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Archives for July 10, 2014

Gardening tips for sloping landscapes

Imaginative gardeners don’t see tough terrain quite the way other people do. Where others see a swamp, they see future fishponds, boardwalks and bog gardens, and where their chosen site is almost vertical, they visualize viewpoints, flower-filled alpine cliffs and excellent drainage.

To a husband-and-wife gardening team in Chilliwack, the raw subdivision moonscape around them was a source of rough soil they could use to terrace the steep dropoff behind their newly constructed home. Contractors who had been paying to truck soil miles away were glad to dump a few loads in a nearby lot.

Once the soil was waiting in the front yard, the gardeners rigged up a wooden chute, which stretched from the front yard down into the rear. She shovelled soil into the chute, where it slid downhill. Meanwhile, far below, he shovelled the soil from the chute into a wheelbarrow and distributed it around.

Today, the upper terrace is a green lawn bordered with compact shrubs where people can sit under a patio roof and view the distant mountains.

The lower terrace is a mini woodland, where a pea gravel floor meanders around raised rock-ringed beds. Water in the nearby fish pool has high levels of oxygen after its swift journey downhill via a little stream.

The bottom of a slope is a natural spot for fishponds, and the freshening of the water doesn’t have to be done by a simple stream. Where the slope is very steep and faces the house, a rock wall plus water can be quite spectacular.

This is what two Surrey gardeners did with their rugged, weedy front yard. Most of it is now a large fishpond backed by a rock wall where water seeps and trickles and is punctuated by two waterfalls.

These don’t have to be large. Most gardeners with streams running down to a pond manage to add a large rock or two or a couple of steps over which water cascades.

Rocky cliffsides have other uses too. A Kamloops gardener couldn’t plant the bare rock cliff, which stretched across the far end of his back garden. But he enjoyed the way it prolonged his garden season by storing the sun’s heat and then releasing it during cold nights.

Where slopes are formed by clay or sand, stability can be a huge issue. Steps can be one solution.

A North Vancouver gardener with a big, sloping yard built a long line of steps, which she broke into sections by adding landings at intervals. These were emphasized by pergolas supporting climbing vines.

In the early stages of planning their North Surrey garden, two gardeners plotted out routes for electrical lines along steps. This made it possible to install lights under the risers so that people could navigate the garden at night.

Deep-rooted trees can also add stability to slopes. But how deep the roots plunge depends on the soil. Even deep-rooted trees may have problems unless the soil is also deep.

Some of the most effective stabilizing trees are oaks, liriodendrons and walnuts, but these need care in placement because they ultimately grow so large they dominate and shade small gardens.

Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to her via amarrison@shaw.ca. It helps if you add the name of your city or region.

© Royal City Record

Article source: http://www.royalcityrecord.com/community/gardening/gardening-tips-for-sloping-landscapes-1.1200249

Gardening tips for sloping landscapes

Imaginative gardeners don’t see tough terrain quite the way other people do. Where others see a swamp, they see future fishponds, boardwalks and bog gardens, and where their chosen site is almost vertical, they visualize viewpoints, flower-filled alpine cliffs and excellent drainage.

To a husband-and-wife gardening team in Chilliwack, the raw subdivision moonscape around them was a source of rough soil they could use to terrace the steep dropoff behind their newly constructed home. Contractors who had been paying to truck soil miles away were glad to dump a few loads in a nearby lot.

Once the soil was waiting in the front yard, the gardeners rigged up a wooden chute, which stretched from the front yard down into the rear. She shovelled soil into the chute, where it slid downhill. Meanwhile, far below, he shovelled the soil from the chute into a wheelbarrow and distributed it around.

Today, the upper terrace is a green lawn bordered with compact shrubs where people can sit under a patio roof and view the distant mountains.

The lower terrace is a mini woodland, where a pea gravel floor meanders around raised rock-ringed beds. Water in the nearby fish pool has high levels of oxygen after its swift journey downhill via a little stream.

The bottom of a slope is a natural spot for fishponds, and the freshening of the water doesn’t have to be done by a simple stream. Where the slope is very steep and faces the house, a rock wall plus water can be quite spectacular.

This is what two Surrey gardeners did with their rugged, weedy front yard. Most of it is now a large fishpond backed by a rock wall where water seeps and trickles and is punctuated by two waterfalls.

These don’t have to be large. Most gardeners with streams running down to a pond manage to add a large rock or two or a couple of steps over which water cascades.

Rocky cliffsides have other uses too. A Kamloops gardener couldn’t plant the bare rock cliff, which stretched across the far end of his back garden. But he enjoyed the way it prolonged his garden season by storing the sun’s heat and then releasing it during cold nights.

Where slopes are formed by clay or sand, stability can be a huge issue. Steps can be one solution.

A North Vancouver gardener with a big, sloping yard built a long line of steps, which she broke into sections by adding landings at intervals. These were emphasized by pergolas supporting climbing vines.

In the early stages of planning their North Surrey garden, two gardeners plotted out routes for electrical lines along steps. This made it possible to install lights under the risers so that people could navigate the garden at night.

Deep-rooted trees can also add stability to slopes. But how deep the roots plunge depends on the soil. Even deep-rooted trees may have problems unless the soil is also deep.

Some of the most effective stabilizing trees are oaks, liriodendrons and walnuts, but these need care in placement because they ultimately grow so large they dominate and shade small gardens.

Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to her via amarrison@shaw.ca. It helps if you add the name of your city or region.

© Royal City Record

Article source: http://www.royalcityrecord.com/community/gardening/gardening-tips-for-sloping-landscapes-1.1200249

Gardening tips for sloping landscapes

Imaginative gardeners don’t see tough terrain quite the way other people do. Where others see a swamp, they see future fishponds, boardwalks and bog gardens, and where their chosen site is almost vertical, they visualize viewpoints, flower-filled alpine cliffs and excellent drainage.

To a husband-and-wife gardening team in Chilliwack, the raw subdivision moonscape around them was a source of rough soil they could use to terrace the steep dropoff behind their newly constructed home. Contractors who had been paying to truck soil miles away were glad to dump a few loads in a nearby lot.

Once the soil was waiting in the front yard, the gardeners rigged up a wooden chute, which stretched from the front yard down into the rear. She shovelled soil into the chute, where it slid downhill. Meanwhile, far below, he shovelled the soil from the chute into a wheelbarrow and distributed it around.

Today, the upper terrace is a green lawn bordered with compact shrubs where people can sit under a patio roof and view the distant mountains.

The lower terrace is a mini woodland, where a pea gravel floor meanders around raised rock-ringed beds. Water in the nearby fish pool has high levels of oxygen after its swift journey downhill via a little stream.

The bottom of a slope is a natural spot for fishponds, and the freshening of the water doesn’t have to be done by a simple stream. Where the slope is very steep and faces the house, a rock wall plus water can be quite spectacular.

This is what two Surrey gardeners did with their rugged, weedy front yard. Most of it is now a large fishpond backed by a rock wall where water seeps and trickles and is punctuated by two waterfalls.

These don’t have to be large. Most gardeners with streams running down to a pond manage to add a large rock or two or a couple of steps over which water cascades.

Rocky cliffsides have other uses too. A Kamloops gardener couldn’t plant the bare rock cliff, which stretched across the far end of his back garden. But he enjoyed the way it prolonged his garden season by storing the sun’s heat and then releasing it during cold nights.

Where slopes are formed by clay or sand, stability can be a huge issue. Steps can be one solution.

A North Vancouver gardener with a big, sloping yard built a long line of steps, which she broke into sections by adding landings at intervals. These were emphasized by pergolas supporting climbing vines.

In the early stages of planning their North Surrey garden, two gardeners plotted out routes for electrical lines along steps. This made it possible to install lights under the risers so that people could navigate the garden at night.

Deep-rooted trees can also add stability to slopes. But how deep the roots plunge depends on the soil. Even deep-rooted trees may have problems unless the soil is also deep.

Some of the most effective stabilizing trees are oaks, liriodendrons and walnuts, but these need care in placement because they ultimately grow so large they dominate and shade small gardens.

Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to her via amarrison@shaw.ca. It helps if you add the name of your city or region.

© Royal City Record

Article source: http://www.royalcityrecord.com/community/gardening/gardening-tips-for-sloping-landscapes-1.1200249

Gardening tips for sloping landscapes

Imaginative gardeners don’t see tough terrain quite the way other people do. Where others see a swamp, they see future fishponds, boardwalks and bog gardens, and where their chosen site is almost vertical, they visualize viewpoints, flower-filled alpine cliffs and excellent drainage.

To a husband-and-wife gardening team in Chilliwack, the raw subdivision moonscape around them was a source of rough soil they could use to terrace the steep dropoff behind their newly constructed home. Contractors who had been paying to truck soil miles away were glad to dump a few loads in a nearby lot.

Once the soil was waiting in the front yard, the gardeners rigged up a wooden chute, which stretched from the front yard down into the rear. She shovelled soil into the chute, where it slid downhill. Meanwhile, far below, he shovelled the soil from the chute into a wheelbarrow and distributed it around.

Today, the upper terrace is a green lawn bordered with compact shrubs where people can sit under a patio roof and view the distant mountains.

The lower terrace is a mini woodland, where a pea gravel floor meanders around raised rock-ringed beds. Water in the nearby fish pool has high levels of oxygen after its swift journey downhill via a little stream.

The bottom of a slope is a natural spot for fishponds, and the freshening of the water doesn’t have to be done by a simple stream. Where the slope is very steep and faces the house, a rock wall plus water can be quite spectacular.

This is what two Surrey gardeners did with their rugged, weedy front yard. Most of it is now a large fishpond backed by a rock wall where water seeps and trickles and is punctuated by two waterfalls.

These don’t have to be large. Most gardeners with streams running down to a pond manage to add a large rock or two or a couple of steps over which water cascades.

Rocky cliffsides have other uses too. A Kamloops gardener couldn’t plant the bare rock cliff, which stretched across the far end of his back garden. But he enjoyed the way it prolonged his garden season by storing the sun’s heat and then releasing it during cold nights.

Where slopes are formed by clay or sand, stability can be a huge issue. Steps can be one solution.

A North Vancouver gardener with a big, sloping yard built a long line of steps, which she broke into sections by adding landings at intervals. These were emphasized by pergolas supporting climbing vines.

In the early stages of planning their North Surrey garden, two gardeners plotted out routes for electrical lines along steps. This made it possible to install lights under the risers so that people could navigate the garden at night.

Deep-rooted trees can also add stability to slopes. But how deep the roots plunge depends on the soil. Even deep-rooted trees may have problems unless the soil is also deep.

Some of the most effective stabilizing trees are oaks, liriodendrons and walnuts, but these need care in placement because they ultimately grow so large they dominate and shade small gardens.

Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to her via amarrison@shaw.ca. It helps if you add the name of your city or region.

© Royal City Record

Article source: http://www.royalcityrecord.com/community/gardening/gardening-tips-for-sloping-landscapes-1.1200249

Gardening tips for sloping landscapes

Imaginative gardeners don’t see tough terrain quite the way other people do. Where others see a swamp, they see future fishponds, boardwalks and bog gardens, and where their chosen site is almost vertical, they visualize viewpoints, flower-filled alpine cliffs and excellent drainage.

To a husband-and-wife gardening team in Chilliwack, the raw subdivision moonscape around them was a source of rough soil they could use to terrace the steep dropoff behind their newly constructed home. Contractors who had been paying to truck soil miles away were glad to dump a few loads in a nearby lot.

Once the soil was waiting in the front yard, the gardeners rigged up a wooden chute, which stretched from the front yard down into the rear. She shovelled soil into the chute, where it slid downhill. Meanwhile, far below, he shovelled the soil from the chute into a wheelbarrow and distributed it around.

Today, the upper terrace is a green lawn bordered with compact shrubs where people can sit under a patio roof and view the distant mountains.

The lower terrace is a mini woodland, where a pea gravel floor meanders around raised rock-ringed beds. Water in the nearby fish pool has high levels of oxygen after its swift journey downhill via a little stream.

The bottom of a slope is a natural spot for fishponds, and the freshening of the water doesn’t have to be done by a simple stream. Where the slope is very steep and faces the house, a rock wall plus water can be quite spectacular.

This is what two Surrey gardeners did with their rugged, weedy front yard. Most of it is now a large fishpond backed by a rock wall where water seeps and trickles and is punctuated by two waterfalls.

These don’t have to be large. Most gardeners with streams running down to a pond manage to add a large rock or two or a couple of steps over which water cascades.

Rocky cliffsides have other uses too. A Kamloops gardener couldn’t plant the bare rock cliff, which stretched across the far end of his back garden. But he enjoyed the way it prolonged his garden season by storing the sun’s heat and then releasing it during cold nights.

Where slopes are formed by clay or sand, stability can be a huge issue. Steps can be one solution.

A North Vancouver gardener with a big, sloping yard built a long line of steps, which she broke into sections by adding landings at intervals. These were emphasized by pergolas supporting climbing vines.

In the early stages of planning their North Surrey garden, two gardeners plotted out routes for electrical lines along steps. This made it possible to install lights under the risers so that people could navigate the garden at night.

Deep-rooted trees can also add stability to slopes. But how deep the roots plunge depends on the soil. Even deep-rooted trees may have problems unless the soil is also deep.

Some of the most effective stabilizing trees are oaks, liriodendrons and walnuts, but these need care in placement because they ultimately grow so large they dominate and shade small gardens.

Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to her via amarrison@shaw.ca. It helps if you add the name of your city or region.

© Royal City Record

Article source: http://www.royalcityrecord.com/community/gardening/gardening-tips-for-sloping-landscapes-1.1200249

Chris and Tony scoop gold at garden show

A garden designer from the Lutterworth area scooped a gold award and the coveted Best in Show title at this year’s Gardeners’ World Live event.

Chris Cooper-Hayes, from Leire, near Lutterworth, along with fellow designer Tony Harding, from Elmesthorpe near Hinckley, received a Gold Medal and won Best in Show at the Royal Horticultural Society event at Birmingham’s NEC recently.

The pair’s winning border design entitled Poet’s Last Rest was inspired by the work of war poets.

The garden depicted the final journey of a soldier on his way to war where he finds a shady spot on the edge of a wood with a wildflower meadow before him.

Here he sits and writes one last poem before continuing on his march into battle.

Father-of three Chris, who runs Cooper-Hayes Garden Design and is also a graphic designer, said: “On this, the centenary year of the First World war, the brief for our garden was very emotive, and it is with some small satisfaction that it made some of the team in the RHS office cry.

“We knew our garden had a powerful story to tell, and so it was down to the integrity of the planting and the execution to bring the idea to life and capture this moment of calm where the soldier dreams of his garden back home and the sweetheart he’s left behind.

“The judges were really impressed with how we managed to fit so much narrative into such a small space and the public loved how tranquil the garden felt.”

Central to the duo’s design was a multi-stemmed silver birch, surrounded by geraniums, campanulas and ferns.

This lush scheme was underplanted with a range of other plants including the aptly-named Bugle.

The front of the garden was a meadow filled with poppies yet not a single flower bloomed until the morning of judging, when one tiny poppy emerged, representing the fallen soldier.

To add an element of theatre in the garden, Chris and Tony propped an army helmet against the stump, along with a soldier’s notebook and pencil, complete with journal entries and pencil drawings, and Chris even wrote some poetry to add to the realism.

Chris added: “The extra added touches helped to flesh out the idea and visitors and judges alike commented on how touching they found the scene.”

Chris and Tony both trained in horticulture and garden design at Brooksby Melton College in the county.

Article source: http://www.harboroughmail.co.uk/news/chris-and-tony-scoop-gold-at-garden-show-1-6168504

Chris and Tony scoop gold at garden show

A garden designer from the Lutterworth area scooped a gold award and the coveted Best in Show title at this year’s Gardeners’ World Live event.

Chris Cooper-Hayes, from Leire, near Lutterworth, along with fellow designer Tony Harding, from Elmesthorpe near Hinckley, received a Gold Medal and won Best in Show at the Royal Horticultural Society event at Birmingham’s NEC recently.

The pair’s winning border design entitled Poet’s Last Rest was inspired by the work of war poets.

The garden depicted the final journey of a soldier on his way to war where he finds a shady spot on the edge of a wood with a wildflower meadow before him.

Here he sits and writes one last poem before continuing on his march into battle.

Father-of three Chris, who runs Cooper-Hayes Garden Design and is also a graphic designer, said: “On this, the centenary year of the First World war, the brief for our garden was very emotive, and it is with some small satisfaction that it made some of the team in the RHS office cry.

“We knew our garden had a powerful story to tell, and so it was down to the integrity of the planting and the execution to bring the idea to life and capture this moment of calm where the soldier dreams of his garden back home and the sweetheart he’s left behind.

“The judges were really impressed with how we managed to fit so much narrative into such a small space and the public loved how tranquil the garden felt.”

Central to the duo’s design was a multi-stemmed silver birch, surrounded by geraniums, campanulas and ferns.

This lush scheme was underplanted with a range of other plants including the aptly-named Bugle.

The front of the garden was a meadow filled with poppies yet not a single flower bloomed until the morning of judging, when one tiny poppy emerged, representing the fallen soldier.

To add an element of theatre in the garden, Chris and Tony propped an army helmet against the stump, along with a soldier’s notebook and pencil, complete with journal entries and pencil drawings, and Chris even wrote some poetry to add to the realism.

Chris added: “The extra added touches helped to flesh out the idea and visitors and judges alike commented on how touching they found the scene.”

Chris and Tony both trained in horticulture and garden design at Brooksby Melton College in the county.

Article source: http://www.harboroughmail.co.uk/news/chris-and-tony-scoop-gold-at-garden-show-1-6168504

Chris and Tony scoop gold at garden show

A garden designer from the Lutterworth area scooped a gold award and the coveted Best in Show title at this year’s Gardeners’ World Live event.

Chris Cooper-Hayes, from Leire, near Lutterworth, along with fellow designer Tony Harding, from Elmesthorpe near Hinckley, received a Gold Medal and won Best in Show at the Royal Horticultural Society event at Birmingham’s NEC recently.

The pair’s winning border design entitled Poet’s Last Rest was inspired by the work of war poets.

The garden depicted the final journey of a soldier on his way to war where he finds a shady spot on the edge of a wood with a wildflower meadow before him.

Here he sits and writes one last poem before continuing on his march into battle.

Father-of three Chris, who runs Cooper-Hayes Garden Design and is also a graphic designer, said: “On this, the centenary year of the First World war, the brief for our garden was very emotive, and it is with some small satisfaction that it made some of the team in the RHS office cry.

“We knew our garden had a powerful story to tell, and so it was down to the integrity of the planting and the execution to bring the idea to life and capture this moment of calm where the soldier dreams of his garden back home and the sweetheart he’s left behind.

“The judges were really impressed with how we managed to fit so much narrative into such a small space and the public loved how tranquil the garden felt.”

Central to the duo’s design was a multi-stemmed silver birch, surrounded by geraniums, campanulas and ferns.

This lush scheme was underplanted with a range of other plants including the aptly-named Bugle.

The front of the garden was a meadow filled with poppies yet not a single flower bloomed until the morning of judging, when one tiny poppy emerged, representing the fallen soldier.

To add an element of theatre in the garden, Chris and Tony propped an army helmet against the stump, along with a soldier’s notebook and pencil, complete with journal entries and pencil drawings, and Chris even wrote some poetry to add to the realism.

Chris added: “The extra added touches helped to flesh out the idea and visitors and judges alike commented on how touching they found the scene.”

Chris and Tony both trained in horticulture and garden design at Brooksby Melton College in the county.

Article source: http://www.harboroughmail.co.uk/news/chris-and-tony-scoop-gold-at-garden-show-1-6168504

Chris and Tony scoop gold at garden show

A garden designer from the Lutterworth area scooped a gold award and the coveted Best in Show title at this year’s Gardeners’ World Live event.

Chris Cooper-Hayes, from Leire, near Lutterworth, along with fellow designer Tony Harding, from Elmesthorpe near Hinckley, received a Gold Medal and won Best in Show at the Royal Horticultural Society event at Birmingham’s NEC recently.

The pair’s winning border design entitled Poet’s Last Rest was inspired by the work of war poets.

The garden depicted the final journey of a soldier on his way to war where he finds a shady spot on the edge of a wood with a wildflower meadow before him.

Here he sits and writes one last poem before continuing on his march into battle.

Father-of three Chris, who runs Cooper-Hayes Garden Design and is also a graphic designer, said: “On this, the centenary year of the First World war, the brief for our garden was very emotive, and it is with some small satisfaction that it made some of the team in the RHS office cry.

“We knew our garden had a powerful story to tell, and so it was down to the integrity of the planting and the execution to bring the idea to life and capture this moment of calm where the soldier dreams of his garden back home and the sweetheart he’s left behind.

“The judges were really impressed with how we managed to fit so much narrative into such a small space and the public loved how tranquil the garden felt.”

Central to the duo’s design was a multi-stemmed silver birch, surrounded by geraniums, campanulas and ferns.

This lush scheme was underplanted with a range of other plants including the aptly-named Bugle.

The front of the garden was a meadow filled with poppies yet not a single flower bloomed until the morning of judging, when one tiny poppy emerged, representing the fallen soldier.

To add an element of theatre in the garden, Chris and Tony propped an army helmet against the stump, along with a soldier’s notebook and pencil, complete with journal entries and pencil drawings, and Chris even wrote some poetry to add to the realism.

Chris added: “The extra added touches helped to flesh out the idea and visitors and judges alike commented on how touching they found the scene.”

Chris and Tony both trained in horticulture and garden design at Brooksby Melton College in the county.

Article source: http://www.harboroughmail.co.uk/news/chris-and-tony-scoop-gold-at-garden-show-1-6168504

Chris and Tony scoop gold at garden show

A garden designer from the Lutterworth area scooped a gold award and the coveted Best in Show title at this year’s Gardeners’ World Live event.

Chris Cooper-Hayes, from Leire, near Lutterworth, along with fellow designer Tony Harding, from Elmesthorpe near Hinckley, received a Gold Medal and won Best in Show at the Royal Horticultural Society event at Birmingham’s NEC recently.

The pair’s winning border design entitled Poet’s Last Rest was inspired by the work of war poets.

The garden depicted the final journey of a soldier on his way to war where he finds a shady spot on the edge of a wood with a wildflower meadow before him.

Here he sits and writes one last poem before continuing on his march into battle.

Father-of three Chris, who runs Cooper-Hayes Garden Design and is also a graphic designer, said: “On this, the centenary year of the First World war, the brief for our garden was very emotive, and it is with some small satisfaction that it made some of the team in the RHS office cry.

“We knew our garden had a powerful story to tell, and so it was down to the integrity of the planting and the execution to bring the idea to life and capture this moment of calm where the soldier dreams of his garden back home and the sweetheart he’s left behind.

“The judges were really impressed with how we managed to fit so much narrative into such a small space and the public loved how tranquil the garden felt.”

Central to the duo’s design was a multi-stemmed silver birch, surrounded by geraniums, campanulas and ferns.

This lush scheme was underplanted with a range of other plants including the aptly-named Bugle.

The front of the garden was a meadow filled with poppies yet not a single flower bloomed until the morning of judging, when one tiny poppy emerged, representing the fallen soldier.

To add an element of theatre in the garden, Chris and Tony propped an army helmet against the stump, along with a soldier’s notebook and pencil, complete with journal entries and pencil drawings, and Chris even wrote some poetry to add to the realism.

Chris added: “The extra added touches helped to flesh out the idea and visitors and judges alike commented on how touching they found the scene.”

Chris and Tony both trained in horticulture and garden design at Brooksby Melton College in the county.

Article source: http://www.harboroughmail.co.uk/news/chris-and-tony-scoop-gold-at-garden-show-1-6168504