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Archives for September 10, 2014

Panel OKs Lyndale and Hennepin rehab plans

While a plan to remove lanes on Hennepin and Lyndale avenues in Minneapolis moves forward, at least one neighbor — the Basilica of St. Mary — remains concerned that reducing space for vehicles will exacerbate congestion on the busy corridor linking downtown Minneapolis to the Uptown neighborhood.

The Minneapolis City Council’s Transportation and Public Works Committee on Tuesday unanimously approved initial designs for a $9 million overhaul of the corridor between Dunwoody Boulevard and Franklin Avenue.

The area is near some of the region’s most popular cultural amenities including the Walker Art Center, Loring Park and the Basilica of St. Mary. Plans call for removing one northbound and one southbound lane to help improve traffic flow and to implement other designs to make the area friendlier to bicyclists and pedestrians.

A task force of community stakeholders including the Walker Art Center, the Lowry Hill Neighborhood Association, Citizens for a Loring Park Community and the Downtown Council endorsed the changes. But representatives from the basilica are concerned that reducing lanes will not improve travel times in the corridor for vehicles — the main mode of transportation for its congregation. The church got nearly 500 signatures on a petition to try to get the panel to delay its vote on the project.

The basilica is actually farther north of the project’s boundary at Dunwoody Boulevard, but Terri Ashmore, managing director for the Catholic church, said removing capacity farther south will be a challenge for people getting to the basilica.

Travel on the roadway is already difficult for basilica visitors and the plan may not address congestion issues, Ashmore said.

“It does take away lanes from cars; I just think it’s going to get worse not better,” she said.

Proponents of the plan claim that reducing lanes will actually improve conditions in the corridor.

Ole Mersinger, project engineer, said that fewer lanes will have no significant impact on vehicle users of the corridor. Instead, it will provide for better channelizing and better flow of vehicles, he said.

The changes would have little impact on travel time for motorists, according to the traffic analysis by Kimley-Horn and Associates. The impact on traffic headed north is less than 30 seconds during peak periods, according to the analysis. With a southbound Lyndale/Hennepin lane removed, the impact to peak travel time is less than 15 seconds.

Reducing the number of lanes will also reduce the amount of weaving by vehicles — a major factor in the high number of side-swipe crashes in the area, Mersinger said. Other improvements like dedicated left turn lanes and electronic signage will help people move through the corridor more efficiently.

The basilica’s opposition puts it at odds with a large coalition of groups that support the changes. Craig Wilson, of the Lowry Hill Neighborhood Association, said the project had been “extensively vetted” over several months by area stakeholders. Wilson is a co-lead on a task force looking at the corridor.

At first, Wilson said groups were defensive about the project, but that engagement throughout the process as led to a better outcome overall.

He said no one party is getting everything it wanted from the process, but that the new layout will benefit all users of the corridor — vehicles, transit, bikes and pedestrians.

Council member Lisa Goodman, who came to the committee to share her opinion on the issue, said the changes give bicyclists and pedestrians greater priority while not compromising traffic flow.

“There is no way the situation over here could get worse,” said Goodman, who represents the project area in Ward 7.

Goodman said there were grander ideas for the troublesome area, but that the current project is a “first step in a long-term solution.”

Echoing Goodman’s comments, council member Lisa Bender said some of the more “transformative” ideas weren’t feasible at this time, but the small tweaks included in the plan will make a difference.

“They will be huge improvements in the daily experience of this roadway,” Bender said.

Bender and council member Cam Gordon also indicated at the committee meeting that they are supportive of reducing freeway capacity citywide.

The plan is set to go before the full City Council later this month, but Mersinger said the project team will continue discussing ideas with stakeholders for “behind-the-curb” improvements like landscaping and other elements.

Pending approval, the project would be out for bid in spring 2015.

Article source: http://finance-commerce.com/2014/09/panel-oks-lyndalehennepin-rehab-plans/

Wayzata lakefront starts to transform six months after plan approved



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    Boaters, bikers and beer drinkers will start to see some new attractions in Wayzata aimed at drawing more visitors to the Lake Minnetonka town.

    In the six months since the city approved highlighted at the community’s 40th annual James J. Hill Days festival this past weekend.

    Since the “Lake Effect” project was approved in March, the city has applied for more temporary docks to give boaters more spots to stop next spring. The city is working on plans to add more bike trails and convert a beach house into a food vendor similar to Minneapolis’ Sea Salt restaurant in Minnehaha Park. A new brewery is in the works. And this summer, volunteers planted 1,000 native plants, flowers and grasses next to an old railroad building that the city hopes to eventually restore.

    “There’s a lot of activity starting to unfold along the lakefront,” Mayor Ken Willcox said. “In general, people are enthusiastic and it’s moving forward at a steady pace.”

    Talk of revamping the city’s lakefront began back in 2011, when the city started a task force to come up with ways it could boost revenue and tourism from being on the Twin Cities’ busiest lake. Starting in 2012, community input sessions brought in more than 600 ideas that eventually led to a 10-year “vision” for how Wayzata could improve.

    By June, work was already beginning. Thanks to funding from the state Department of Natural Resources, St. Paul-based Great River Greening and community volunteers planted 1,000 native plants, flowers and grasses next to the historic railroad building, the Section Foreman’s House, for aesthetics and to help a neighboring stormwater pond.

    The city has also applied for temporary docks to put near the Boatworks building on the west side of its downtown and more docks near Broadway Avenue — where the city could someday add a pier. The new docks, which could be added next spring, still need approval from the Lake Minnetonka Conservation District.

    The city is also working with Hennepin County as the county starts work this month on a $41 million project to widen Bushaway Road, part of County Road 101, adding a bike trail and doing other improvements. For drivers entering east Wayzata from Bushaway, city leaders want to create more of a “gateway” by adding signs about the city and its history, improve landscaping and aesthetics as well as add trails to connect to the new Bushaway trail.

    In fact, the city is also looking to add bike lanes and expand the bike trail system throughout the town.

    “We need safer routes for bikers,” City Planner Bryan Gadow said.

    He’s also working with McCormick’s Pub on plans to renovate the city’s beach house to sell food out of it next year. And by November, the City Council is expected to get recommendations for next steps in the Lake Effect project from a consultant the city hired.

    New brewery on tap

    Another attraction residents said they wanted: a brewery.

    Now it’s nearing reality. After a state law change, many west metro cities have approved microbreweries and taprooms, including Excelsior, Minnetonka, Hopkins and St. Louis Park. Last week, Wayzata became the next to do so, with the City Council approving a revision to its city code to allow for microproduction facilities like microbreweries, also approving the city’s first one — Wayzata Brew Works.

    The brewery is slated to open in the Boatworks building — a historic former wooden boat manufacturing plant that’s one of the only commercial buildings in Wayzata directly on Lake Minnetonka. A new restaurant, spree of new restaurants.

    Now the new brewery is slated to open by October or November. It will replace office space and will include a 2,500-square-foot taproom and an outdoor patio.

    “It’s really a jewel on the lake — there are no other breweries that we’re aware of that are lakeside and with that kind of view,” said Bill Cavanagh, one of the owners.

    Cavanagh said the brewery will also include distilling on site to manufacture — not serve — vodka, gin, rum and whiskey to sell to stores.

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    Poe Mill residents to make community more welcoming

    A new park, landscaping and re-investment in the community are all part of a grand vision to revitalize Greenville’s historic Poe Mill neighborhood.

    But blocking the view to that vision for many is the corner of Shaw Street and Buncombe Road, the front door into the former mill village just outside the Greenville city limits.

    Community residents said in a report the “uninviting aesthetic appeal and concentration of criminal activity” at that corner “creates an impediment for attracting new investments, families searching for affordable housing and future visitors.”

    Months ago, they began developing a plan to make the area more appealing. On Saturday, they’ll begin putting that plan — The Poe Mill Gateway: Mural Project — into action.

    From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, residents will gather at the convenience store at 1410 Buncombe Road, where they’ll hold a kick-off party and begin painting a mural on the wall of the store.

    The image they’ll paint will symbolize the community, said Kwadjo Campbell, president of the New Poe Mill Neighborhood Association. The hope is that it will instill community pride.

    “We looked at studies that have been done in other areas,” Campbell said. “When you change the aesthetic appeal of an area, that makes people want to taker greater, grander ownership.”

    “If you can get people to feel good about their community and about what’s happening in their community, they’ll take care of their community,” he said.

    The project is part of a larger strategy to improve the intersection of Buncombe Road and Shaw Street, a major gateway into Poe Mill and its proposed park.

    The park is proposed on the 11-acre site of the former Poe Mill, which was destroyed by fire in 2003.

    In 2013, the Greenville County Redevelopment Authority received $800,000 in federal brownfield grants from the Environmental Protection Agency to clean up the old mill site.

    Half of the brownfield money will be spent removing hazardous substances from the 117-year-old mill, officials have said.

    The other half will be used to clear the site of remnants of the old mill so it can be transferred to the recreation district to begin park planning and development, said Martin Livingston, GCRA’s executive director.

    The mural project is owned entirely by the community, Livingston said.

    The redevelopment authority provided $2,000 in Community Development Block Grant monies. Another $500 came from the Grant Assistant Partnership, an effort of the city of Greenville and United Way of Greenville County, through the Greenville Dreams network, Livingston said.

    “Poe Mill is sort of on the rebound,” Bradley Robinson, United Way’s community engagement manager, said. “They’ve had some troubling times and now they’re on the rise, so this mural project is one, we felt, would keep them on that trajectory.”

    The neighborhood association planned the mural project through a number of community meetings last fall and this past summer. The F.W. Poe Textile Heritage Society also provided mural concepts and ideas.

    Local artist Adam Schrimmer was hired to install the mural, with help from volunteers he will train and oversee. The mural is scheduled to be completed this fall.

    The mural, Livingston said, will help a corner of the neighborhood become more visible and open.

    “I think that’s primarily why the neighborhood wanted to do it, but also the color, the aspects of the mural, will create an inviting corner of the neighborhood,” he said.

    Ross McClain, an associate professor of art and chair of the art department at Furman University, said he’s found that when Furman has done murals in other Greenville County communities, it’s had a huge impact. He said although he doesn’t have evidence, he believes murals help deter crime.

    “We believe it works tremendously, especially when you get the community to be a part of it — creating and actually implementing it. There’s this pride element and sense of ownership,” he said. “We’ve seen it have a remarkable impact.”

    Home Depot is providing in-kind support with project materials for the Poe Mill mural, and this past Saturday store volunteers helped residents prime and prep the wall.

    Campbell said the community’s plan for revitalization also includes landscaping, a traffic circle at Shaw Street and Buncombe Road, and “we’re trying to recruit more nonprofits to come in” to build new houses.

    He said Greenville Tech’s Quick Jobs program is helping to train some residents to become certified so they can apply for environmental jobs that will come with the mill site work.

    “It’s not guaranteed that they’ll get those jobs,” he said, “but at least they’re prepared to access the opportunity.”

    Everything that’s happening in Poe Mill now is working in synergy, Campbell said.

    “The community is going to turn,” said Campbell, a teacher at Legacy Charter School and an owner of J.C. Associates consulting firm.

    “I moved here about eight years or nine years ago from the D.C. area and … outside of the downtown, prices are blowing up,” he said. “We’re three or four minutes from downtown and we can already see people, professionals like myself, buying up homes.”

    In communities like this one, gentrification is going to happen, Campbell said, and “it’s already happening in parts of the downtown area.” The way to stop gentrification and maintain traditional residents is through education that will lead to better job opportunities, he said.

    “That’s what we’re doing. We want the people who have always lived here, the low-income community to come up with everyone,” Campbell said. “That’s why it’s just as important to provide this pretty aesthetic look as well as some tangible job training.

    “It’s all in concert to make this community experience the renaissance it’s due.”

    Article source: http://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/news/local/2014/09/09/poe-mill-residents-make-community-welcoming/15361835/

    ‘Creative Corridor’ reaches halfway point

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) – Part of Main Street is shutting down for three weeks, starting September 10th. It’s all a part of the city’s effort to revitalize the downtown area.

    “We’re halfway through with the project,” said John Honeywell, Director of Little Rock Public Works. We’ve completed the 100 block “The 200 block is nearing its completion and we started on the 300 block.”

    The old Main Street has quickly been transforming into the new ‘Creative Corridor,’ and it’s been several years in the making. But continued construction means the street has to shut down between Third and Fourth.

    “I’m going to have to change my route a little bit to get there,” said Caitlin Savage, who works nearby.

    She believes shutting down the 300 block will likely back up traffic.

    “I hope everyone leaves a little bit early when that’s closed,” Savage said.

    Vince Bruno, owner of Bruno’s Little Italy Restaurant, said he’s not worried about business slowing down.

    “We have a parking lot that we can use after 5 p.m.,” Bruno said. “So as long as we have signage to point people in that direction, because we’re open 5 to 10 at night, I don’t think it will affect us.”

    Although construction might be inconvenient for morning commuters, Honeywell feels it’s a positive in the long run.

    “On the 300 block, we’re working on doing rain gardens, doing bigger landscaping areas, he said. “We’re also doing a plaza type structure at the intersection of Fourth and Main.”

    Sidewalks will soon absorb rain water, allowing it to be put back into the water system. The idea is for the area to be a gateway to the new revitalized downtown.

    “We’re excited to be about halfway done and we’re really excited to see it completed and see what the transformation is going to be and then how it matures from this point in the future,” Honeywell said.

    “They’re going to have it fixed up so nice that everyone is going to come down here,” Bruno said.

    The road closure starts at 7 a.m. on September 10. This phase of the project will be done by October. Honeywell expects the entire creative corridor be completed by the end of the year.

    STORY: Main Street to close between Third and Fourth streets

    Article source: http://www.thv11.com/story/news/local/little-rock/2014/09/09/creative-corridor-reaches-halfway-point/15359209/

    Theodore Payne New Classes and Fall Plant Sale

    Article source: http://ktla.com/2014/09/09/theodore-payne-new-classes-and-fall-plant-sale/

    Edible landscapes talk, ‘Neighborhood SELLabration,’ fall herb festival and … – The Times-Picayune

    Upcoming events:

    Edible landscapes: Parkway Partners Second SaturdaySaturday, Sept. 13, Parkway Partners, 1137 Baronne St. — Demetria Christo will lead presentation on edible landscaping. Also available at the  greenhouse will be herb and cole vegetable starts.

    Neighborhood SELLabration — Saturday, Sept. 13, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., PRC, 923 Tchoupitoulas St. — The Preservation Resource Center’s annual homebuyer fair provides information on buying and renovating older homes in historic New Orleans neighborhoods.

    ‘Plants of Power, Magic and Medicine’ –Saturday, Sept. 13, 10 a.m., Pavilion of Two Sisters, New Orleans Botanical Garden, City Park — Mark Plotkin, an ethnobotanist and author of “Tales of a Shaman’s Apprentice,” will lecture on healing plants from the Amazon rainforest and shaman traditions. Plotkin, a New Orleans native, is president of the Amazon Conservation Team, a nonprofit dedicated to protecting biological and cultural diversity of the tropical rainforest. He previously worked at the Botanical Museum of Harvard University, the World Wildlife Fund and for Conservation International. A booksigning will be held with the event. Cost: $25. 504.483.9473.

    Madisonville Art MarketSaturday, Sept. 13, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Water Street, Madisonville  — The market features painting, mixed media, photography, jewelry, wood carving, sculpture, stained glass and more by local artists. madisonvilleartmarket.com, 985.643.5340.

    Piety Street Market — Saturday, Sept. 13, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 612 Piety St. — More than 30 vendors offer handmade art, crafts and jewelry, vintage clothes, used books and flea market finds. 504.269.3982

    Orchid society meetingTuesday, Sept. 16, 7 p.m., Garden Study Center, New Orleans Botanical Gardens. (enter through the rear gate.) — Glen Ladnier will give a presentation on “terrestrial orchids.” The Orchid Basics program begins at 7 p.m. with the meeting at 7:30. Visitors welcome. Free. neworleansorchidsociety.org.

    Iris transplantingTuesday, Sept. 16, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, City Park — The Master Gardeners of Greater New Orleans and the Greater New Orleans Iris Society will dig up Louisiana irises, placing confinement rings and replanting named cultivars. Other irises will be transported to the Zydeco Louisiana Iris Garden in City Park. The public is invited to participate.

    Fall Garden SeminarSept. 19, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Journey Fellowship Church auditorium, 30042 N. Dixie Ranch Road, Lacombe — The seminar, hosted by the St. Tammany Master Gardener Association, will cover fall-blooming coastal wildflowers, fall vegetables and advice for the fall and winter gardener. Clinics on composting and the Louisiana Super Plant program will be featured. Registration deadline: Sept. 12. To register: 985.875.2635.

    Looking ahead
    Lakeview Civic Improvement Association MeetingSept. 20, 9 a.m., St. Dominic School gym, 6326 Memphis St.— Open to Lakeview residents. Refreshments will be provided.

    First-Time Renovator TrainingSept. 23, 6-8:30 p.m., and Sept. 30, 6-8:30 p.m., 923 Tchoupitoulas St. — The course, hosted by the Preservation Resource Center, is designed for those on a limited budget purchasing a home for the first time and anyone thinking of renovating. Topics covered include: the pros and cons of renovating, how to select a project that is right for your budget and financing options. $40 ($35 for PRC members). Pre-registration required: 504.636.3399 or sblaum@prcno.org.

    Renovators’ Happy HourSept. 25, 5:30-7 p.m., 872 Taft Place — Take a tour of a circa 1941 California bungalow whose owners have faced extensive renovation challenges. Light refreshments provided. Wine and beer available for a suggested donation. 504.636.3399 or sblaum@prcno.org.

    Daylily Society meetingSept. 27, 9:30-noon, Eastbank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave. Metairie — Sarah Bertrand, Jefferson Parish LSU AgCenter assistant horticulture agent, will describe the new daylily species collection at the LSU AgCenter Hammond Research Station. Free.   

    Fall Herb FestivalSept. 30, 3-6 p.m., Slidell Library Herb Garden, 555 Robert Blvd. — The festival features talks and demonstrations on growing organic greens, beekeeping and “Cool clean green drinks,” an herb tasting, children’s activities and guided tours of the Slidell Library herb garden.
    *****
    Have an item? To have your home or garden event listed, send a fact sheet at least two weeks before the event to insideout@nola.com.

    Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2014/09/edible_landscapes_talk_neighbo.html

    Bridgeland farmers market offers last of summer produce; gardening tips

    The next farmers market at master-planned community Bridgeland in Cypress will offer the last of the summer produce, as well as a crash course on fall gardening.

    The market will be 12:30-3:30 p.m. Sept. 14 in the parking lot adjacent to the activity center, 16902 Bridgeland Landing.

    Several new vendors will be making an appearance at the event, including Gulf Coast Urban Farms, bringing salad greens and dressings, and Lil Emma’s Seafood, offering fresh Gulf Coast shrimp.

    Popcart Ice Pops will make a market debut, serving handmade fruit or dairy-based frozen treats, as well as YLive Juice and Smoothie Bar, offering fruit and veggie juices.

    The market has several vendors offering fresh produce from local farmers, including Atkinson Farms, Fallow Creek Farms, Georgia’s Farm to Market and Peas Farm.

    Prepared foods are provided by Nisha’s Quick and Ezee Indian Food and Diamond B Farms, which offers tamales, salsas and homemade pickles.

    Other items on sale will be honey by Pure Texas Honey and Bees Cotti; live flowers from Orchid Obsession; olive oils, soaps and lotions from Olivero Farms; handmade jams and jellies from Vela Farms ;and snacks for pets by Four Feet Treats.

    Specialty meats will be on sale at the Marchese Italian Sausage, Shiner Pork and the Texas T Kobe Beef booths.

    New Leaf Nursery and Ready to Grow Gardens will offer plants and advice needed to start a garden.

    There will also be goat cheese available from Hammond Farm, handmade soaps and lotions from M.B. Vintage Essentials, fresh dips at Salinas Salsa Works, allergen-free, sweet treats from Esti’s Best, authentic European-style breads from Slow Dough and all things lavender from Lavande lavender.

    Carey Kindly will offer natural cleaning products, Della Casa Pasta will sell fresh pasta, Paleo Cottage serves up natural, un-roasted nut butters and Hog Creek Farm will offer pork, eggs and goat’s milk soap.

    Shoppers can snack on cashews, pecans, almonds roasted with cinnamon and sugar from CL Nut Company, stop by the Big Poppa Kettle Corn booth or get some barbecue from King of the Pit.

    Custom Confections is the place to go for made-from-scratch treats, which pair well with Café ZunZun coffee roasted fresh in Cypress or specialty brews by Righteous Bros. Coffee.

    Stephanie Baker, owner of Ready to Grow Gardens, will lead a class starting 1 p.m. Her class will cover how to prepare a raised vegetable bed, the best planting schedules and tips on caring for and fertilizing fall crops.

    “The class will be about all the basics, from site selection to picking the right soil to choosing the right plants all the way to growing and harvesting,” Baker said. “People are excited about vegetable gardening, but they often don’t know the right steps to take.”

    She also enjoys shopping at the market.

    “It’s just a friendly atmosphere,” she said. “And there’s a wide selection of produce and other items for sale. It’s a great variety.”

    Birgit Eisenkoelbl is one of the organizers and volunteers of the market.

    “The market was started by a community group,” she said. “They wanted to setup a local farmers and local vendors together.”

    The first market was held on May 2012.

    “It was very successful,” Eisenkoelbl said. “They decided to make it a regular event.”

    Organizers then launched the market in August 2012.

    “We had 13 local vendors, and now we’ve grown to more than 30,” Eisenkoelbl said.

    “We’re constantly adding more.”

    She said vendors regularly teach classes at the market as well.

    “We try to engage our vendors to talk about what they grow or do cooking demonstrations,” she said. “We have different classes every month.”

    Eisenkoelbl said volunteers visit the farmers and producers featured at the market.

    “We do quality checks,” she said. “For us, it’s important to have the product home-grown in a natural way or homemade with natural products.”

    Held on the second Sunday of each month, the Farmers Market at Bridgeland is becoming a neighborhood favorite.

    Article source: http://www.chron.com/neighborhood/cyfair/news/article/Bridgeland-farmers-market-offers-last-of-summer-5744262.php

    Expert offers tips on growing fruit trees in the home garden

    Do you have a “green thumb” for gardening, but feel daunted by planting and caring for fruit trees? Experts say it’s really not that difficult to learn the basics, and the results can be bountiful and even artistic. Given the right conditions, you could be harvesting a crop before you know it, and creating a lasting impression in your yard’s landscape along the way.

    The Windsor Garden Club began a new program year at the L.P. Wilson Community Center on Sept. 8 with a presentation titled, “Small Fruits and Fruit Trees for the Home Garden.” The speaker, Mary Concklin, a fruit specialist at the University of Connecticut with more than 40 years of experience as a grower and consultant, offered advice on how to get started.

    Many common fruit plants can easily be integrated into your landscape. “Blueberries are an edible landscape that look good and make great ground cover. Blueberry plants offer lots of landscape value, and the fall foliage is red,” said Concklin. Blueberries should be planted in the springtime and watered throughout the summer months. Concklin suggested planting them 4 to 6 feet apart and pruning every year.

    One method of pruning and rejuvenation, called “shocking,” involves cutting most everything back, removing old canes and dead wood. “One third of the oldest canes should be removed in the first year,” said Concklin. Then be sure to repeat this process over the next couple of years.

    Concklin also talked about fall fruiting brambles, which are easily maintained. You can create a nice border in your landscape with these, or plant them in a container, she said. Strawberries, as well, are easy to grow and look lovely peeking out of gutters, piping, or hanging baskets. Just prune them in July, add soil at the root crown, and make sure to cover them in the frost.

    If you’re into wine-making, all you need is a few grape plants to get started. You can make use of grow tubes for these, and prune 70 to 90 percent in the dormant season. “Arbors and pergolas are great for growing grapes, and they smell wonderful,” said Concklin.

    And, if you thought your yard was too small for an apple tree, think again. Concklin suggests dwarf trees for such spaces. These need to be pruned once growth has started, and you can create designs in doing so, by bending the branches.

    Concklin also said that only 3 percent of insects are, in fact, pests. “All fruit trees can tolerate some insects and disease,” she said. She also said that netting is important to protect from the 40 different kinds of birds who like to swoop in and take part of the pickings.

    “Aim for that balance in nature,” she said. “Fruits are easy and fun to grow. Mix them in with ornamentals and use your imagination.”

    Article source: http://www.courant.com/reminder-news/windsor-edition/rnw-wn-p5-windsor-garden-club-0918-20140909,0,7416356.story

    Community garden tour, fall bulbs, DIY wedding floral workshop



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    A Bachman’s class on DIY bridal flowers will cover centerpiece design as well as touching on bridal bouquets.

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    Tour 30 gardens

    Community gardeners in Minneapolis and St. Paul will celebrate Community Garden Day on Saturday with a free “parade” of more than 30 gardens. Visitors are invited to take a self-guided tour of one or more participating gardens to see what’s growing and meet the people who do the tending. There will be special events at some gardens, such as a bike tour linking community gardens in north Minneapolis, a beehive demo in collaboration with Beez Kneez at Emerson Community Garden and a “picnic operetta” performance of “King Arthur” hosted by Mixed Precipitation theater company at Robbinsdale Community Garden. Other activities include art projects, local music, potlucks, workshops and more. For a complete listing of events, visit www.gardeningmatters.org/community-garden-day/event-directory.

    Plant now, enjoy later

    If you want to see blooming flowers in your yard next spring, now is the time to plant bulbs. Gertens is offering a free seminar covering everything you need to know: how to pick the right variety for your conditions, how to critter-proof your bulbs, how to apply fertilizer and how to “force” bulbs indoors. The seminar will be offered at 1 p.m. Saturday, and again at 1 p.m. on Sept. 20, 27 and Oct. 4. Registration is requested at www.gertens.com/events. Gertens is located at 5500 Blaine Av., Inver Grove Heights.

    DIY wedding florals

    Want to try your hand at creating your own bridal bouquet or centerpiece? Bachman’s is presenting its popular “DIY Wedding Floral Design Workshop” on Sept. 18, 6 to 8 p.m.

    The class is designed for the DIY bride or groom who wants to learn professional tips and tricks for creating their own floral arrangements. Floral designer Cathy Brunk will focus on centerpieces, while also touching on bridal bouquets.

    The cost of $50 covers all materials needed for your floral creations. Register at www.bachmans.com. The workshop will be held in the design room at Bachman’s on Lyndale.

    Also upcoming at Bachman’s is another design workshop, focused on “Fall Mini Gardens.” Kristen Peterson will lead participants through the process of creating a mini garden, including appropriate plant use, and how to care for and personalize your creation. The $50 cost includes all supplies, but participants are invited to bring items to further personalize their gardens. The workshop will be offered 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday at Bachman’s on Lyndale in the design room.

    Bachman’s is located at 6010 Lyndale Av. S., Minneapolis.

    KIM PALMER

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