two weeks old  when a large swath of it was moved aside to park a couple of cars, lay down carpet and install a promotional structure in front of the State Library of Victoria.

John Delpratt, an honorary fellow in horticulture at Burnley who helped grow and install the plants, says that while the promotional disruption was only temporary it was impossible to return the installation to its original state.  He says the treatment of the Grasslands exhibit, which is in place until November 23, is indicative of the sort of responses some people have to what is seen as “natural vegetation”.

Open Gardens

An eclectic garden at 4 Crimea Close, Rowville, is filled with cuttings, self-sown plants, gifts and found items and is one of eight gardens open this weekend. Others are in Balnarring, Panton Hill, Athlone, Lardner, Gol Gol and Swan Hill. Go to opengarden.org.au for more information.

Exhibition

More than 140 botanical works by artists from around Australia are included in the The Art of Botanical Illustration exhibition organised by the Friends of the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne. The works were selected from 300 submissions, by a panel comprising an artist and a botanist, and will  be on show until November 9 at Domain House, Dallas Brooks Drive, Melbourne, 10am to 4pm weekdays, 10am to 6pm weekends, 10am to 4pm.

Book

The geographically and botanically diverse East Gippsland contains more than 200 orchid species and these have all been detailed in a comprehensive field guide to be launched next week. Members of the Bairnsdale District Field Naturalists Club have been monitoring the region’s orchids (mostly terrestrial but some lithophytes that grow on rock) for decades and have now produced a lengthy guide, which includes descriptions and photographs of each species. Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne senior conservation botanist Neville Walsh will launch Orchids of East Gippsland – A Field Guide at the Bairnsdale library on Friday evening. Go to bairnsdalefieldnaturalists.com.au for more information and details about where to get the guide, which costs $35 or $40 with CD.


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Article source: http://www.watoday.com.au/entertainment/new-books-the-gardeners-garden-and-garden-design-close-up-celebrate-hundreds-of-horticultural-endeavours-20141027-11c9zl.html