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Archives for May 21, 2014

See How The Most Celebrated Female Bodies In Classic Paintings Would Look …

One of the core tactics in Dove’s highly influential, if also questionable, Real Beauty campaign has been shining a light on the Photoshopping of our perceptions of female beauty. The overuse of the reality-impairing photo-editing software has been derided by Dove and many others for creating unrealistic cosmetic expectations of today’s women by not presenting them authentically. One photo editor has done some further landscaping in this uncanny valley, applying modern airbrushed aesthetics to the women of yesterday–specifically those portrayed in history’s most famous art.

Lauren Wade of lifestyle blog Take Part has started taking the same Photoshop tactics that make models look like even more extreme specimens and using them on famous paintings from the Renaissance and Impressionist eras. While the painters of these periods appreciated beauty as we do, their subjects were actual women of varying shapes and would generally not, as Wade notes on the Take Part site, fit into a size zero. But with the slimming software in place and the bodies newly unblemished, Botticelli’s babes are now way more bodacious.

“We’ve taken a digital liquefy brush to the painstakingly layered oils of some of the most celebrated paintings of the female form, nipping and tucking at will,” Wade writes on Take Part. “There may be something sacrilegious in that, but the same could be said for our contemporary ideas of beauty.”

Seeing the “improved” figures in these paintings makes the imbalance in ideals crystal clear. Perhaps if the artists behind the originals saw what today’s women aspire to be instead, they would have been less inclined to immortalize that.

Have a look at more images in the slides above.

Article source: http://www.fastcocreate.com/3030854/see-how-the-most-celebrated-female-bodies-in-classic-paintings-would-look-photoshopped-like-

Anderson Twp. Garden Tour set for June 1

Hidden away from the traffic on Markley Road is a little oasis. There’s a pond and woods, but it’s in the gardens surrounding the old farmhouse where Cathy Scheller finds peace.

A Zen garden with decades old, possibly even century-old, wisteria climbing a trellis is on one corner. Irises dot almost every area of the yard, peonies line the walkways and many other plants and flowers are dispersed throughout the property.

The Schellers‘ house is one of eight on this year’s Anderson Township Garden Tour, set for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 1.

The Schellers‘ property wasn’t always full of gardens. When the family moved to Anderson Township they fell in love with the house, which was built before 1860, but there wasn’t much else in terms of landscaping.

That was unusual for Cathy and her husband Stu, who moved from a horse farm in St. Louis with many flower and vegetable gardens.

“There was nothing in the yard, and it was so sad that first spring when nothing bloomed,” she said.

So the Schellers got to work. They planted a few things here and there, but didn’t have much time to devote to the gardens until their kids were grown.

“Now I’m able to pursue my passion,” she said. “I love to divide (established plants) and cultivate from seeds. I find out where it survives and plant more of it.”

The Schellers’ property now has everything from a wildflower garden to a shade garden and part of the yard is dedicated to vegetables.

“For me my garden is my artistry, and for years no one saw it but my family,” she said. “I wanted to share it. It’s my passion and I love what I do.”

And for those who stop by on the Garden Tour, Cathy said she hopes visitors can find inspiration to incorporate or reuse on their own property.

“I hope they get ideas and aren’t afraid to try new things and experiment,” she said.

A brochure with descriptions and addresses of each garden on the self-guided tour is available online, bit.ly/ATgardens.

Want to know more about what’s happening in Anderson Twp.? Follow Lisa Wakeland on Twitter, @lisawakeland.

Participating gardens

• Clara Berger, 7415 State Road

• Judy Brandenburg, 1260 Apple Hill Road

• Marvin Collins Dean Coville, 6647 Hitching Post Lane

• Lisa Kenford, 7354 Rudgate Court

• Caroline Mueller, 5824 Forestway Lane

• Susie Peck Dan Earls, 1427 Stanley Road

• Nancy Dick Riedel, 6944 Royalgreen Drive

• Cathy and Stuart Scheller, 1016 Markley Road

Article source: http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/local/anderson-township/2014/05/21/anderson-june-garden-tour/2318202/

Connecting Brands With Cheap, Fresh and Creative Talent

Marketing

Funding and creative power from the people

100 Brilliant Companies

Only three and a half years out of film school, Landon Donoho has produced commercials for Sony’s PlayStation 4, Toyota, Gatorade and Disney. The Atlanta filmmaker’s impressive résumé was built up from posting winning entries on Zooppa, an advertising and digital marketing platform that sets up competitions to uncover new talent and save its clients hundreds of thousands of dollars.

“I didn’t have to pay my dues, build a network of connections with agencies or move to New York or L.A.,” Donoho says. “With these competitions, I can look at the creative brief posted on Zooppa, decide if I like the company, product or concept, and if I do, then take a week to go from concept to shooting to editing–using nothing more than my DSLR camera and computer.”

Donoho’s passion gets to the root of Zooppa’s success with clients that range from behemoths like Procter Gamble and Unilever to smaller, niche products such as Jones Soda. Because of Zooppa’s competitive aspect, it’s the clients’ true fans who are submitting the ads.

“It’s self-selecting,” says Zooppa founder and CEO Wil Merritt. “And in the end, a client may get 100 videos and stories that they can not only use, but also provides them with a powerful survey that actually shows them how their brand or product is perceived in the market.”

For setting up and managing a contest, the Seattle-based company charges a $50,000 flat fee (though this can vary based on the needs of the campaign); a prize pool–typically for up to 10 winning submissions–costs extra. Merritt claims that the sweet spot for a prize is $25,000 to $50,000 per campaign–a hefty sum, “but not when you consider that the average production price for a single TV commercial runs $350,000 in the U.S.,” he says. “For less than $100,000 you could get hundreds of videos and graphics to use on YouTube, in internal marketing presentations or as part of point-of-sale or trade-show displays, instead of one TV spot that may or may not work.” That’s because the client retains the rights to all the submissions, not just the winning entries.

Zooppa-sourced clips have even made it to the Super Bowl.

A Pizza Hut campaign built around football fans yelling “Hut! Hut! Hut!” pulled in more than 500 submissions; a mash-up of the clips became the pizza-maker’s ad during the 2013 game.

Since its launch in 2008, Zooppa has expanded to a staff of 20. While Merritt won’t reveal revenue, he shares that in the beginning, the average cost for a campaign was $5,000, but now it’s $70,000. Part of this growth comes from adding brand-name clients such as Bud Light and Chevron, but it also comes from his staff’s ability to design and present contests that bring out the best ideas from Zooppa’s community of roughly 240,000 filmmakers and designers around the world. “Oddly enough, the tighter and more constricting the creative brief, the more imaginative the results,” he says.

“Creatives seem to like boundaries.”

Filmmaker Donoho points out that Zooppa’s contest format guidelines make it easy for newbies to break into the business on their own terms. “Contests give me complete creative control over a project that I want to work on,” he says. “I couldn’t do that if I was buried in some agency in New York.”

More Marketing Brilliance

CrowdComfort

CrowdComfort gathers data from building tenants and office dwellers to determine their collective comfort level, converting feedback on heating, cooling and other environmental factors to improve conditions and help property owners identify potential maintenance issues, as well as energy- and operational-saving opportunities.

Crowdfynd

Crowdfynd lets users post and browse listings of lost-and-found items as well as reports of suspicious activity; monetary rewards encourage finders to return lost items.

Dragon Innovation

Led by former executives from iRobot’s Roomba team, Dragon Innovation has added crowdfunding to its services for launching innovative hardware products. In addition to design review and prep for fundraising campaigns, the company advises on scalability, marketing and taking products from prototype to high-volume manufacturing.

Estimize

The Estimize community consists of thousands of analysts, portfolio managers and traders, all of whom provide consensus on stocks and alerts on earnings forecasts. The platform claims to be more accurate than Wall Street projections 69.5 percent of the time.

Tiltor

Tiltor aims to influence crowds. Its platform seeks to quell riots and other violent behavior from within the mob itself by sending users messages from event organizers, local businesses and law-enforcement officials, and distributing location-based rewards if the throng splinters soon after.

Ubertesters

Ubertesters charges developers $20 per hour for each crowdsourced person who tests an app in beta form. The company produces a single, robust reporting screen that makes it easier for developers to see what works–and what doesn’t.

Arcbazar

Arcbazar‘s online marketplace allows clients to post architectural, interior design and landscaping projects, no matter how small, and have designers compete to produce the plan of their dreams.

Dandy

The Dandy community envisions, votes on and develops mobile apps, paying everyone involved a cut of sales based on how much they contribute to the app’s creation.

KarmaKrowd

KarmaKrowd helps crowdfunded project starters file provisional patents prior to revealing their ideas to consumers. The site also helps entrepreneurs do proper diligence on existing patents before their campaigns go live.

Grant Davis is the Tech and Money Editor for Entrepreneur Magazine.

Like this article? Get this issue right now on iPad, Nook or Kindle Fire.

This article was originally published in the June 2014 print edition of Entrepreneur with the headline: Fresh Spots.

Article source: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/233883

School invites all to tour its garden program

Brampton Guardian

BRAMPTON— Brampton’s Louise Arbour Secondary School is hosting its Community Gardening Open House Thursday to celebrate the International Day for Biological Diversity.

Families and public in the school community are invited to attend the event, featuring guest speaker Gino Piscelli of the Region of Peel, who will speak about Fusion Landscaping. This trend in landscaping and garden design brings together traditional gardens and modern, eco-friendly plants, flowers, colours and textures.

There will also be multilingual-guided tours to view a student-designed greenhouse, native species garden, vegetable garden, hybrid utility vehicle, solar heater and recycling depot.

Activities for children, such as nature crafts, seed planting and vermicomposting (composting with worms), will be demonstrated as well.

“The activities at this event will appeal to all generations in our school community,” principal Linda Galen said in a news release. “Newcomer community members will feel welcomed and included by our multilingual tours. We look forward to an evening which unites our school community in a common vision of social justice and environmental stewardship.”

Funded by the Ministry of Education Community Engagement grant, the EcoSquad at Louise Arbour has worked over the past four years to green the school grounds and create environmental awareness.

The goal is to have students consider green choices in their daily lives and career choices, said Carmelina Crupi, event co-advisor.

The open house is organized to highlight those career pathways Louise Arbour students can study and educate the community about the eco-friendly choices they can make in everyday life.

Local and partner organizations, including Cathy’s Composters, EcoSource, Toronto Region Conservation Authority, FarmStart and Canadian Tire, will also be present to provide information and connect with the school community.

Piscelli’s presentation will begin at 7 p.m. and end at 7:30 p.m. A draw for a tablet and other door prizes will also be held.

Louise Arbour Secondary School is located at 365 Father Tobin Road in Brampton.

 

 

 

 

Garden news: May 21, 2014

A section of the South Hadley Community Gardens on Route 47. 

Edible perennials Chicopee – Naturalist and landscaper John Root will present a program on “Edible Perennial: Gardening and Landscaping” on Thursday, May 29 at 6:30 p.m. at the Chicopee Parks Administration Building, 687 Front St. Learn how to establish and maintain a variety of perennials, including trees, shrubs, vines, canes, and herbaceous plants. Admission is free, all ages welcome.

Garden club plant sale Springfield – The Springfield Garden Club will hold its annual plant sale, rain or shine, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 31 at the Quadrangle at the Springfield Museums, 21 Edwards St. Parking is in the Edwards Street lot. This spring tradition and fund-raiser for the club’s scholarships will offer area gardeners a selection of annuals, perennials, herbs, shrubs, and container plantings from members’ gardens and area nurseries, a vintage garden boutique and an auction of prime plants.

Send items for Garden news to pmastriano@repub.com two weeks before publication.

Article source: http://www.masslive.com/living/index.ssf/2014/05/garden_news_may_28_2014.html

Soggy Spring Delays Landscaping

If you’re waiting for some landscape work to get done this spring you are not alone.  Soggy conditions have landscape companies backed up more than a month behind schedule.

In 46 years of landscaping, Ken Schuster, owner of Greenleaf Landscaping Gardens, has never seen a spring quite like this.

“I think the word for this year would be frustration. It’s been terrible, extreme wet, a lot of cold and late season warm up, the ground is really soggy, you can’t get equipment in and out,” says Schuster.

At Greenleaf Landscaping and Gardens though, equipment has to be used.

“This is our haul trail for bringing in our evergreen trees and burlap trees, normally this is rock hard clay soil in mid May,” says Schuster.

This spring the haul trail is a quagmire.

“A yard would look just like this if we were to go in on it at this time of the year with the conditions.,” says Schuster of the muddy mess.

Right now, Schuster says he’s at least a month behind schedule.

Customers browsing around his business tonight understand why their landscaping plans are on hold.

“It’ll have to wait, she’s pretty wet back there, we’ve had an awful spring, it’s been rain, rain, rain and before that it was snow, snow, snow,” says Al Mueske from Brillion.

“Everybody is aware of it and mostly everybody is cooperative and understanding and cutting us a little slack,” says Schuster.

Schuster knows customer patience won’t last forever.

He’s expecting, and hoping, to have crews working extra hours in the days and weeks to come.

“People have graduations and weddings and deadlines we have to meet, so yeah they’re be lots of overtime I thing when the sun shines.,” says Schuster.

Article source: http://www.wbay.com/story/25571050/2014/05/20/soggy-spring-delays-landscaping

8 Gardening Tips Every Beginner Needs

flowersSo! You’ve been admiring your neighbors’ beautiful gardens for years and decided this is the year: You’re going to take up gardening. Hooray, you’re going to love it! I hope? I love gardening, anyway. Your green-thumb happiness level depends on what kind of start you get, though. First thing to keep in mind is to start small your first year. You can get more ambitious each year as your build your expertise and confidence. Let’s get you going with some simple guidelines that will hopefully minimize frustration and maximize your efforts.

gardening tips

1. Get the DL from your neighbors. Everyone’s climate and location presents different challenges. Find out from your fellow gardeners which plants get inundated by aphids and which plants go gangbusters no matter what the weather.

2. Choose a sunny plot. Find an area that’s in the sun for most of the day. If it also gets shade for 2 or 3 hours, that’s even better. Plants usually grow more slowly in the shade, and they flower less, too.

3. Start with annual borders. Don’t get in over your head, yet. Start small, like maybe a narrow area just around your lawn or surrounding your mailbox, and plant annual flowers. These are the flowers you re-plant each year. At the garden center, ask for flowers that will bloom through summer. Petunias, zinnias, celosia, marigolds, pansies, and impatiens are usually pretty low-maintenance.

4. Use starters, not seeds. If you’re a beginner, use starter plants instead of seeds. If things go well this year, go ahead with seeds next spring (March or April, depending on your climate).

5. Measure your gardening area. How many square feet is your gardening space? Measure, and then tell the gardening center employee so they can tell you how many plants to buy.

6. Herbs before vegetables. YES, it’s amazing to grow your own food. I’ve done it, and it’s a blast. But before you go there, start small with a little herb garden: Basil, thyme, parsley, mint, and sage are pretty easy to grow, depending on where you live. Plant them in containers if you can, especially the mint, which will spread everywhere.

7. Feed your soil. Before you plant anything, mix in some compost into your soil. Talk with the garden center people about how much to use.

8. Put yourself on a watering schedule. Once you find out how often your plants need to be watered, make it part of your regular routine. Set up reminders so you’ll keep it up. Summer is a busy time of year, and it’s easy to forget to water.

Have you ever gardened before? What have you learned?

 

Image via Seres Fortier/Flickr

 

 

Article source: http://thestir.cafemom.com/home_garden/172662/8_gardening_tips_every_beginner

Gardening Tips from The Food Bank’s Farm!

EASTHAMPTON, Mass. (Mass Appeal) We went live on location the Mountain View Farm in Easthampton to show you some gardening tips and to introduce you to just one of the ways that the Food Bank of Western Mass helps people in need.

Succession Planting Tips:

  • For summer plantings, select varieties labelled “heat tolerant” or “bolt resistant”​
  • In early spring and late fall, plant cold hardy butterhead varieties.
  • ​Sow a two week supply of lettuce every other week
  • Seed your last batch of lettuce one month before the average fall frost date in your area
  • Mark your calendar with frost dates and planting reminders

Fertilizing Soil Testing Tips:

  • Collect at least one cup of soil from your garden, digging 6-8 inches deep in at least 6 different areas
  • Mix the samples together and spread on a paper bag to air dry
  • ​Send samples to your local agricultural extension for testing.
  • Add soil amendments such as compost or lime based on the results of your soil test.

Container Gardening

  • Sow loose-leaf lettuce in a well drained container at least 6 inches deep​
  • Try adding other baby greens like arugula or tatsoi to your lettuce mix
  • Fertilize with fish emulsion or compost tea when plants are 2 inches tall
  • When plants are 6 inches tall, cut leaves 1 inch above the soil
  • Continue watering the stems until plants are big enough for a second harvest

About the Food Bank Gardens:

The Food Bank Farm is a 60-acre parcel of land on the Connecticut River in Hadley. Since 1992, the land has been farmed without chemicals, pesticides, or herbicides, with the primary purpose of providing fresh, healthy produce to households in Western Massachusetts that face hunger or food insecurity. Additionally, the farm’s 60 acres are protected from any development, preserving an important riverside ecosystem.

The Food Bank Farm operates as a production farm in partnership with Mountain View Farm CSA, based in Easthampton. Mountain View Farm leases use of the land from The Food Bank, and in exchange, provides 100,000 pounds of fresh, local, chemical-free produce to The Food Bank for distribution to front-line food assistance providers and people in need throughout our region. Mountain View Farm also operates a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program out of its Easthampton farm, with CSA shares available to residents.

History of the Farm
The Food Bank Farm was started by the staff and board of The Food Bank of Western Massachusetts in 1992. We were one of the first food banks in the country to start a farm, and the Food Bank Farm spearheaded a movement to create and support CSAs in the Pioneer Valley and beyond. The farm’s 60 acres of land in Hadley is owned by The Food Bank and portions of it are cultivated with the primary goal of bringing fresh, chemical-free produce to people in need of food assistance.

Between 1992 and 2009, Michael Docter was first employed and later contracted through his company, Cultivating Solutions Inc., to operate the farm as a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program through which hundreds of general public shareholders received delicious produce each year. At the time it was founded, the Food Bank Farm was one of the first CSAs in the Pioneer Valley, and was unique in combining a CSA model with a food assistance mission. Over the course of 18 growing seasons, the Food Bank Farm provided about half its annual harvest to The Food Bank’s warehouse for distribution to people in need of food assistance.

In 2009, The Food Bank Farm ended its CSA program and shifted to a production model in partnership with Mountain View Farm, in order to focus the use of the land on providing food for people in need. The partnership allows the land to continue to be stewarded and farmed without chemicals, while providing 100,000 pounds of fresh produce to the emergency food network each season.

For more information about the decision to transition from a CSA to a production model, read our Farm Transition FAQ or contact The Food Bank.

The Food Bank Farm operates as a production farm in partnership with Mountain View Farm CSA, based in Easthampton. Mountain View Farm leases use of the land from The Food Bank, and in exchange, provides 100,000 pounds of fresh, local, chemical-free produce to The Food Bank for distribution to front-line food assistance providers and people in need throughout our region.  Mountain View Farm also operates a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program out of its Easthampton farm, with CSA shares available to residents.

The Food Bank Farm was started by the staff and board of The Food Bank of Western Massachusetts in 1992.  We were one of the first food banks in the country to start a farm, and the Food Bank Farm spearheaded a movement to create and support CSAs in the Pioneer Valley and beyond. The farm’s 60 acres of land in Hadley is owned by The Food Bank and portions of it are cultivated with the primary goal of bringing fresh, chemical-free produce to people in need of food assistance.

Between 1992 and 2009, Michael Docter was first employed and later contracted through his company, Cultivating Solutions Inc., to operate the farm as a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program through which hundreds of general public shareholders received delicious produce each year.  At the time it was founded, the Food Bank Farm was one of the first CSAs in the Pioneer Valley, and was unique in combining a CSA model with a food assistance mission.  Over the course of 18 growing seasons, the Food Bank Farm provided about half its annual harvest to The Food Bank’s warehouse for distribution to people in need of food assistance.

In 2009, The Food Bank Farm ended its CSA program and shifted to a production model in partnership with Mountain View Farm, in order to focus the use of the land on providing food for people in need.  The partnership allows the land to continue to be stewarded and farmed without chemicals, while providing 100,000 pounds of fresh produce to the emergency food network each season.

Article source: http://wwlp.com/2014/05/20/gardening-tips-from-the-food-banks-farm/

Tips for getting high yields in a small or thirsty garden

Tips for getting high yields  in a small or thirsty garden

Tips for getting high yields in a small or thirsty garden

A National Park Service worker tends to the White House kitchen garden on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C. Plants that can offer high yields with low watering include leafy vegetables such as kale, lettuce and spinach; beans, snow peas and sugar snap peas; and some varieties of cucumbers and squash.



Posted: Tuesday, May 20, 2014 12:01 am

Tips for getting high yields in a small or thirsty garden

Associated Press |


How can you get the most yield from a garden where space is limited, and water is too?

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      Tuesday, May 20, 2014 12:01 am.

      Article source: http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/life/tips-for-getting-high-yields-in-a-small-or-thirsty/article_5ab48e08-6ff3-55f5-8966-87a86e51791b.html

      Helpful tips for planting your own backyard garden

      The benefits of having your own backyard vegetable garden are plentiful, and can include significant lifestyle impacts, such as healthier eating habits, money saving perks and more.

      A Relaxing, Healthful Hobby

      Looking for a hobby that allows you to contribute to the health of your family? Take up gardening. Beyond producing nutritious foods, it can help you teach your family about local agriculture, all while basking in the tranquility of the great outdoors. Though starting your own home garden can be intimidating, there are a few simple steps to get you started. Once developed, it can yield fruits and vegetables from early spring and into the fall.

      1) Do Some Research

      Find out what vegetables grow best in your area and when is the right time to plant and harvest. Many local university extension programs have this information readily available online. For each plant, consider the amount of water needed, how much sunlight is required and if it should be started from seed or a transplanted seedling.

      2) Choose a Good Spot

      Keep in mind vegetables need at least six hours of sun each day, so plant away from the shade of buildings, trees and shrubs. Planting close to your house may make you more likely to bring your harvest right into your kitchen, and will help you remember to weed and water. Including rain and irrigation, your garden needs at least one inch of water per week. Make sure you can easily access a water supply nearby. Some products, such as an Ames NeverLeak hose reel, provide convenient hose storage and can easily reach all parts of your yard. Be sure to choose a level area of your yard so when watering it will not pool in lower areas.

      3) Clear the Area

      Use your garden hose or a string to mark the area for proper placement of your garden. Use a sod lifter or garden spade, keeping the area level and removing as little topsoil as possible. Next, use a round point shovel, such as the True Temper True American Round-Point Shovel, to dig into the soil about 12 inches, breaking it up and removing clumps. To encourage proper drainage and escape light freezes in early spring and fall, construct a raised bed by creating a border with wood slats and filling in with soil.

      4) Prepare the Soil

      Use a rake to create a smooth finish and remove debris or stones on the surface. You may want to add manure, compost or soil additives to provide additional nutrients in the soil.

      5) Plant Your Seeds

      Determine if you will be starting your plants from seeds or transplanting small seedlings. Be sure to research how much room each plant will need and plot the layout of your garden. Dig V-shaped furrows using a warren hoe or the edge of a garden hoe. Carefully distribute the seeds in the furrows evenly and in accordance with the instructions on the seed packet. Cover the seeds and pat down gently, then water thoroughly.

      Use this information for a fruitful harvest this gardening season. For more tips, visit www.AmesTrueTemper.com or www.Facebook.com/TrueTemperTools.

      Article source: http://rapidcityjournal.com/helpful-tips-for-planting-your-own-backyard-garden/article_62e3c93a-361a-50db-b968-bfecb3880b0d.html