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Archives for May 28, 2014

JUST FOR PARENTS & KIDS: May 28


Posted May. 28, 2014 @ 6:00 am


Article source: http://plymouth.wickedlocal.com/article/20140528/NEWS/140527088/12445/LIFESTYLE

Landscaping creates little piece of heaven

Vegetation:

Clematis Jackmanii Superba (climber, purple blooms, cut back early spring, trellises)

Buxus Green Velvet (persistent shrubs, front of veranda)

Heuchera Palace Purple (persistent perennials, white blooms, purplish foliage, mass-planting, front of veranda and island)

Ribes alpinum (2 shrubs, dark green foliage turns to orangey yellow in fall, scarlet berries, trim if necessary, sides of main staircase)

Trapaeolum majus (cascading annuals, orange blooms, flower baskets)

Impatiens (annuals, white blooms, flower baskets and boxes, do not over fertilize)

Lobelia erinus Purple Star (annuals, purple florets, flower baskets)

Calibrachoa Million Bells Tangerine (annuals, orange blooms, flower boxes)

Geum borissii (persistent perennials, orange blooms, cut wilted flower after first blossoming, one or two rows, edge of path)

Ajuga reptans Black Scallop (persistent perennials, purple blooms, dark purple foliage, mass-planting, outer edge of pathway and island, cut wilted blooms after flowering)

Euonymus Emerald Gaiety (persistent shrubs, green white, under tree)

Malus Harvest Gold (medium-size tree, white blooms, golden fruits, near driveway)

Owner’s Hydrangea Annabelle (shrubs, white blooms, cut back in early spring, garage)

Miscanthus Sarabande (tall ornamental grass, slim silver green foliage, behind septic trap)

Physocarpus Coppertina (shrub, copper orange foliage, back right of septic trap)

Potentilla Abbotswood (shrub, white blooms, front of septic trap)

Salvia nemerosa Caradonna (perennials, purple blooms, front of septic trap)

Hemerocallis Orange Crush (perennials, orange blooms, front right of septic trap)

Heuchera Lime Rickey (persistent perennials, white blooms, lime foliage, front right of septic trap)

Asclepias tuburosa (several perennials, orange blooms, front left of septic trap, not shown here)

Most homes can use a little bit of help when it comes to warming up their curb appeal. If you would like some inexpensive ideas on how to improve the appearance of your home, send a clear photo of your house with your commentary to: Suzanne Rowe, designer, suro@bell.net

Article source: http://www.montrealgazette.com/homes/Landscaping+creates+little+piece+heaven/9884615/story.html

Housewarming: Landscaping creates little piece of heaven

Vegetation:

Clematis Jackmanii Superba (climber, purple blooms, cut back early spring, trellises)

Buxus Green Velvet (persistent shrubs, front of veranda)

Heuchera Palace Purple (persistent perennials, white blooms, purplish foliage, mass-planting, front of veranda and island)

Ribes alpinum (2 shrubs, dark green foliage turns to orangey yellow in fall, scarlet berries, trim if necessary, sides of main staircase)

Trapaeolum majus (cascading annuals, orange blooms, flower baskets)

Impatiens (annuals, white blooms, flower baskets and boxes, do not over fertilize)

Lobelia erinus Purple Star (annuals, purple florets, flower baskets)

Calibrachoa Million Bells Tangerine (annuals, orange blooms, flower boxes)

Geum borissii (persistent perennials, orange blooms, cut wilted flower after first blossoming, one or two rows, edge of path)

Ajuga reptans Black Scallop (persistent perennials, purple blooms, dark purple foliage, mass-planting, outer edge of pathway and island, cut wilted blooms after flowering)

Euonymus Emerald Gaiety (persistent shrubs, green white, under tree)

Malus Harvest Gold (medium-size tree, white blooms, golden fruits, near driveway)

Owner’s Hydrangea Annabelle (shrubs, white blooms, cut back in early spring, garage)

Miscanthus Sarabande (tall ornamental grass, slim silver green foliage, behind septic trap)

Physocarpus Coppertina (shrub, copper orange foliage, back right of septic trap)

Potentilla Abbotswood (shrub, white blooms, front of septic trap)

Salvia nemerosa Caradonna (perennials, purple blooms, front of septic trap)

Hemerocallis Orange Crush (perennials, orange blooms, front right of septic trap)

Heuchera Lime Rickey (persistent perennials, white blooms, lime foliage, front right of septic trap)

Asclepias tuburosa (several perennials, orange blooms, front left of septic trap, not shown here)

Most homes can use a little bit of help when it comes to warming up their curb appeal. If you would like some inexpensive ideas on how to improve the appearance of your home, send a clear photo of your house with your commentary to: Suzanne Rowe, designer, suro@bell.net

Article source: http://www.montrealgazette.com/homes/Housewarming+Landscaping+creates+little+piece+heaven/9884615/story.html

Large stones add design element to gardens

Most of us have gasped in awe and wonder at the phenomenal geological formations of Yosemite, Yellowstone or the Grand Canyon. Nature’s most breathtaking landscapes, carved by wind and water over millennia, trigger our deepest emotions. We respond to the harmonious balance of rock, plants and water and experience a kind of transcendent beauty.

Of these elements, rock is everlasting. Its mass, durability and stability are timeless and evoke a sense of reassuring permanence. In a man-made landscape, we can create a similar tranquility by incorporating natural boulders into designs.

Well-placed large stones can help achieve a sense of stability in the garden, and act as a foil for the more ephemeral plants. They will outlast every other landscaping element and convey an eternal sensibility, giving the garden metaphysical structure and balance. And, just as using native plants can integrate a garden into the surrounding natural environment, use of local stone can enhance a feeling of greater belonging in the garden’s regional context.

When properly placed, boulders can provide an artful intention in the garden, acting as focal points, framing views and providing textural contrast to companion landscape elements, as well as rhythm and context. They can be manipulated to influence a viewer’s emotional and aesthetic experience of the garden.

Be bolder with boulders

At a recent presentation to the Association of Professional Landscape Designers, Bill Castellon, boulder expert and licensed landscape contractor in the Bay Area, outlined some fundamental considerations when placing large boulders in the landscape.

• Look for rocks that appear to go together. Use all the same types of rocks – don’t mix various types, as it won’t look natural.

• Aim for stability when placing large stones. A rock should look like it’s been there forever and is not going anywhere. Burying the stones helps achieve this effect. They should also be leveled and not leaning into each other. Horizontal rocks create stability.

• When placing the stone, start with the largest focal-point specimens. Use one primary rock, then scale down to smaller-sized stones.

• Rocks should be placed at varied distances from each other and at different heights (use different shapes and sizes of stones). They should not hide each other.

• Group boulders in odd numbers.

• Rocks can be oriented to guide the viewer’s eyes toward certain garden elements. Vertical rocks block views and diagonal angles point the eye toward certain views. Try not to obscure boulders with higher plantings.

As summer approaches during this drought-plagued time in Northern California and we are called on to reduce landscape irrigation, it’s important to note that boulders are by far the most drought-tolerant natural landscape element. Large stones in the garden displace plant material and require virtually no water or maintenance – yet another reason why boulders can increase our sense of tranquility.

Sarah Herman is a landscape designer and member of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers, where she currently serves on the East Bay Chapter board as associate program coordinator. For more information, call (510) 559-4069 or visit sarahscapedesign.com.




Article source: http://www.losaltosonline.com/special-sections2/sections/your-home/47586-

RHS Chelsea People’s Choice garden to form part of larger landscaping scheme

By Sarah Cosgrove
Wednesday, 28 May 2014

The people’s favourite garden at Chelsea Flower Show will be enjoyed by a whole new set of visitors when it is rebuilt at Chavasse VC House recovery centre for forces veterans.

The Cavasse scheme with Chelsea show garden near top right hand corner

The Cavasse scheme with Chelsea show garden near top right hand corner

The Hope on the Horizon garden won a silver gilt medal before being voted People’s Choice at the show on Friday and will form part of a much larger landscape scheme at the recovery centre in Colchester, Essex.

Both show and centre garden have been designed by landscape designer Matt Keightley and built by his company building and landscaping firm Farr and Roberts, based in Maidenhead, Kent. They plan to prepare the ground over June and July and rebuild the garden in August ready for an opening in September.

The Help for Heroes charity, which sponsored the Chelsea garden through the support of The Havisham Trust, has launched a public campaign to raise £100,000 for the work.

Keightley, who at aged 29 was one of several young Chelsea first-timers to triumph at this year’s RHS show, beat six gold medal-winning gardens and Alan Titchmarsh and Kate Gould’s From the Moors to the Sea to scoop People’s Choice.

He said: “I’m absolutely thrilled. It is such an honour, and amazing to have such fantastic public support.

“We’ve had people coming over and telling us how much they love the garden all week, but I never anticipated we would actually win.”

The Chelsea garden was designed in the shape of the Military Cross, the medal awarded for extreme bravery and was partly inspired by Keightley’s brother Mike, currently serving his fifth tour of Afghanistan with the RAF.

Centre manager Steve Schollar said: “This project will deliver a raft of new recovery experiences and capabilities.”

Chavasse VC House in Colchester, Essex is part of the Defence Recovery Capability, a partnership between the Ministry of Defence and service charities, including Help for Heroes, which gives service people who have been wounded, injured or sick the support they need to return to duty or make a smooth transition to civilian life.

More than 600 have been helped so far.

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.hortweek.com/news/1296399/rhs-chelsea-peoples-choice-garden-form-part-larger-landscaping-scheme/

Landscaper helps build community garden

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MECHANICVILLE, N.Y. – For the fifth year in a row, the partnership between Kohl’s Department Stores and Chip’s Landscaping resulted in a new sustainable water feature and garden at the site of the Mechanicville Area Community Services Center (MACSC).

 

As a new spin on the annual  “Go Green” build this year, MACSC not only received a natural sustainable water garden on site, but a unique element for the center providing families and children an outdoor gathering area and educational platform. 

 

The center’s urban setting lacked an engaging green space for children to learn and experience nature hands on.  By combining the natural ecosystem of water with gardens, this “kid friendly” space will allow children to see and experience seasons of plant growth and wildlife in their natural habitats.  The green space will also provide a backdrop for sensory, inspirational and healing experiences for the many other programs serving all ages at the center.

 

 

“We especially hope the children and families discover a new love for nature and gardens through this unique water garden seen and get to experience it every day going forward right in their yard,” says Sue DuBois, project leader and co-owner of Chip’s Landscaping.

 

This year’s build was also visited by alumni Brian Nealon, CEO of the Wesley Community. The Wesley Community was the site of the first Go Green Build in 2010. Nealon joined the volunteers for lunch to share his stories and update volunteers on the impact of their water garden on the community at large.  Volunteers for the build came from Kohl’s Department stores and Chip’s Landscaping.  Lunch and a variety of garden materials were donated by many local businesses including Old Bryan Inn, Mullholland Enterprises, Cranesville Stone, Real Bark Mulch, Palette Stone, Northern Nurseries, Dehn’s Flowers, Dyers Nursery, and Kerls Electric.

 

 

Article source: http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/ll-052814-Mechanicville-Go-Green-garden-MACSC-

Your Life VIDEO: Picking and planting asparagus in your garden

DurhamRegion.com

DURHAM — Spring is here and gardeners are eager to start getting their hands dirty. However, gardeners need to be careful about what they plant since nights still tend to be cool and frost can develop. This week we are with Whitby horticulturist Ken Brown in his garden with some great tips and ideas about what to plant now, what to harvest, and things to look out for.

Mr. Brown’s web page, www.gardening-enjoyed.com, is a great source of advice, tips and updates on his own garden. He grows a wide range of vegetables and flowers in some innovative ways to maximize the use of space.

In today’s video, Mr. Brown shows you the tools you need to pick and plant asparagus. See how your asparagus can regenerate for the following year.

Series breakdown:

• Monday, May 26: Lawn

In this segment, Mr. Brown shows you how to top dress and overseed the lawn to fill in thin and bare patches, in order to restart the growing process.

• Tuesday, May 27: Asparagus

TODAY: Today’s video includes how to pick the first asparagus and how to plant your own asparagus patch.

• Wednesday, May 28: Planting cool season veggies

Mr. Brown has the tools you need in this video to plant cool season vegetables like kohlrabi, broccoli and pak choi.

• Thursday, May 29: Prune your clematis

In this video, we clean up the clematis. Mr. Brown has his plant growing up a trellis. He shows you where to cut and how much.

• Friday, May 30: The red lily beetle

With spring comes bug invasions. In this video, Mr. Brown shows you how to catch and destroy one of your garden’s arch enemies, the red lily beetle.

Is there a project or topic you would like to see us cover? Let us know what you want to learn. Drop us a line or post your information on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/newsdurham.

Designer garden pleases the judges at show

A GARDEN designer from Shiplake has been awarded for one of her latest creations.

Ana Mari Bull, of Mill Road, and design partner Lorenzo Soprani entered the Royal Horticultural Society Malvern Spring Show on May 10, where their design was named Best Festival Show Garden.

The pair have been working together for the last few years since graduating from the Oxford College of Garden Design where they completed a post-graduate course in residential landscape architecture.

Mrs Bull, who runs Ana Mari Bull Landscape and Garden Design, said: “The judges loved how we were able to tell our story in such a small space.

“They were particularly impressed with the choice of cloud pruned CarpinusBetulus trees, which attracted a lot of attention throughout the show, and also the way we had managed to make the planting seem so natural.

“The plant everyone was drawn to was a pink cow parsley called Chaerophyllum Hirsutum Roseum — they sold out of it in the floral marquee.”

Mr Soprani, who runs LSV Gardens in the Cotswolds, said their design offered a study of the relationship between man and the natural world.

He said: “The garden has a clean, geometric layout combined with neatly clipped planting to highlight the human need to organise and bring order to the natural world.

“In contrast, areas of naturalistic planting represent the uncontrolled growth that takes place when nature is left untamed. The design creates harmony and rhythm through the use of these two very different styles of planting.”

Mrs Bull is a Royal Horticultural Society-trained horticulturist whose work has been featured on Grand Designs.

She said: “We love what we do. It’s a real privilege to be able to work with a client to create an outdoor space which is personal to them, the house and its surroundings.

“Clients bring us in to help them make best use of all their outside space. Gardens are visible from every room of the house but often ignored or left to the end of a project when the entire budget has been spent.”

For more information, contact Mrs Bull at anamaribull@yahoo.com or 07876 060790 and Mr Soprani at lsv gardens@gmail.com or 07814 505762.

Published 27/05/14

Article source: http://www.henleystandard.co.uk/news/news.php?id=1467009

Garden Designs for Beauty and Function

Our organic gardens are the hub of our homestead. They serve many functions to us, like increasing our self-reliance and food security, adding to the beauty of our farm, to our health, teaching opportunities, the uniqueness of our lodging business and our very limited need of money.

When Dennis first came here 15 years ago, the driveway went straight through what’s now one of our gardens. Until a few years ago, the other garden area still was a forest floor with standing trees. Today our two gardens together measure about 8000 square feet and provide us with food year round, as well as plenty for trading and giving away.

Use Natural Materials

The overarching philosophy for our gardens, as well as for our homestead, is that maintenance and enhancement should be done as much as possible by local, free and natural materials and that aesthetics and practical functionality are inseparable. Everything around our farm should be pleasing to the eye which usually for us means being made from wood, glass or stone, have a designated location and a form and color that blends into a natural landscape. But to be fully satisfactory, all that should also work well – add to the ease with which we carry out our chores, be time saving, low maintenance, durable and beneficial for the health of our land and ourselves. Our garden design is a simple, straight-row lay out that we find both pleasing to the eye and efficient to work with. We maximize the yield by building the soil with natural material, incorporating succession planting and intensive space utilization and we minimize the work by weed prevention, moisture management (to avoid watering) and by timing our actions with the weather and seasons, to let sun, rain, heat and cool work in our favor. We don’t have a greenhouse or use row covers or plastic mulches in our garden, since they don’t meet our aesthetic ideals. The function – a longer growing season – is met by using cold frames made from wood and recycled glass that gives us overwintered greens and serves as a warm place to start our brassica seedlings.

How to Build a Garden Fence

Our garden fence is one example where form and function blends together. Deer are the greatest pest threat to our gardens and our 6 foot chicken wire fence is what it takes to keep them out. It’s sturdy, yet the wire is thin enough to make the fence basically transparent. The wooden posts and railings blends in to the homestead picture and a couple of days each year of replacing parts broken by wear or the weight of snow is all it takes for maintenance.

We prefer to use locust wood as fence posts since it’s likely to last for decades without spoiling. It grows on the island and nearby on the mainland and we’re often contacted to salvage all or parts of trees that people need to cut down. To use red oak is a compromise in quality but it grows on our land, making it a sustainable option when we need it. If the part that will be buried in the ground is thoroughly charred and it can last up to 10 years.

We dig the post holes 36 inches deep to get below the frost line and prevent the posts from heaving in spring and we use rocks as a back filler to secure the posts. Does it sound like a lot of work? Well, trust me, it is. But a fence post of the right material that is properly put in the ground will be there for decades and over the course of time it will still amount to less work (and headache) than having to redo it in 5-6 years. We run horizontal railings at 3 and 6 feet to attach the chicken wire to, they are made from dense, slow growing red spruce that we harvest from our own land. The best way to increase the longevity of the railings is to peel off about half of the bark in strips so that the wood can dry slowly and the cracks be minimal, preventing water from seeping in and rotting the wood. The gates are placed so that the gardens are accessible from several directions, which makes it both more inviting to enter and easier to work in.

The gardens are roughly divided in four different kind of areas, all with their uses. We have raised beds, open areas, beds along the fence and the paths.

Raised Beds

The raised beds are framed with logs, usually spruce or fir. They are 16 feet long and lay about 3-4 inches higher than ground level. The beds are roughly 32 inches wide, not including the logs. This kind of raised beds make the garden look tidy and symmetrical and the natural material serves a great aesthetic purpose at the same time as it’s a great divider between fertile soil and the paths. We have many guests wandering around in our gardens and they can walk freely knowing that they won’t step in a bed when they walk in the area with raised beds. We find that underneath the logs habitats for all sorts of worms, salamanders and insects are created and as the logs deteriorate fungi and micro organisms benefit the soil and the plants. Using logs this way is for us a good utilization of trees that need to be cleared out from dense areas of the woods and the logs are most always either too narrow or too low quality to use for lumber or firewood.

This type of garden beds do need some maintenance. Spruce and fir laid on the ground won’t really last more than 6 years even though we tend to leave them until it’s not much left. That means that every spring we need to replace about 5-6 logs which involves finding the trees and hauling them to our yard. A good garden bed log is reasonably straight through the desired length, 5-8 inches wide and the bark needs to be peeled off. We use wider logs too, but put them on the sawmill to narrow them down and we use the draw knife to round the sharp corners. Peeling the bark is essential to the longevity of the log, since bark that’s left will make it rot faster.

The open areas of our gardens mainly serve the purpose that the layout can be rearranged in accordance to what we want to grow there. Potatoes, for example, are most practical to grow in an open area, as are pumpkins and squash that needs a lot of space for the vines. Some of the beds in this open area remain at the same spot year after year. When I change the layout where the good top soil is thin, I take great care to hoe that soil from where I want the new path to be into the area of the bed. The change in layout does mean that what’s a path one year with foot traffic compacting the soil might be a bed the next year, but the soil is generally well drained and light and some simple work will fluff it back up.

Using the area along the fence is a great way to both enhance the beauty of the garden by framing it with lush growth and to use the already existing fence for the dual purpose of supporting plants. It’s also a way to save space – cucumbers and small fruit squash such as Delicatas and can be trained upright and pumpkins for example can be planted inside the fence in a rich bed but trained outwards to not use the garden area for the spreading vines. My tomato plants always grow too big for the standard cages and by growing them along the fence and tying the vines to it, it serves the multiple benefit of pest control, space saving and plant support.

Weed Management

We keep our garden beds well weeded and mulched. Weeds will spread – by seeds or running roots and it is little use fighting weeds that grow in the bed if the paths are not tended to. Where the paths are permanent, like in the area with raised beds, we use wood chips salvaged from sites nearby where trees been cut and chipped. In the open areas I put oak leaves in the path that I gather the previous fall that creates a solid mat and when I’m ready to change the layout of the beds next spring, the leaves will have broken down and faded into the garden residue.

A well thought through garden design will make the work enjoyable and manageable and will encourage the gardener’s presence and attention. And that, regardless of other features, can, and most surely will, increase the yield and multiply the rewards.

Article source: http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/garden-designs-for-beauty-and-function-zbcz1405.aspx

The joys of gardening grow on the young: Amount 25 to 34-year-olds spend on …

  • Frances Tophill, the horticulturalist, welcomed return to ‘homeliness’
  • Chelsea Flower Show was dominated by young designers
  • Report shows young homeowners spent an average of £747 on outdoor spaces in past year
  • Veteran designer Cleve West welcomed
    the influx of young blood
  • Gardening writer Bunny Guinness criticised ‘arrangements’ rather than designs

By
Ben Spencer
and Eleanor Harding

15:21 EST, 26 May 2014


|

17:09 EST, 26 May 2014

Forget clubs and pubs – today’s 20-somethings like nothing better than pottering in the garden.

Traditionally the domain of pensioners and the middle-aged, gardening is rapidly being taken up by a new generation of horticulturists.

The Chelsea Flower Show was dominated by young designers who received glittering accolades for their fresh ideas.

Love Your Garden presenters (from left to right) Frances Tophill, Alan Titchmarsh, Katie Rushworth and sitting in front David Domoney

Love Your Garden presenters (from left to right) Frances Tophill, Alan Titchmarsh, Katie Rushworth and sitting in front David Domoney

But ordinary people are also are also taking up gardening at a younger age, new research reveals.

A study of homeowners reveals that young people spent more than double the average on their gardens in the last year.

Experts say living the good life – exemplified by the 1970s hit show – has become more fashionable than ever before, with baking, cooking and gardening all seeing huge take-up.

Frances Tophill, the horticulturalist and presenter of ITV’s Love Your Garden, said: ‘Recently we’ve witnessed a real throwback to ‘homeliness’, with gardening, baking and cookery, to knitting and crafts coming back into popular culture.

‘It’s interesting that this trend is growing against the rise of technology and in a post-recessionary climate – there is a sense of holding on to traditional pastimes in an increasingly fast-paced, modern society.’

A national report of homeowner habits, published by Lloyds Bank Insurance, reveals that homeowners aged 25 to 34 spent an average of £747 on their outdoor spaces in the past year, more than double the average spend of £366.

The firm’s Britain at Home report revealed that 19 per cent of young homeowners now own a greenhouse and 29 per cent have invested in new plants for their gardens in the past year.

In the study of 2,000 British homeowners, a third of young people said their main drive was a love for gardening, a quarter said their primary aim was to entertain guests outdoors and 14 per cent aimed to increase their property’s value.

Tophill said: ‘With the current waiting list to snag an allotment longer than that of any new restaurant, there is no doubt that gardening is growing in popularity among a younger generation and people are enjoying spending more time outside.’

Hugo Bugg, 27, won rave reviews at Chelsea last week for his Waterscape Garden, which scooped a gold medal.

Hugo Bugg, the youngest winner of a Gold medal for his Waterscape Garden at the Chelsea Flower Show

Hugo Bugg, the youngest winner of a Gold medal for his Waterscape Garden at the Chelsea Flower Show

His achievement is all the more remarkable because this is his first time at Chelsea, after beginning his gardening career just six years ago.

He said: ‘My parents are keen gardeners, so I got into gardens growing up. We had three acres of wilderness so there was plenty to play with.

‘I love working with plants. I love the design of outdoor spaces and landscapes, playing with new materials.

‘It’s been such a buzz to have my first time here at Chelsea, although I was obviously a bit nervous.’

Hugo Bugg, the youngest ever winner of a Gold medal for his Waterscape Garden at the Chelsea Flower Show, with his proud parents Anna and Stephen

Hugo Bugg, the youngest ever winner of a Gold medal for his Waterscape Garden at the Chelsea Flower Show, with his proud parents Anna and Stephen

Other newcomers were friends Tom Prince and Alex Frazier, both aged 28, who won a gold medal and best in show for the small gardens category.

Also getting plenty of attention were Harry Rich, 26 and his brother David, 23 – the youngest gardener to have ever been given a show garden at Chelsea. Their garden, The Night Sky, was awarded a silver gilt medal.

Veteran designer Cleve West, who was awarded his fifth Chelsea gold medal with his MG garden, welcomed the influx of young blood.

Veteran designer Cleve West, who was awarded his fifth Chelsea gold medal with his MG garden, welcomed the influx of young blood

Veteran designer Cleve West, who was awarded his fifth Chelsea gold medal with his MG garden, welcomed the influx of young blood

He said: ‘It really is amazing to see such talented young designers here. I wasn’t even interested in gardening when I was their age.

‘So to see them come here and do so well is just incredible.

‘There are nice guys as well, really nice neighbours to have.’

But not all experts have been so welcoming to the young designers.

Gardening columnist Bunny Guinness, writing for The Daily Telegraph, said: ‘Garden design and horticulture are skills that are vastly improved with experience above all else, and I think this is shown in some of this year’s Chelsea show garden crop.

‘[There are] too many “arrangements” rather than designs, where many different elements and ideas have been thrown in and then glued together with a mass of planting.’

THE HORTICULTURAL CHANGE IN LAURA LURCOCK’S LIFE

Laura Lurcock in her back garden in Hove, West Sussex

Laura Lurcock in her back garden in Hove, West Sussex

Laura Lurcock used to like nothing better than going out with friends and eating in fancy restaurants.

But, at the age of 28, she has discovered a love of horticulture that a few years ago would have been seen as rather peculiar in such a young person.

Nowadays, with shows such as the BBC’s Big Allotment Challenge and Great British Bakeoff driving a renaissance in home pursuits, Mrs Lurcock is not out of place among her friends.

With husband Gary, 33, she has spent hours planting flower beds and maintaining a perfect lawn at their Brighton home.

Mrs
Lurcock, who is mother to 11-month-old Joshua, said: ‘I never knew I
would get such green fingers until we bought this house.

‘I suddenly became much more
interested in spending time in the garden and making it look nice than
going out and spending our money in restaurants.

‘It’s really satisfying to invest in your home and garden and watch your hard work pay off in the warmer months.

‘Even amongst my friends, I’m
noticing a return to spending money on more traditional hobbies like
baking and gardening instead of going out.’

Mrs
Lurcock, who is on maternity leave from her administration job at
Brighton Hove council, added: ‘We definitely see this as our
family home for the next few years and since having Josh I’ve realised
how important it is to have a space for the entire family to spend time
together.

‘We regularly have our friends and their children around and it’s so much easier to knock up a barbecue and eat outside while the kids run around and play.’

‘I can imagine that when Josh gets a bit older he’ll be begging for a slide or swing, like I did when I was little.’


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carin2014,

London, United Kingdom,

1 day ago

Gardening is such a wonderful creative pastime, an expressive way to bring colour and joy to our daily lives. It is so good that this traditional pastime is becoming increasingly appreciated by the younger generations.

Ken,

Gran _Canaria, Spain,

1 day ago

Superb news. There’s nothing like being able to plant, watch it grow, and then harvest and eat your own food. Certainly saves money.

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Article source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2639852/The-joys-gardening-grow-young-Amount-25-34-year-olds-spend-outdoor-spaces-double-national-average.html