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Archives for June 10, 2014

Mobile app, ticketing program new to Parade of Homes – Springfield News

The Homebuilder’s Association of Greater Springfield celebrates 60 years since its charter in 1954, and for 60 years it’s been hosting an annual Parade of Homes.

“The parade is the first thing we did,” said Charlyce Ruth, chief executive officer for the HBA.

The annual Parade of Homes, June 20-22 and 27-29, is an open house event featuring constructed homes from area builders that have been landscaped and decorated using products from local businesses. Even if you aren’t in the market for a new home, Ruth said, it’s a great way to get ideas for your existing house.

Sixty years ago, the parade featured just one house, a collaboration by several builders. This year there will be 14 homes as builders scramble to finish exteriors and landscaping, delayed by rain.

The HBA Parade of Homes magazines for this summer’s event, June 20-22 and 27-29, are being delivered today and as a preview will be available at these locations: The Carpet Shoppe, Herrman Lumber Company, The Light House Gallery, Maschino’s or Meek’s. You can also find it online at www.springfieldhba.com.

New this year are a ticketing system and a mobile maps app. Both are free.

The app — available through app stores on Apple and Android systems when you search for “parade craze,” or from a link on the HBA Springfield website — will give parade-goers a map to homes, more photos of the homes and a place to share comments, which are helpful to the builders.

Ruth said the HBA hopes the app will in particular help people find the homes. It’s been a problem, Ruth said, when people put the house address into their GPS and mobile maps systems for directions. But most new homes are on acreage or on a lot in a neighborhood that hasn’t been mapped yet.

“So they drive around aimlessly lost,” Ruth said.

Parade-goers can also reserve a ticket through the app. Or they can do it online from a link at springfieldhba.com. Tickets must be secured and presented to visit the houses. If you haven’t reserved one before the parade, you can do it at the first house visited.

Reserving a ticket also enters visitors to a grill giveaway.

“This is our only way to truly track how many people are going to the parade homes,” Ruth said.

That way they can tell home builders how many people visited a house each day. And if it’s busy, parade-goers may not have time to talk to the builder. With the app, they can share feedback and comments, which is important to builders, Ruth said.

The HBA of Greater Springfield is a member of the National Association of Home Builders with headquarters in Washington, D.C. and is home to approximately 400 members, representing builders, developers, remodelers and associates in all areas of the residential construction and housing industries.

Parade of Homes

This year’s HBA Parade of Homes is 1-6 p.m. June 20-22 and 27-29.

Find and download a maps app, Parade Craze, at an Apple or Android app store to help you find the homes, or find a link at http://www.springfieldhba.com/category/shows/parade-of-homes/

Tickets are required for this year’s Parade of Homes. They are free and can be reserved through the app, through www.springfieldhba.com or at the first home visited.

For more information call 881-3711.

Article source: http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/local/ozarks/2014/06/10/mobile-app-ticketing-program-new-parade-homes/10288481/

Antiques in the Orchard

Terry and Carole Chowning moved back to Clark Fork in 2006, purchasing the home that Carol spent her teenage years in, right across the highway from a small stretch of property that butts up against a trailing edge of Howe Mountain, an area that was home to the Whitedelph silver mine. An adit of the mine was visible on the face of the mountainside, but the rest of the property was marshy and overgrown, with thick underbrush and those ubiquitous cottonwood trees.  Nonetheless, Carole loved the view and the mountain, and eventually Terry bought it for her. That began a process of clearing and planting, and today that stretch of once overgrown land is home to Annie’s Orchard, the couple’s thriving business/retirement plan.

“Terry’s had a plan the whole time,” Carole laughed one day as she sat behind the counter of the newest addition to the orchard—the antique store. Focused and driven, Terry started the orchard by offering landscaping material, expanded it with a coffee stand, and then built a gorgeous “trading post” to house studio apartments and office space available for rent, along with the antique store.

Why antiques? “We had all this stuff,” Carole said, and added that both she and Terry have a deep appreciation for history and the everyday objects left to us from previous generations.

But back up to the landscaping business, which they call Majestic Landscaping, as it’s still growing as well. Today the couple offer dirt (organic garden soil and compost, blended garden soil, and peat moss), several types of sand, decorative bark and more types of rock than you can shake a stick at—plus a boom truck if you need some help placing a gorgeous hunk of some of the local belt rocks. You can also get cedar fencing and garden beds, and even firewood. There’s equipment to rent as well.

If the place doesn’t send you running home to work on your yard, grab a cup of coffee and visit the new antique store (they’ll sell on consignment, too, so stop by if you have antique items for sale), or just enjoy the peaceful beauty the pair have created out of a former wasteland. Hundred year old apple trees (supplemented by new trees when old ones die) dot the park-like setting, calling you to sit, put up your feet, and rest a spell before getting back home to carry out all your new landscaping ideas. 

Annie’s Orchard is located on Hwy. 200 just west of Clark Fork. You can visit them online and learn more at AnniesOrchard.com

Article source: http://riverjournal.com/vivvo/news/2777-antiquesorchard_gannon_06052014.html

Students test landscaping knowledge

MORE: Read more news from Fredericksburg

North Stafford High School teacher Steve Rossi helps students (Blaine Nelson, Amanda Campisi, Danilo Scott) with stone placement in the courtyard of Eileen’s on Sunday, June 8. (RICH JOHNSON for THE FREE LANCE-STAR)

North Stafford High School teacher Steve Rossi helps students (Blaine Nelson, Amanda Campisi, Danilo Scott) with stone placement in the courtyard of Eileen’s on Sunday, June 8. (RICH JOHNSON for THE FREE LANCE-STAR)

The patio stones don’t fit perfectly into the corners. They have to be rotated, and some of the gaps will be filled with custom-cut pieces.

The four North Stafford High School landscaping students working on the project take the situation in stride and continue leveling the sand and adding more stones.

Their teacher, Steve Rossi, says obstacles often crop up on such projects.

“Sometimes, you just have to modify on the fly,” Rossi said.

RICH JOHNSON FOR THE FREE LANCE-STARStudents from the landscaping class at North Stafford High spent two weekends installing a patio, flower boxes and benches outside Eileen’s Bakery and Café in downtown Fredericksburg.

NSHS seniors Amanda Campisi, Andrea Dowdell and Blaine Nelson, and junior Danilo Scott worked with Rossi to finish the patio early Sunday.

The project, born from a conversation between bakery owner Trista Couser and Rossi, began in January.

“He mentioned how proud he was of his students and the class, and I asked if they wanted to do some work at Eileen’s,” Couser said. “Now these kids are doing something that will last.”

Rossi, who teaches the horticultural sciences and landscaping courses at North Stafford High, said that he wanted to provide the students with a real-world experience.

“They interviewed [Couser] and went through all the steps of design that a landscaper would go through with a client,” he said.

The students said it was a great opportunity to collaborate on something that had a tangible result.

Capisi, who hopes to become an entrepreneur and landscape professionally, said that they were able to incorporate the group’s ideas.

“It was good working with each other,” Dowdell said.

As the patio came together, Nelson said that some “finagling” had been necessary, but it was overall going very well.

While watching the students’ progress, Couser said the project was a great way for Rossi’s class to work with a local business.

“Because of his class, the face of my building is helping to add more beauty to downtown Fredericksburg,” Couser said. “That really makes a difference.”

This was the second public project for the seven students in Rossi’s landscaping class, who had also carried out landscaping projects at North Stafford.

Rossi, the husband of Free Lance–Star photographer Suzanne Carr Rossi, said the course provided the design expertise the kids needed. They put that instruction to the test over the two weekends of work, which involved early hours and manual labor.

Rossi said that it was easy to promise them breakfast for their work, but their willingness to show up meant even more.

“It speaks to their character, as far as I’m concerned,” Rossi said. “They make sacrifices for me, and I make sacrifices for them. They’re like my kids.”

Dawnthea Price: 540/374-5403

dprice@freelancestar.com

Permalink: http://news.fredericksburg.com/newsdesk/2014/06/09/students-test-landscaping-knowledge/

Article source: http://news.fredericksburg.com/newsdesk/2014/06/09/students-test-landscaping-knowledge/

Annual Ann Arbor Garden Walk features private homes and benefits 2 local …

Those interested in finding inspiration for their next gardening project have a chance to see six private gardens and benefit two nonprofit organizations Saturday during the 24th-annual Ann Arbor Garden Walk.

The Women’s National Farm Garden Association’s Ann Arbor branch annually holds the garden walk, which features waterfalls, ponds, arrays of flowers, trees and plants, hillside plantings and more across Ann Arbor. The 2014 walk will showcase six gardens all within walking distance of one another, as well as the public grounds of Arbor Hospice.

The six private gardens featured are located on Devonshire Road, Londonderry Road and Bedford Road in the Arbor Hills neighborhood. A Garden Walk Marketplace, offering plants, garden art and handcrafted merchandise from local and regional artists, will be located at each garden.
While giving attendees and chance to find inspiration for their own gardens, the funds raised through the Garden Walk will also benefit the Leslie Science and Nature Center (LSNC) and Edible Avalon.

Funds donated to LSNC will go toward the rejuvenation and expansion of the center’s landscaping and grounds, which serve as educational and demonstration opportunities for visitors. Edible Avalon is a nonprofit program of Avalon Housing that develops community gardens and nutrition and health-related programs for residents, as well as youth programs focused on local food and sustainable gardening.

Garden Walk tickets are $15 per person and will be sold at each of the gardens the day of the event. Tickets can be bought in advance at Dixboro General Store, Downtown Home Garden, Matthaei Botanical Gardens, Nicola’s Books, and online at Ann Arbor ‘s Farm Garden website.

The Garden Walk will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. For more information on the Garden Walk, the featured gardens or LSNC and Edible Avalon, visit www.annarborfarmandgarden.org.

Kelly McLaughlin is an intern reporter for The Ann Arbor News. She can be reached at

Article source: http://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/index.ssf/2014/06/ann_arbors_annual_garden_walk.html

From Gardening To Networking

Don’t get me wrong; planning is highly recommended and when it comes to many things – like running a business for example – action without planning is planning to fail.

But sometimes being open to whatever comes your way can have positive results you might otherwise have missed. Let me give you an example of this past weekend and how a day doing something I hadn’t originally anticipated, turned out to be a win-win situation.

I love gardening; you have to accept that premise. The home I moved into with my wife four years ago was new and the backyard a quagmire of earth, rocks and contractor fill. For the first summer, I remember digging through that mess and setting aside rocks and bricks from the land. When the sod was laid, I found myself with an emerald canvas upon which to do with as my wife and I chose.

Fast-forward to 2014 and the property is landscape;, waterfall and pond, a couple of gazebos, numerous flower gardens, a patio for eating, one for lounging, a vegetable garden, and a perimeter of emerald cedars, rocks, hanging flower baskets and shrubs. There’s a few trees, a shed, 5 bird feeders, 3 compost bins, and 7 rain barrels. There’s a connecting walkway from front to back, armour stone, and more. In short, I’ve really loved the landscaping and gardening, but now; well, it’s just about all done. Aside from the maintenance part, the creation part is pretty much complete.

Ah, but the neighbours have a blank canvas and they aren’t really gardeners. So my wife and I have been available to make little suggestions, advice and inspiration. They are a nice couple with College/University kids that come and go.

When they first moved in, the guy next door graciously trimmed my two garage doors in metal matching the home. No more painting of wood surfaces – ever! And two years ago when they moved in, I offered gardening help in return. We blow the snow out of each others driveways, and lend a hand as need be.

And so it was that on Sunday morning, the neighbour invited the two of us; my wife and I, out to the garden centre to help pick out some plants. We ended up with bags of soil, peat, plant starter, bushes, flowers, shrubs, and mulch. It took five trips in total to get all the stuff they bought. And there I was, clearing away grass, digging holes, replacing terrible soil with the good stuff, planting shrubs and flowers, watering, transplanting some things, cleaning up and all with a smile on my face.
I loved the work and the creativity, making suggestions and seeing things go from their mind to reality.

I figure in the end they got 8 hours of my time. There was no lunch break. And what did they have to pay for that labour? Nothing. The cost to them was a juice bottle, a water bottle, and a homemade dinner of filet mignon, potatoes, garden beans, and corn. Oops, throw in a can of Coke. And during dinner, I was given a dagger – (no kidding a real dagger) because he had one lying around for years and I had mentioned having a few swords in my possession so he thought I’d like it. And I do.

Now my plans on Sunday morning were to go food shopping, relax a little, play the guitar a little, and unwind. By the end of the afternoon, I was dirty, sweaty, and entirely content working with both my neighbours and having laughs along the way. After we all took a shower (sorry, not together), we were clean, rejuvenated and able to stand back and enjoy looking out on what we had created together. They appreciated our suggestions for plants that were native and would grow in the conditions we have to contend with, and I was grateful for the activity and doing something that made them so happy.

Now what about a job searching connection? Well for starters, both of us (my neighbour and me) can now attest to what the other is like to work with. Our cooperative skills, work ethic, teamwork, listening skills, labour skills, stamina, endurance, and creativity are now known to each other, bound by the experience, not just the idle claims one makes to another. If he needs a reference, I can attest to what it’s like to both live next door to him and complete a project together.

So here’s how it’s gone: We gave them the history of their home the Real Estate agent hid before they bought. He installed steel flashing around my garage: free. I shovel out his drive and he mine when the chances arise: free. I donate my time helping him with his lawn and landscaping: free. We’ve even gone golfing once this year together, and that reminds me I’m losing one game to nil.

This is how you build relationships and friendships. It’s not so much what can I get out of the guy next door, but rather, what can I do for the guy next door. When you think more about the giving than the getting, the getting usually takes care of itself and you find you both benefit.

Networking works the same way. When you are networking and building relationships in job searching, start with what you offer to others and can do for them. You may find those same people remember you and ask how they can help you in return.

Written By Kelly Mitchell

From Gardening To Networking was originally published @ myjobadvice and has been syndicated with permission.

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Article source: http://www.socialjusticesolutions.org/2014/06/10/gardening-networking/

Landscaping Mistakes to Avoid

Landscaping Mistakes to Avoid

Landscaping Mistakes to Avoid



Posted: Tuesday, June 10, 2014 12:00 am

Landscaping Mistakes to Avoid

When designing their landscapes, homeowners may envision grandiose gardens and lush lawns that are the envy of the neighborhood. But such designs can be difficult to maintain, and homeowners often find they are not worth the time or money.

Avoiding such costly mistakes allows homeowners to fully enjoy their lawns. The following are a few landscaping mistakes homeowners may want to avoid so they can spend more time enjoying their landscapes and less time working around the yard.

• Planting the wrong trees and shrubs: When planting new trees and shrubs around your property, choose varieties that won’t overwhelm the property by growing too large. Such trees and shrubs can mask other elements of a landscape, and they can also take a substantial amount of effort to maintain. Avoid spending too much time pruning trees and shrubs by opting for those that only grow to a particular size.

• Choosing non-native plants: It’s always best to choose plants that are native to a particular region. Native plants have already adapted to the local climate, meaning they can withstand the worst weather that climate has to offer without homeowners having to put in much effort. For example, if you live in an area where drought is common, avoid planting trees, shrubs, flowers, or grass that need ample amounts of water. Instead, opt for those varieties that can survive without significant amounts of water. Exotic plants might add aesthetic appeal to a property, but that appeal is often short-lived or costly to maintain when a plant is not in its native climate.

• Too much lawn: While a large and lush lawn appeals to many homeowners, a yard that is all grass can be difficult and expensive to maintain. Lawns without trees are susceptible to damage from the hot summer sun, and homeowners often respond to that threat by overwatering their lawns. Overwatering not only weakens root systems, but it also leads to higher water bills. Homeowners can downsize their lawns by planting more trees around the property, adding a garden in the backyard or even adding landscape features to their property.

• Planting without a plan: When planting new trees around a property, some homeowners plant without first considering the ideal locations for new trees. This can prove an expensive mistake. Planting too close to your house may eventually threaten your home’s foundation, as roots grow deeper and deeper into the ground. Planting too close to a home also may prove a security threat down the road, when the tree has grown to full height. Such trees may threaten the home during a storm, so consult a landscaping professional when planting new trees so the trees are located in a place that does not threaten the value of your home or the safety of its residents.

on

Tuesday, June 10, 2014 12:00 am.

Article source: http://www.courierjournal.net/community/article_60800e32-f0b8-11e3-b907-001a4bcf887a.html

Gardening tips for those with Alzheimer’s

UPCOMING EVENTS

4:00 PM – 7:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM – Survivorship Support Group

12:30 PM – 2:00 PM – The Herb Guild Garden Club Program

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM – Handheld Technologies

12:00 PM – Potluck Picnic: Protecting Your Identity from Theft

3:00 PM – 6:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

10:00 AM – 5:00 PM – Wellness Fair

11:00 AM – 5:00 PM – Individual Blessings with Divine Mother
Amma Sri Karunamayi

6:00 PM – Flag Retirement Ceremony

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

8:00 AM – 6:00 PM – One Day Meditation Retreat
with Amma Sri Karunamayi

9:00 AM – Walk to Wellness: Women’s Health – The Importance of Mammograms

9:00 AM – 3:00 PM – Project Pedal

9:00 AM – 11:00 AM – Community Bike Fair

9:30 AM – LWV – Bay Village Chapter meeting

10:00 AM – Westlake Special Olympics

10:00 AM – 5:00 PM – 9th Annual Crocker Park Fine Art Festival

11:00 AM – 2:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

11:30 AM – 5:30 PM – Planetarium Reopening Celebration

1:00 PM – 4:00 PM – 3rd Annual Lutheran Home Car Show Alzheimer’s Association Benefit

11:30 AM – 1:30 PM – Westside Professional Women’s Connection

4:00 PM – 7:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

11:00 AM – Shock Therapy Designing with Bold Annuals

6:30 PM – 8:45 PM – OGS, Cuyahoga West Chapter Meeting

11:00 AM – 10:00 PM – St. Demetrios Greek Festival

3:00 PM – 6:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

9:00 AM – Walk to Wellness: Women and Heart Disease

11:00 AM – 2:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

7:00 PM – 11:00 PM – Youth Challenge Backyard Bash

8:20 PM – 10:20 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Folks and Spokes Yoga Ride

Article source: http://www.westlakebayvillageobserver.com/read/2014/06/10/gardening-tips-for-those-with-alzheimers

Learn tips to shock your garden in June 18 program

UPCOMING EVENTS

4:00 PM – 7:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM – Survivorship Support Group

12:30 PM – 2:00 PM – The Herb Guild Garden Club Program

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM – Handheld Technologies

12:00 PM – Potluck Picnic: Protecting Your Identity from Theft

3:00 PM – 6:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

10:00 AM – 5:00 PM – Wellness Fair

11:00 AM – 5:00 PM – Individual Blessings with Divine Mother
Amma Sri Karunamayi

6:00 PM – Flag Retirement Ceremony

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

8:00 AM – 6:00 PM – One Day Meditation Retreat
with Amma Sri Karunamayi

9:00 AM – Walk to Wellness: Women’s Health – The Importance of Mammograms

9:00 AM – 3:00 PM – Project Pedal

9:00 AM – 11:00 AM – Community Bike Fair

9:30 AM – LWV – Bay Village Chapter meeting

10:00 AM – Westlake Special Olympics

10:00 AM – 5:00 PM – 9th Annual Crocker Park Fine Art Festival

11:00 AM – 2:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

11:30 AM – 5:30 PM – Planetarium Reopening Celebration

1:00 PM – 4:00 PM – 3rd Annual Lutheran Home Car Show Alzheimer’s Association Benefit

11:30 AM – 1:30 PM – Westside Professional Women’s Connection

4:00 PM – 7:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

11:00 AM – Shock Therapy Designing with Bold Annuals

6:30 PM – 8:45 PM – OGS, Cuyahoga West Chapter Meeting

11:00 AM – 10:00 PM – St. Demetrios Greek Festival

3:00 PM – 6:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

9:00 AM – Walk to Wellness: Women and Heart Disease

11:00 AM – 2:00 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Open Shop

7:00 PM – 11:00 PM – Youth Challenge Backyard Bash

8:20 PM – 10:20 PM – Village Bicycle Cooperative
Folks and Spokes Yoga Ride

Article source: http://www.westlakebayvillageobserver.com/read/2014/06/10/learn-tips-to-shock-your-garden-in-june-18-program

Garden Tips: Herbicides can curl leaves too

This is the time of year that weeds get our attention. As soon as warm weather hits, they seem to be everywhere. Then out come herbicides (weed control chemicals) aimed at killing these unwanted pesky plants in our lawns, landscapes and gardens. Unfortunately, not using these chemicals properly can injure or kill desirable plants.

Symptoms of herbicide injury vary depending on the chemical, but common culprits are the growth regulator-type herbicides used to kill broadleaf weeds, such as dandelions, in lawns. Exposure can cause leaf cupping, twisted or distorted growth, and strap-like leaves. The common growth regulator herbicides found in home garden products for lawns are 2, 4-D, MCPA, MCPP and dicamba.

These products are available in liquid or dry form. However, because of the wind, it is easy for spray to drift away from the target area. Therefore, these sprays should only be applied when there is no wind.

In our region, where it is frequently windy, this is difficult. The potential for drift can also be reduced by using large spray droplets instead of a fine mist, and applying the spray as close to the ground as possible.

The other application choice is a dry form, but desirable plants can still be damaged because of uptake of chemicals through the roots. The labels of products containing dicamba indicate that it should not be used “in the root zone of desirable plants.”

If you have trees in or adjacent to your lawn, it is almost impossible to avoid applying the chemical in the root zone. Tree root systems can extend as far as a tree is tall and even further. Garden plants situated next to a treated area could also become damaged via root uptake.

Plants can also be exposed to herbicides when grass clippings from recently treated lawns are used as mulch in the garden. Check product labels for how long you must wait before using the clippings. If you place treated clippings in a compost pile, it is best to compost them for several months before using it in the garden.

Other ways to reduce the chance of herbicide injury in the yard and garden include:

w Avoid applying herbicides in late spring and summer. They can vaporize during warm (above 80 degrees) weather and float in the air, settling down on plants a long way from the point of application and causing damage. If you plan to use liquid or dry herbicides, do it when the weather is cool in early spring or fall.

— If you have a few weeds in the lawn, spot treat them individually or dig them out. A weed popper tool works great for this.

— In landscape beds, apply a 3- to 4-inch layer of bark mulch to discourage weeds.

— In and around the vegetable and flower garden beds, use shallow cultivation or pull the weeds. I like a stirrup-type hoe with an oscillating head. Cultivate frequently to get the weeds when they are small. It is much easier.

— Marianne C. Ophardt is a horticulturist for Washington State University Benton County Extension.

Article source: http://www.bradenton.com/2014/06/06/5191128/garden-tips-herbicides-can-curl.html

Glorious restored gardens show history in living colour

Next it was back to Tylney, for an idyllic picnic lunch in the pair of
restored Italianate gazebos, with Pimm’s in hand and views over the park and
boating lakes. This was a leap backwards in time, from Edwardian garden
glory days to the 18th century and a small country mansion, West Green
House. Its garden has an equally fractured history, having been saved from
ruin by garden magician Marylyn Abbott after an IRA bomb blast. I visited
this garden three years ago to report on the garden opera season, and on
returning I was amazed to see further development – Abbott clearly isn’t one
to let the grass grow beneath her feet.

The Quinlan Terry follies, the light installations and the potager are now all
surrounded with a new streamlined bosky walk, taking you off to pastures new
with ribbons of blue Iris sibirica and ferny glades. It was Schultz who
connected the various gardens within the grounds – he was commissioned to
make alterations to the façade of the house, and to redesign the grounds in
the early 1900s – and each of these gardens has its own story to tell, its
own journey from glory to dereliction and back.

Such journeys, and how garden owners decide to travel along them, were
examined by Dominic Cole, chairman of the National Trust’s Advisory Panel
and the Garden History Society, in the talk he gave us over a glass of
champagne back at Tylney Hall. As a landscape architect he has developed the
Eden Project and Heligan with Tim Smit; designed the grounds at Lowther
Castle, the Horniman Museum and Magdalen College; worked on Trentham with
Piet Oudolf and Tom Stuart-Smith, and had a hand in one of my favourite
spots in London – the Roof Garden on Queen Elizabeth Hall.

He has also created gardens from almost everything, including china clay
craters, chicken sheds, Christmas tree plantations and local authority
tenure.

Dominic believes that although these days we have labour-saving machinery,
this cannot compensate entirely for the dramatic decrease in manpower (the
Tylney workforce, for instance, has gone from 50 to five). So we need to be
pragmatic in our restorations, aiming to capture the spirit of the past
rather than recreate its every detail. The discussion carried on over dinner
– gardeners always make interesting table companions.

When I awoke the next morning, I looked out from my four-poster on the gallery
of the Jekyll suite in a converted orangery over her Water Gardens, and
wondered whether Jekyll would have agreed with Cole’s notion that modern
gardeners should try to capture the spirit of former times.

Either way, in transforming gardens from the tortuous bedding patterns of the
Victorian era to her own light, subtle and billowy style, she has influenced
many of today’s gardeners.

*Tylney Hall Hotel, near Hook in Hampshire, is planning further Garden
Appreciation Weekends; for more information visit
tylneyhall.com
or call 01256 764881. The Manor House at Upton Grey is
open on weekdays; see gertrudejekyllgarden.co.uk.
For information about West Green House’s opera season and garden, see westgreenhouse.co.uk.

Article source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/gardenstovisit/10878915/Glorious-restored-gardens-show-history-in-living-colour.html