Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Archives for June 21, 2014

Toronto opens new park in Regent Park community

TORONTO, June 21, 2014 /CNW/ – Councillor Pam McConnell (Ward 28 Toronto Centre-Rosedale), City of Toronto staff and community members joined event partners Toronto Community Housing and The Daniels Corporation today to celebrate the opening of the new Regent Park.

“This park and its amenities provide a much desired natural recreational space for the community of Regent Park, allowing all a greater opportunity to enjoy the outdoors,” said Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly. “The City continues to reaffirm its commitment to increasing natural amenities in Toronto’s urban landscape.”

“Today’s celebration was a delightful reflection of the way this space can be used to bring people together to enjoy art, music, food and recreation,” said Councillor McConnell. “With the opening of this park, we also honour the contribution that Regent Park residents have made to the design of their neighbourhood gathering place.”

Toronto Community Housing provided the land to the City’s Parks, Forestry and Recreation division to develop into park space. The six-acre park is a $6.2 million investment by the City and includes a playground, splash pad, multi-purpose green space, plaza for community events, dog off-leash area, community gardens, greenhouse, bake oven, walkways and lush landscaping.

“This new park is a key part of how revitalization is fostering a vibrant community in Regent Park,” said Greg Spearn, Toronto Community Housing’s Chief Development Officer and interim President and CEO. “It’s a place at the heart of Regent Park where residents, neighbours and people from across the city can come together to be part of a community that thrives.”

“Regent Park, with the bake oven, greenhouse and community gardens, will provide a community gathering place where people, ideas and food can be shared and celebrated,” said Louise Moody, Executive Director of the Christian Resource Centre, the Chair Organization of the Regent Park Food Partnership. “The Regent Park Food Partnership is delighted by the opportunities to engage local residents in animating the new park.”

The new park’s amenities and Regent Park Food Partnership, comprised of over 25 community groups and individuals, will create numerous opportunities for people to get involved in planting, growing, harvesting, cooking and sharing food, as well as enjoying farmers’ markets, musical and public gatherings, and more.

“Regent Park is quickly becoming one of Toronto’s best communities to live, work and play,” said Martin Blake, Vice President of The Daniels Corporation, which is Toronto Community Housing’s Development Partner in the Regent Park Revitalization. “The new park joins the incredible amenities that already exist in this community including Daniels Spectrum and the Regional Aquatic Centre along with the soon-to-open community centre and athletic grounds. All of these amenities nurture a true sense of community and we expect this fantastic outdoor space to be a favourite for all ages!”

The park opening event, called The Magic City, was sponsored by Toronto Community Housing and The Daniels Corporation and brought to life by choreographer Bill Coleman of Coleman Lemieux Compagnie, with musical direction by John Oswald featuring the Toronto Symphony Orchestra with Maestro Bramwell Tovey, the Regent Park School of Music and over 400 performers of all ages from the Regent Park community. Community performances were supported by Artscape and Daniels Spectrum.

Regent Park is the ground-breaking example of how Toronto Community Housing’s approach to city building can transform a community into a successful, mixed-income, mixed-use neighbourhood, with rental buildings, market condominium buildings, townhomes, commercial space, community facilities, active parks and open space.

The new park spans the block from Dundas Street to the south, Sumach Street to the west, Sackville Street to the east and Oak Street to the north.

Toronto is Canada’s largest city, the fourth largest in North America, and home to a diverse population of about 2.8 million people. It is a global centre for business, finance, arts and culture and is consistently ranked one of the world’s most livable cities. Toronto is proud to be the Host City for the 2015 Pan American and Parapan American Games. For information on non-emergency City services and programs, Toronto residents, businesses and visitors can visit http://www.toronto.ca, call 311, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, or follow us @TorontoComms.

SOURCE City of Toronto

For further information: Media contact: Parks, Forestry and Recreation media line, 416-560-8726, pfrmedialine@toronto.ca, http://www.city.toronto.on.ca

Article source: http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/1377293/toronto-opens-new-park-in-regent-park-community

DEAN’S LAWN & LANDSCAPING: NEW OUTDOOR SHOWROOM COMES …

New this season, Dean’s Landscaping now has an outdoor showroom where you can experience a designed space for living outside. Dean Savarino’s showcase takes the homeowner through a series of scenarios which include a stainless steel outdoor kitchen, a furnished area for entertaining and socializing; also fire pits, custom stonework including pathways and water features like ponds and waterfalls.

The outdoor showroom at Dean’s in Schererville explains the seamless flow of great indoor design extending into the yard, porch, patio and pool area, better than words. As Dean says, “For our clients, it’s doubling their living space, but it is also about quality of life. The client comes home from the office and into another world. He can sit outside, enjoy a glass of wine and forget about everything else.”

Creating the outdoor showroom was the best way for a homeowner to see what a waterfall within a hardscape might look like from the deck or patio. In many cases Dean is building out from an existing home that the owners love, but have thought about opening up for years. Dean and his team work to turn that vision into the reality of a beautiful and functional outdoor space. The result: The family spends more time together and does more entertaining at home than ever before.

Though Dean’s is well-known for 3D design capability so clients can see a detailed model of what the landscape will look like when the project is finished, his company can now show a complete range of products built for the outdoor life including masonry, stoves and ovens that burn wood or gas, appliances tailored to poolside, including fans, lighting, furniture and patio heaters.

The panoramic view encloses the southern exterior at Deans but also flows towards the surrounding greenhouses.

The growing demand, along with the high-level of knowledge among clients, has caused an increase in volume at the top level of the new products. You can see the efficiencies everywhere in the outdoor showroom including the perfect rows of wind chimes all made in America; the cedar chalet birdhouses and the handmade wooden “enviro” pitcher. You may not think of a birdbath as a bright, metallic sculpture but when you see it catch the light, it will give you different and inspiring ideas.

Every good designer understands that communicating through the development of your landscape comes from within and every person’s visual sense. In that way, your topography is more than just a visual element and how you find what works for you is a journey that may start at Dean’s Landscaping’s outdoor showroom.

Article source: http://www.nwitimes.com/niche/shore/home-and-garden/dean-s-lawn-landscaping-new-outdoor-showroom-comes-online-in/article_49e1b408-5a53-5cf7-a76f-cea11980467d.html

New digs for Mendota Heights landscape firm



Quantcast




‘);
}
document.write(‘

  • ‘);
    document.write(‘

  • ‘);
    jQuery(‘.navTab’ + ad_AdvertiserArray.data[adt].advertiserID).click(ad_AdvertiserArray.data[adt], function(eventObj){
    window.location.href = “http://” + hostEnv + “www.startribune.com/weekly-ads/?dppAID=” + eventObj.data.advertiserID;
    });
    jQuery(‘.navTabWa’ + ad_AdvertiserArray.data[adt].advertiserID).click(ad_AdvertiserArray.data[adt], function(eventObj){
    window.location.href = “http://” + hostEnv + “www.startribune.com/weekly-ads/?dppAID=” + eventObj.data.advertiserID;
    });
    }

    ‘);
    }
    dppNavTab.start();



    hide

    Southview Design’s new building will have 9,000 square feet of office space.

    Photo: Provided rendering,

    CameraStar Tribune photo galleries

    Cameraview larger

    ul > li > a > img {
    margin-left: 4px;
    }
    ]]>

    Work began recently on new facilities in Mendota Heights for Southview Design, a landscape firm that has outgrown its current building in Inver Grove Heights.

    The new building, at 2383 Pilot Knob Road, will sit on a 3-acre campus to accommodate Southview’s fleet of vehicles, trailers, trucks and other equipment.

    The building will have 9,000 square feet of office space, plus an 8,000-square-foot warehouse and greenhouse, and is expected to be completed in December. Most of the landscaping will be completed this year.

    The new facility also will have an eco-friendly solution for water management, including two large rain gardens to manage drainage and contain stormwater onsite.

    Founded in 1978, Southview has completed over 7,000 residential and commercial landscaping projects. It recently was named one of America’s fastest-growing landscape firms by Landscape Management magazine.

    Chamber head resigns

    The Lakeville Area Chamber of Commerce has begun the search for a new president to replace Todd Bornhauser, who resigned June 12.

    Bornhauser had been president since 2000. His last official day on the job will be July 31.

    In a statement, Bornhauser said had enjoyed his years at the chamber but thought it was time to have a new president with “new excitement, new ideas and new energy to take the organization to the next level.”

    During Bornhauser’s tenure, chamber membership has doubled to 400. The organization also started its Landscape Home Expo, Foundation Bowling Tournament, and Lakeville YEA! (Young Entrepreneurs Academy).

    Pain treatment clinic opens

    A unique wellness center focused on pain management and treatment for addiction recently opened in Burnsville.

    The Valley Pain Relief and Wellness Center is a joint practice of two doctors, Svetlana Zaydman and Ashwin George. The new clinic is at 2428 E. 117th St.

    The center offers treatment to help patients manage a variety of painful conditions, including arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, migraines, shingles and cancer-related pain. The facility also offers treatment for alcohol and drug addiction.

    Building permits lower than previous year

    Construction in Lakeville — commercial as well as residential — has eased off slightly from last year’s frenetic pace.

    The city has issued building permits valued at $52.2 million through the end of May. This compares with $55.9 million for the same period in 2013.

    • get related content delivered to your inbox

    ‘);
    }
    if(jQuery.inArray(‘2611’, userSubsArray ) == -1) {
    document.write(‘

  • ‘);
    }
    if(jQuery.inArray(‘2751’, userSubsArray ) == -1) {
    document.write(‘

  • ‘);
    }

  • manage my email subscriptions
  • ‘);
    }

    ul > li > a > img {
    margin-left: 4px;
    }
    ]]>


    ADVERTISEMENT

    • Most read
    • Most Emailed
    • Most Watched

    <![CDATA[

    ]]>

    Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

    ADVERTISEMENT

    ADVERTISEMENT

    ADVERTISEMENT

    ADVERTISEMENT

    ADVERTISEMENT



    inside the StarTribune


    lifestyle

    Taste 50: A celebration of farmers markets


    jobs

    2014 Minnesota Top Workplaces


    entertainment

    Download our summer e-book thriller, ‘Savage Minnesota’!


    entertainment

    Soundcheck: Minnesota musicians up close


    lifestyle

    Best of Minnesota 2014: Food, drink, getaways, design and more


    home

    Beer me, Minnesota: Find the brew that’s right for you


    • 425 Portland Av. S.

      Minneapolis, MN 55488

      (612) 673-4000

    StarTribune.com is powered by Limelight Networks





    Close


    Article source: http://www.startribune.com/local/south/264117541.html

    Landscaping seminar, pond tour and more



    Quantcast




    ‘);
    }
    document.write(‘

  • ‘);
    document.write(‘

  • ‘);
    jQuery(‘.navTab’ + ad_AdvertiserArray.data[adt].advertiserID).click(ad_AdvertiserArray.data[adt], function(eventObj){
    window.location.href = “http://” + hostEnv + “www.startribune.com/weekly-ads/?dppAID=” + eventObj.data.advertiserID;
    });
    jQuery(‘.navTabWa’ + ad_AdvertiserArray.data[adt].advertiserID).click(ad_AdvertiserArray.data[adt], function(eventObj){
    window.location.href = “http://” + hostEnv + “www.startribune.com/weekly-ads/?dppAID=” + eventObj.data.advertiserID;
    });
    }

    ‘);
    }
    dppNavTab.start();



    hide

    Bamboo is one of several eco-friendly flooring materials that will be discussed during a free class at Natural Built Home.

    Photo: Orange County Register,

    CameraStar Tribune photo galleries

    Cameraview larger

    ul > li > a > img {
    margin-left: 4px;
    }
    ]]>

    Eco-friendly floors

    What makes a flooring material eco-friendly? Natural Built Home experts will explain the characteristics of bamboo, cork, linoleum, tile, wood, rubber and carpet, as well as paints and stains, in a free class, “Eco-friendly Floor 101,” at 11 a.m. Sat., 4020 Minnehaha Av. S., Mpls. Find out about various flooring and installation types and what works well for particular applications. Bring your questions and project ideas. Registration required; send e-mail to classes@naturalbuilthome.com or call 612-605-7999.

    Landscaping TLC

    By now, you know what’s thriving and what needs help in your yard and gardens. A Bachman’s seminar, “How to Troubleshoot Summer Landscaping,” will give tips on improving your lawn, vegetables, herbs, flowers and trees, as well as seasonal information on fertilizers, weed control, watering, pruning and treatment for fungus and insects. The seminar is offered July 2 and 8, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., 6010 Lyndale Av. S, Mpls. Cost is $5 and includes Bachman’s Care Sheets and a question-and-answer session. Register at www.bachmans.com or call 612-861-7600.

    Child’s play

    Need some creative inspiration for a child’s room? Lauren Stringer, a local children’s book illustrator, will read from several of her books, including “Deer Dancer” and “The Princess and Her Panther,” and share tips on designing special spaces just for kids, from 10 a.m. to noon Sat., Room and Board, 7010 France Av. S., Edina. To RSVP, call 952-927-8835.

    LYNN UNDERWOOD

    Last call for pond tour

    If a pond, waterfall or other water feature is on your wish list, check out several examples at the Twin Cities Pond and Landscape Tour, showcasing the work of Certified Aquascape Contractors.

    Sites will be open for touring noon to 5 p.m. June 22.

    Admission is free. For details about tour sites, visit www.tcpondand landscapetour.com.

    KIM PALMER

    • get related content delivered to your inbox

    ‘);
    }
    if(jQuery.inArray(‘2751’, userSubsArray ) == -1) {
    document.write(‘

  • ‘);
    }
    if(jQuery.inArray(‘2701’, userSubsArray ) == -1) {
    document.write(‘

  • ‘);
    }

  • manage my email subscriptions
  • ‘);
    }

    ul > li > a > img {
    margin-left: 4px;
    }
    ]]>


    ADVERTISEMENT

    • Most read
    • Most Emailed
    • Most Watched

    <![CDATA[

    ]]>

    Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

    ADVERTISEMENT

    GetGoAppFPO

    ADVERTISEMENT

    ADVERTISEMENT

    ADVERTISEMENT

    ADVERTISEMENT

    ADVERTISEMENT



    inside the StarTribune


    lifestyle

    Taste 50: A celebration of farmers markets


    jobs

    2014 Minnesota Top Workplaces


    entertainment

    Download our summer e-book thriller, ‘Savage Minnesota’!


    entertainment

    Soundcheck: Minnesota musicians up close


    lifestyle

    Best of Minnesota 2014: Food, drink, getaways, design and more


    home

    Beer me, Minnesota: Find the brew that’s right for you


    • 425 Portland Av. S.

      Minneapolis, MN 55488

      (612) 673-4000

    StarTribune.com is powered by Limelight Networks





    Close


    Article source: http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/homegarden/264020131.html

    BIZ BUZZ: Hammock Gardens Nursery & Landscaping adds floral division


    Cut Up and Sew instructor Gloria Brathwaite opened her own shop in Trinidad at age 23 and later sewed for the New York Metropolitan Opera. (Courtesy photo.)


    Ellen Schleicher heads Hammock Gardens Nursery  Landscaping's new floral division. (Courtesy photo.)


    Clarissa Moholick has been named cancer registry manager for the five regional hospitals, including Florida Hospital Flagler. (Courtesy photo.)


    Bob Vamos, a real estate agent who specializes in new construction, has been hired by RE/MAX Oceanside. (Courtesy photo.)


    (Click “Like” to become a fan of the Palm Coast Observer.)

    Cut Up and Sew gains new class instructor

    Cut Up and Sew has hired a new sewing instructor who opened her own shop in Trinidad at age 23 and later sewed for the New York Metropolitan Opera.

    “I am very excited to be working at Cut Up and Sew and teaching a sewing class called Sewing with Gloria,” teacher Gloria Brathwaite said in a Cut Up and Sew press release. “Sewing is a skill that stays with you for life, and I want to help people sharpen their skills in any way I can.”

    Brathwaite owned her own dressmaking shop in Trinidad when she was just 23, then moved to New York City in 1969, where she designed and sewed for the New York Metropolitan Opera, according to the release.

    That gave her experience in designing and sewing formal wear.

    She moved to Palm Coast in 1995, branching out into home decoration by working with interior designer Beth MacKinnon while also doing alterations for Bealls, according to the press release.

    She taught at Flagler Adult Education for almost nine years and opened the “Sew Glo” sewing shop on Old Kings Road in 2000.

    Brathwaite’s class is held 5-9 p.m. Mondays and on Tuesday afternoons.

    Cut Up and Sew is located at 160 Cypress Point Parkway, Unit D116.

    For more information, call 447-1103 or visit cutupandsew.com or facebook.com/pages/Cut-Up-and-Sew.

    Hammock Gardens Nursery Landscaping adds floral division

    Hammock Gardens Nursery Landscaping has added a full-service floral division.

    “We have received so many inquiries for fresh bouquets over the years, we are happy to be providing our customers with this additional service,” co-owner Janine Regina-Fonseca said in a press release. “We are blessed to be able to invest resources to keep up with our customer’s growing needs,” she added.

    The floral division offers large arrangements for events like weddings and funerals and also smaller bouquets and single flowers.

    It is headed by florist Ellen Schleicher, who has more than 30 years of experience growing, harvesting and selling flowers, according to the release.

    Hammock Gardens Nursery Landscaping opened in 2006. Owners Regina-Fonseca and Mike Fonseca offer landscaping design and lawn maintenance, and classes and advice tailored for the local environment.

    The Hammock Gardens Nursery Landscaping garden center and gift shop is located at 5208 North Oceanshore Blvd.

    For more information, call 446-9154 or go to hammockgardens.com or facebook.com/HammockGardens.

    Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler names new cancer registry manager

    Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler has named Clarissa Moholick as cancer registry manager for the five regional hospitals, including Florida Hospital Flagler, according to a Florida Hospital press release. 

    Moholick, who most recently most recently served as the oncology accreditation and data services regional manager and associate director for oncology administrative services and Institutional Review Board for Adventist Midwest Health, is based at the Cancer Institute at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center.

    She is responsible for planning and organizing cancer committees, cancer conferences and cancer registry operations at all of the Florida Hospital facilities with Volusia and Flagler counties.

    Moholick, a Clermont resident, is a certified tumor registrar and a certified clinical research professional.

    RE/MAX Oceanside hires new agent

    RE/MAX Oceanside has hired Bob Vamos, a real estate agent who specializes in new construction and was CEO of “a major plastic supplier to the auto industry” before entering the real estate industry two years ago, according to a press release.

    “Bob’s business knowledge will well serve his real estate customers” RE/MAX Oceanside Owner/Broker Donna Tofal said in the release. “His construction experience will be a great benefit to his home buying customers.”

    Vamos will work from both the RE/MAX office on State Road 100 and the model in Toscana on Old Kings Road.

    For more information on RE/MAX Oceanside, or to list or purchase a new home, call 439-1620 or visit rmoceanside.com or facebook.com/remaxoceanside.

    Paychex sales team hits annual goal, sales manager celebrates 12 years

    The Jacksonville sales team of payroll and human resources company Paychex, Inc. — which serves the Palm Coast area — hit its revenue goals for this year, according to a press release.

    Its sales manager, Kristin Sero, is also celebrating twelve years with the company.

    “It’s our goal to help businesses streamline their payroll, HR, insurance and benefit needs, which leads to business growth,” Sero said in the release, “and I’ve been blessed with the opportunity to assist with these goals for the past twelve years.

    The sales team more than doubled over the past 12 years. It was six when
    Sero started in 2002 and is now 14, according to the release.

    The team had $1.9 million in sales this past year, a number 105% over its goal,
    according to the release.

    Paychex is headquartered in Rochester, New York and has 150 offices nationwide. The Jacksonville office serves St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra, and parts of Georgia, Tallahassee, and the Panhandle as well as Palm Coast.

    For more information, contact Sero at 904-228-8681, or ksero@paychex.com, or visit paychex.com.

     

    Article source: http://www.palmcoastobserver.com/news/palm-coast/News/061920149570/BIZ-BUZZ-Hammock-Gardens-Nursery-Landscaping-adds-

    Busch Gardens landscape experts create wildlife habitat for lucky homeowner

    Once again, Busch Gardens Williamsburg offered its award-winning landscape skills to a homeowner with a needy yard.

    This year’s winner of the landscape giveaway, Naomi Donohoe, 37, of Salisbury, Md., wanted a fuss-free front yard that is also a habitat garden for wildlife. She also received a Bad Boy Mower from the giveaway’s co-sponsor.

    A disabled veteran, Donohoe has limited mobility from service-related injuries, so the team incorporated low-maintenance landscaping elements in the design. Shrubs and perennials provide year-round color and interest, and attract wildlife like bees, birds and butterflies.

    Kim Martinez, regional education manager for the National Wildlife Federation (www.nwf.org) visited the finished landscape to recognize the yard as a Certified Habitat Garden.

    “A habitat garden can be built in many sizes and styles, so long as the basic elements are met,” said Erick Elliott, director of Busch Gardens Landscape Operations.

    For 24 consecutive years Busch Gardens Williamsburg has won the “Most Beautiful Park” award from the National Amusement Park Historical Association. Last year, Busch Gardens began offering a new landscape to the winner of its Landscaping Giveaway contest.

    “Here, the house is very linear, and lends itself to a formal garden style,” Elliott said of Donohoe’s home.

    “By incorporating a short boxwood hedge, the landscape team provided the linear continuity for the garden, with formal topiary pieces to provide balance on the ends of the house. A half circle across the front of the home is filled with 10 different perennials in shades of purple to pink, providing blooms from April to October and seeds into the winter months.

    The selection of plants also assisted the design.

    “By selecting taller plants that are sturdy and ‘good for cutting,’ color blocks can remain more linear and help maintain a more formal appearance over time,” he said.

    “In a nod to Naomi’s love of cooking, a beautiful water feature has been created in an old brass kettle. The water creates a soothing sound as it cascades down the sides, while also providing places for birds and butterflies to drink. A robin was drinking and bathing within two hours of the water feature’s completion.”

    Habitat happy plants

    The garden provides seeds, nectar, pollen and berries for pollinators and wildlife, and also incorporates some groundcovers and evergreens for year-round interest. Many of the plants are drought tolerant once established.

    Here are the plants used in the design and the interest and purpose each brings to the landscape:

    1 juniper topiary poodle and two juniper spirals – evergreen and formal, they provide visual weight and balance to the house, even when perennials are not in bloom.

    40 Green Velvet boxwoods – evergreen is low-growing with the top rounding slightly if left untrimmed.

    6 September Charm anemone – fall-blooming.

    30 Plum Pudding heuchera – burgundy-foliage groundcover for insects and birds, creates space between the formal circle and front of house.

    3 Summer Snowflake viburnums – deciduous, dense green form with white flowers held above; red berries provide winter interest and food for birds.

    5 Blue Fortune agastache – mid-height transition woody perennial with powder-blue flower spikes in front of viburnum.

    Article source: http://www.dailypress.com/features/family/home-garden/dp-fea-diggin-0622-20140621,0,1595737.story

    Eco-tips for gardening

    Parry Sound North Star

    Now that the sun is shining and the temperature has climbed, Mother Nature has made a miraculous one eighty and our environment has changed from cold and desolate to lush and green. It never ceases to amaze me how quickly the seasons can change and how fast our part of the world can transition from hibernation to growth. Everything wants to live.

    This is also the time when thoughts turn to gardening and perennials, annuals and vegetables find their place in our yards and create beauty for the soul and nourishment for our bodies. However, there are little things that you can do while planting this year’s garden that can make your yard part of important habitat for the natural and human world.

    This year, take some time when planning your garden to make some room for insect friendly plants. It has become evident that both our bee and monarch butterfly populations are in trouble and your planting choices could help these important and beautiful creatures.

    For bees, plant lots of flowers with bright blooms and try to have species that mature at different times of the year. The internet gives you a full list of bee friendly plants and the added bonus is that the rest of your garden will benefit from an increase in bee activity.

    Our monarch butterflies are facing a crisis and the population that undertakes the absolutely miraculous multigenerational migration from Canada to Mexico and back is under serious threat and possibly heading towards extinction. At one point, the blame was on the loss of habitat in their wintering grounds in Mexico, but new studies are showing that it appears to be the decrease in milkweed here in Canada that is spelling doom for the monarch. The caterpillars must have a healthy and plentiful supply of milkweed all through the summer if they hope to grow and reproduce.  If you have milkweed in your yard or along your driveway, please leave it alone and if you don’t, you can look for seeds to plant. If you can’t find any, consider collecting pods in the fall and then planting them the next year.

    As for the rest of your garden, seek out native plants that enhance and support our local ecosystem. Balance your garden with a variety of different species and go gentle when weeding or tending the earth. Encourage and support toads, salamanders and snakes that will inevitably appear in a healthy yard. A healthy garden is not sterile, it is full of life and that is what you should strive for.

    Consider leaving a part of your garden to grow wild. Seed mixes with native wildflower plants are readily available and great for enhancing the health of your yard.  A lifeless, neatly manicured lawn is certainly something that lots of people seem to value but it is not what is best for the environment.

    It also goes without saying that pesticides and herbicides should be applied sparingly, if at all. I still remember clearly as a child watching friends spray bug bombs over the yard to kills mosquitoes. The grass would be filled with twitching dragonflies, bees and butterflies but I am not sure if I ever saw a single horsefly, deerfly or mosquito.

    Although there will come a time when controlling certain types of bugs or diseases may be necessary, there is often a natural and less harmful way to get the results you are looking for. At very least, if you must use a chemical treatment, apply it locally at the source and only when it is dry outside with no chance of rain. This will at least help contain the contaminant to the area you are looking to treat and keep it from running into our water system.

    Finally, at the end of the day, whether it is one tomato plant or acres of tulips and hostas, make sure you get out there and plant something. Flowers (and flowering weeds for that matter) are beautiful and enhance our environment and there is nothing tastier than a tomato that you have grown yourself.

    Have a great summer.

    Gardening Tips: Intern shares thoughts of working with the Extension

    Matthew Stevens

    Matthew Stevens



    Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 12:39 pm

    Gardening Tips: Intern shares thoughts of working with the Extension

    By Matthew Stevens

    The Daily Herald, Roanoke Rapids, NC

    |
    0 comments

    For the last several weeks, I’ve been lucky to have an intern working in the office with me — Trequan McGee, a Halifax County resident who is a rising sophomore studying horticulture at N.C. AT State University. Trequan is interested in a career with Extension, so he has been learning about what an extension agent such as myself does on a day-to-day basis and he has taken an important role in several projects I’ve worked on in the past few weeks. Since I am away at a conference in Asheville and Trequan’s internship period has drawn to a close, I’ve asked him to write a bit about his experience for this article. Here are some of his thoughts:

    Subscription Required


    An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety.


    You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

    Have an online subscription?


    Login Now

    Need an online subscription?


    Subscribe

    Login

    Or, use your
    linked account:


    Login Now

    Need an online subscription?


    Subscribe

    Login

    Or, use your
    linked account:

    on

    Friday, June 20, 2014 12:39 pm.

    Article source: http://www.rrdailyherald.com/opinion/columns/gardening-tips-intern-shares-thoughts-of-working-with-the-extension/article_69cab1b6-f899-11e3-9d24-0019bb2963f4.html

    Gardening smarter, not harder: Adaptive gardening ideas for people with …

    Pat Patterson, a Master Gardener trained by the Oregon State University Extension Service, does not let a bad back or an artificial knee keep her from her garden.

    The enthusiastic 75-year-old maintains a 2,000-square-foot mixed ornamental and vegetable garden, a four-acre wildlife area and a Japanese garden at her property between Noti and Cheshire with the help of three friends and her husband.

    “I would be at a loss if I couldn’t garden,” Patterson said. “I would have planted at least sprouts in a pot or African violets on my windowsill, but I really wanted to grow food, and lots of it.”

    What allowed her the freedom? A concept called “adaptive gardening” involves making small modifications to accommodate a gardener’s physical injuries or disabilities.

    In her case, she has built high raised beds that make access easier. She also uses an extensive trellis system. Favorite tools include an Asian plow-hoe, a Hori-Hori soil knife and an aluminum trowel with finger indentations for a better grip.

    “We call it gardening smarter, not harder,” said Patterson, who has been sharing her knowledge with the public as a Master Gardener volunteer since 1976.

    View full sizeThe OSU Extension Service’s demonstration garden in Salem features adaptive gardening techniques.  

    Patterson chairs the adaptive gardening committee of the Master Gardeners’ Association of Lane County. Committee members give talks and help such institutions as assisted living centers make gardening more accessible to everyone.

    The OSU Extension Service offers gardening advice for the visually impaired. Here are a few of the tips from various publications available online, including one on adaptive tools:

    • Mark changes in the direction of path segments with shrubs or with different textures of the path material.
    • Make flower borders and planted beds no more than three feet across so the gardener can reach the plants while kneeling and working with short-handled tools.
    • Install wind chimes, moving water and scented plants to help the gardener find special parts of the garden.
    • Arrange bedded plants in groups of three to five in straight rows to make them easier to locate.

    Another Extension guide offers advice for adapting gardening tools for people with physical challenges, including people with arthritis, heart or lung problems, or who have trouble gripping or lifting. One guide recommends the following:

    • Use plastic handle extenders to improve leverage and keep you from having to bend over. Or use long-handled tools, which are available in many hardware stores.
    • Garden from a chair or kneeler to add comfort if you have knee problems.
    • Build raised beds or containers whenever possible to minimize bending.

    You can see such examples of adaptive gardening techniques like whiskey barrel planters, accessible table-top beds and extra-tall raised beds at various demonstration gardens maintained by Master Gardeners, including those in Benton, Douglas, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion and Washington counties.

    — Denise Ruttan

    Join the conversation at Homes Gardens of the Northwest on Facebook or in the comment section below at www.oregonlive.com/hg

    Article source: http://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/2014/06/disabled_gardeners_use_adaptiv.html

    Garden Tips: Conserve irrigation water by not wasting it

    It is estimated that more than 50 percent of the water used by an average household is used for irrigating our lawns, landscape and garden. Luckily for us, we have enough water for irrigation this year. It looked like we might have to tighten our belts in regards to watering when the snowpack was below normal in early winter. Fortunately, late winter snows in the Cascades saved us, but climatologists predict that our good fortune is not likely to last.

    It is time to start learning and practicing water conservation so we will be prepared for water shortages looming in the future. One way to conserve water is simply not to waste it. How often do you see irrigation water running down the street?

    There are easy ways to avoid this:

    — Slow down. Often water is being applied faster than it can sink into the soil, especially on sloped areas. A simple solution is to apply the water more slowly in several short runs with a short break in between until a total of 1 to 1.5 inches of water is applied. This gives the water a chance to percolate into the soil instead of running off.

    — Water only when needed. Often, residents rely on timers to turn water on and off based on a set schedule, never adjusting for weather or checking soil moisture to see if the lawn or plants actually need water. This “set it and forget it” practice is easy but wasteful. Plus, it does not encourage deep root systems or healthy plants.

    Dr. Troy Peters, Washington State University Extension irrigation specialist, notes that your lawn and garden do not need the same amount of water in the spring and fall as they do in the hot part of the summer. For example, he says lawns in Yakima “only use about .25 inch of water per week in April and October, 1.25 inches per week in May and September, 1.6 inches per week in June and August, and a little over 2 inches per week in July.”

    If you leave your controller programmed on a setting of 15 minutes each day for the entire season, you are likely using too much water in the spring and fall and too little in the middle of summer. Peters recommends resetting the timer at least once a month to adjust for the changing irrigation needs.

    If your soil is a silt-loam, Peters also recommends putting all the water needed during the week in one weekly irrigation, not a little bit each day. Peters points out that “soil can only hold so much water.” When you put on more water than the soil can hold, the excess water is wasted. During the summer, when more than an inch of water per week is needed, Peters suggests splitting the total and applying half of the water with two separate runs per week if the soil is a silt loam. However, on sandy soils, you will have to irrigate more often, but should try not to irrigate every day if possible.

    There are other ways to conserve lawn and garden irrigation water, but trying not to waste it is a good start.

    — Marianne C. Ophardt is a horticulturist for Washington State University Benton County Extension.

    Article source: http://www.bradenton.com/2014/06/20/5215646/garden-tips-conserve-irrigation.html