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Archives for May 14, 2014

Price Hill Will leading redevelopment along Glenway

Price Hill Will has started its efforts to redevelop a section of the Glenway Avenue business district between the Covedale Branch Library and Price Hill Chili.

The community development organization acquired 11 parcels in the 4900 block of Glenway last year. The properties are on the east side of Glenway, surrounding Dr. Ernesto Sabato’s dental practice.

Ken Smith, executive director of Price Hill Will, said they’ve demolished two properties already and plan to raze another vacant property within the next few weeks. The demolitions and site preparation is being completed as Price Hill Will works to find a developer or developers interested in helping construct new commercial buildings in the business district, he said.

“We are open to any development that would be a benefit to the community,” he said. “It’s an exciting opportunity for the neighborhood.”

Price Hill Will worked with business and community leaders to devise a plan for the area in 2009, but Smith said the properties weren’t available at the time. Since the market has changed in the past five years, he said some of the ideas laid out in that plan may no longer be an option so the organization will again seek input from community members and business owners to identify what developments would be best for that particular stretch of Glenway.

The parcels are situated between great neighborhood anchors like the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, Price Hill Chili and the Covedale Branch Library, he said, and are near many neighborhood businesses that have been around for more than 50 years.

Whether new retail stores, new restaurants or professional offices are developed on the sites, Smith said Price Hill Will wants to make sure the new developments complement the existing businesses and institutions serving the community.

“We have really strong, longstanding businesses in the area,” he said. “This will give us an opportunity to unify those anchor businesses and make the entire neighborhood stronger.”

He envisions people coming to the neighborhood to see a show at the Covedale theater, or get a book at the library, and then being able to walk down the street to do some shopping, get a cup of coffee or grab a bite to eat.

Tim Perrino, who serves as artistic director of the Covedale theater and helped spur economic redevelopment in the business district with the revitalization of the theater more than a decade ago, said he’s thrilled Price Hill Will is working to develop the sites and hopes the organization can find the right developer and mix of businesses for the neighborhood.

“I think the theater is indicative of how this neighborhood is once again thriving,” Perrino said. “I think Price Hill Will can and will be successful in helping to re-invent this area. It will put more icing on what I think is a pretty good cake.”

He said he looks forward to seeing what’s really possible up and down the business district.

Sabato, who keeps the landscaping at his dental office meticulous and frustratingly watched properties around his office fall into disrepair, said he’s hopeful Price Hill Will can attract developments to complement his business.

“I hope they can bring in some retail business that can be here long-term, but it has to be in the best interests of the neighborhood,” he said. “It has to be good for Price Hill. If they can do that, I’ll be very happy.”

Smith said Price Hill Will is beginning to talk to potential developers and is sending out requests for proposals to developers.

He said the organization wants the redevelopment of the parcels to be practical and serve the best interests of the community.

“This would be a significant investment in the community,” he said. “It should be the absolute highest and best use it can be for the benefit of the neighborhood.”

Your turn

What kind of development would you like to see along Glenway Avenue in Price Hill?

Send your ideas to rmaloney@communitypress.com, with “Glenway Avenue” in the subject line You may also comment to this story.

Article source: http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/local/2014/05/14/price-hill-will-leading-redevelopment-along-glenway/9077245/

RISD, Brown students unveil comprehensive plan to transform Central Falls …

PROVIDENCE — The outpouring of support for Central Falls, the first city in state history to go through federal bankruptcy, has continued to blossom.

On Tuesday, urban studies and design students from the Rhode Island School of Design and Brown University unveiled the “Central Falls Comprehensive Master Plan,” to transform the 1.3-square-mile urban landscape into a picturesque oasis dotted with scores of trees, bikeways and gardens.

The plans are so ambitious it’s hard to imagine that the state’s most densely populated city with 19,400 residents wouldn’t soon become a very different place.

Elizabeth Dean Hermann, a professor of landscape architecture at RISD, said that as many as 100 students from Brown, RISD and Javeriana University in Bogota, Colombia, will flood Central Falls this summer with plans to help turn around the city that emerged from bankruptcy less than two years ago.

An influx of Colombians first settled in the city in the 1960s.

Hermann said she decided on Central Falls after speaking to Mike Ritz, executive director of Leadership Rhode Island, and meeting with Mayor James A. Diossa and Steve Larrick, the city’s planning director.

Diossa, at 28, is the youngest mayor in the state, and Larrick is a recent graduate of Brown.

“It’s a very young government that is learning through doing,” Hermann said.

She said that the youthful city leaders, including two female city councilors who are under 30, appeal to her students who feel comfortable working among other young people with innovative ideas.

Emily Maenner and Renata Robles, urban studies students at Brown, kicked off the presentation on Tuesday with RISD’s Design Social Innovation Entrepreneur Shop. They talked about seizing on the city’s small size and diverse population that is more than 60 percent Latino. Their proposals included developing the massive Conant/Coats Clark Thread Mill Complex into an enterprise zone, creating an educational core near Central Falls High School and middle school and expanding the landing enterprise zone in the north end of the city along the banks of the Blackstone River.

The north end of Central Falls borders Cumberland.

Two months ago, Roger Williams University hosted a similar program with its students to find ways to get tenants into the Conant/ Coats Clark mill complex.

Maenner and Robles also discussed beautification efforts on Cross, Summer, Cowden and High streets that run between the city’s two primary corridors: Broad and Dexter streets. Those plans include planting scores of trees, widening sidewalks and building marked bike paths on Roosevelt Avenue near the river.

“We want to create and use these spaces,” Maenner said.

The recent announcement that the Osram-Sylvania light manufacturing firm on Broad Street will soon close presented an opportunity for the city. Maenner and Robles said that they would like to see the building house artists’ studios with greenhouses and urban gardens on the property behind the manufacturing plant.

They also said that it could become a meeting place for local merchants to regularly discuss ideas to improve the local economy.

The students also talked about re-opening a movie theater on Broad Street that is now home to a Christian church and moving the Adams Memorial Library to Coggeshall Tower next to City Hall on Broad Street.

Another RISD student, Andersen Wang, had ambitious plans to turn an urban stretch of Illinois Street, where the police and fire complex are located, into lush green parks with trees and teach local residents about the benefits of horticulture. Those benefits include landscaping front yards to make the curbside view more appealing.

On Twitter:
 @billmalinowski

Article source: http://www.providencejournal.com/breaking-news/content/20140513-risd-brown-students-unveil-comprehensive-plan-to-transform-central-falls-urban-landscape.ece

RISD, Brown students unveil plan to transform Central Falls’ urban landscape

PROVIDENCE — The outpouring of support for Central Falls, the first city in state history to go through federal bankruptcy, has continued to blossom.

On Tuesday, urban studies and design students from the Rhode Island School of Design and Brown University unveiled the “Central Falls Comprehensive Master Plan,” to transform the 1.3-square-mile urban landscape into a picturesque oasis dotted with scores of trees, bikeways and gardens.

The plans are so ambitious it’s hard to imagine that the state’s most densely populated city with 19,400 residents wouldn’t soon become a very different place.

Elizabeth Dean Hermann, a professor of landscape architecture at RISD, said that as many as 100 students from Brown, RISD and Javeriana University in Bogota, Colombia, will flood Central Falls this summer with plans to help turn around the city that emerged from bankruptcy less than two years ago.

An influx of Colombians first settled in the city in the 1960s.

Hermann said she decided on Central Falls after speaking to Mike Ritz, executive director of Leadership Rhode Island, and meeting with Mayor James A. Diossa and Steve Larrick, the city’s planning director.

Diossa, at 28, is the youngest mayor in the state, and Larrick is a recent graduate of Brown.

“It’s a very young government that is learning through doing,” Hermann said.

She said that the youthful city leaders, including two female city councilors who are under 30, appeal to her students who feel comfortable working among other young people with innovative ideas.

Emily Maenner and Renata Robles, urban studies students at Brown, kicked off the presentation on Tuesday with RISD’s Design Social Innovation Entrepreneur Shop. They talked about seizing on the city’s small size and diverse population that is more than 60 percent Latino. Their proposals included developing the massive Conant/Coats Clark Thread Mill Complex into an enterprise zone, creating an educational core near Central Falls High School and middle school and expanding the landing enterprise zone in the north end of the city along the banks of the Blackstone River.

The north end of Central Falls borders Cumberland.

Two months ago, Roger Williams University hosted a similar program with its students to find ways to get tenants into the Conant/ Coats Clark mill complex.

Maenner and Robles also discussed beautification efforts on Cross, Summer, Cowden and High streets that run between the city’s two primary corridors: Broad and Dexter streets. Those plans include planting scores of trees, widening sidewalks and building marked bike paths on Roosevelt Avenue near the river.

“We want to create and use these spaces,” Maenner said.

The recent announcement that the Osram-Sylvania light manufacturing firm on Broad Street will soon close presented an opportunity for the city. Maenner and Robles said that they would like to see the building house artists’ studios with greenhouses and urban gardens on the property behind the manufacturing plant.

They also said that it could become a meeting place for local merchants to regularly discuss ideas to improve the local economy.

The students also talked about re-opening a movie theater on Broad Street that is now home to a Christian church and moving the Adams Memorial Library to Coggeshall Tower next to City Hall on Broad Street.

Another RISD student, Andersen Wang, had ambitious plans to turn an urban stretch of Illinois Street, where the police and fire complex are located, into lush green parks with trees and teach local residents about the benefits of horticulture. Those benefits include landscaping front yards to make the curbside view more appealing.

On Twitter:
 @billmalinowski

Article source: http://www.providencejournal.com/breaking-news/content/20140513-risd-brown-students-unveil-plan-to-transform-central-falls-urban-landscape.ece

Garden calendar: Gardening events for the week of May 11-May 23

Troy Garden Club: “Landscaping with Herbs for Large and Small Spaces” with Troy Huffaker, owner of DTL Herbs, Ltd. 11:45 a.m. Wed. Big Beaver United Methodist Church, 3753 John R, Troy. Guests welcome. $7 covers light lunch and lecture. Reservation required. infoandideas@aol.com. www.troygardenclubmi.com.

Waterford Garden Club Spring Plant Sale: Perennials, herbs, houseplants, crafts and baked goods for sale. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Thu.-Fri. Waterford Senior Center, 3621 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. 248-682-9450.

Spring Open House: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. Sun. On Saturday (1 p.m.), Laura Zigmanth, owner of ecoChic landscape design, will share her sustainable techniques for selecting and growing native plants that attract colorful birds and butterflies. On Sunday (1 p.m.), Susan Bryan, rain garden coordinator for the Washtenaw County Water Resources Commissioner’s Office, will present a rain garden workshop. Specialty Growers, 4330 Golf Club, Howell. Karen Bovio: 517-546-7742. www.specialtygrowers.net.

2014 Spring Perennial Plant Exchange: Sponsored by the Grosse Pointe Park Beautification Commission. Master Gardeners will be available to answer questions. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Sat. Tompkins Community Center, 14920 Windmill Pointe Drive, Grosse Pointe Park. 313-259-6363. www.detroitgardencenter.org.

Grosse Ile Garden Club Annual Perennial Exchange: 9:30 a.m. Sat. V.F.W. Post 7310, 8840 Macomb, Grosse Ile. Doors open at 8:30 a.m.. 734-283-6280.

Southfield Home Garden Expo: Various home improvement companies at the pavilion and garden/landscape vendors on the front lawn of City Hall in conjunction with the City’s traditional Southfield Flower Day event. There will be home improvement and gardening workshops and demonstrations, activities for children, onsite animal adoptions (noon-4 p.m.) and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat. Southfield Municipal Complex, 26000 Evergreen, Southfield. Free. 248-796-5130. www.cityofsouthfield.com.

Vegetable Gardens and You: Learn how to start a vegetable garden, including raised plots, mixed with herbs with vegetables. 11 a.m. Sat. Ray Hunter Florist and Garden, 16153 Eureka, Southgate. Free. 734-284-2500. www.facebook.com/rayhunterflorist.

Native plant, tree and shrub sale: There also will be live insect exhibits, book sale, Heron rookery viewing and Rosco the Clown magic show. 4 p.m. Sat. Sun. Kensington Metropark, 2240 W. Buno, Milford. Free. 810-227-8917.

Next week

Flower Day 2014: More than 15 acres of annuals, perennials, foliage, shrubbery, trees, tropical plants, flats, hanging baskets and more for sale. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Detroit Eastern Market, 2934 Russell, Detroit. Free. 313-833-9300. www.detroiteasternmarket.com.

Michigan Orchid Society Meeting: Graham Wood, owner of Lehua Orchids on the Big Island of Hawaii, will discuss breeding Maudiae type Paphs. 2:30 p.m. Sunday. First Baptist Church of Birmingham, 300 Willits, Birmingham. Free. laysorchids@hotmail.com. www.miorchids.com.

Northville’s 27th Annual Plant and Flower Sale: More than 20 local growers and greenhouses will be selling ornamental accent plants, perennials, herbs, annuals, roses, shrubs, exotic plant and trees. There also will be garden art and accessories for sale. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. May 23, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. May 24. Downtown Northville, Main Town Square, Northville. 248-349-7640. www.northville.org.

Send items to:

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Calendar

Detroit Free Press

615 W. Lafayette, Detroit 48225

E-mail: events@freepress.com

Article source: http://www.freep.com/article/20140514/FEATURES04/305140031/wildflower-garden-club-perennial-exchange-vegetable-native-plant-shrub-orchid-eastern-market

Don Davis: Gardening’s landscape has changed

Posted: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 10:41 pm

Don Davis: Gardening’s landscape has changed

Don Davis

newsadvance.com

Much has changed since I began writing this column 35 years ago. Some things are better and other things are worse.

Beautification was on the back burner in 1979. Lynchburg’s Church Street had two trees: a birch and a beech. Main Street had no trees.

No new trees were being planted along city streets. Maintenance crews spent their time cutting down American elm and Norway maple trees planted in the 1930s that were in decline and getting to be hazardous.

Beds of flowers and shrubbery along streets and highways did not exist. They were not even on the drawing board.

Today, Lynchburg has a city horticulturist, urban forester and a support staff well versed in landscaping. None of them were employed here in the old days.

In 1979, gardeners applied pesticides without worrying too much about the environment. There was no such thing as Roundup for homeowner use, but you could buy Chlordane, Kelthane and other members of the DDT family of insecticidal chemicals.

These days commercial lawn care and landscaping companies must be certified and licensed by the state if they apply chemicals to control weeds, insects and plant diseases. Back then they were free to operate without government regulation.

Pests were a problem then just as they are now. However, deer did not cause as much damage to yards because their populations were not as high as they are today

Our homes harbored no stinkbugs and there were no multi-colored Asian lady bugs swarming into houses every autumn. None of our dogwood trees had diseases like discula anthracnose or powdery mildew. Roses never had any rose rosette virus.

Fusarium wilt was the most common killer of tomatoes back in the day, and it is less of a problem today because most gardeners plant disease-resistant hybrid tomatoes. Now, we must deal with devastating bouts of late blight, a disease not seen in tomatoes around here until the 1990s.

Kentucky 31 was the only tall fescue available for planting in your lawn in 1979. Today there are hundreds of improved tall fescues, many of which are recommended by Virginia Tech’s Extension turf grass specialist due to their good performance under Virginia conditions.

Shrubbery and trees sold in pots were less common. Back then, more plants were marketed with their roots wrapped in burlap.

Today gardeners have a wider choice when it comes to buying plants and seeds. There has been an explosion of new and different products, thanks to the efforts of creative retailers.

Gardens were larger in 1979. Only a few of us had any interest in heirloom apples, tomatoes and roses.

Mulching was not a common practice. Today’s gardeners use mulch liberally to conserve water, prevent weeds and as an element in landscape design.

Weather seems to be more extreme now than it once was. Summers are hotter/cooler and dryer/wetter than they used to be, and winters have wavered between balmy and frigid.

on

Tuesday, May 13, 2014 10:41 pm.

Article source: http://www.newsadvance.com/lifestyles/don-davis-gardening-s-landscape-has-changed/article_3b032304-db11-11e3-8ba9-001a4bcf6878.html

Garden Enhances Capital Caring

Arlington’s Halquist Inpatient Center of Capital Caring, the only non-profit hospice in Northern Virginia, can be an emotionally difficult place to work, visit, and live. The six-person landscaping volunteer committee comes together to ensure that all people affected by the center — patients, employees and its neighbors — have natural gifts that make this phase of life a little more peaceful.

Saturday, May 3, was the landscaping committee’s 30th annual plant sale. The committee, which has maintained the Hospice’s well-manicured and flowered grounds for 30 years, funds its own efforts completely and raised about $3,000 this year at the sale.

“It was a good turnout with a couple hundred people there,” Diane Oermann, head of the Landscaping Committee, said. “We vary from year to year, but there are from 100 to 150 types of plants. There were trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and herbs.”

photo

Photo Conributed

The sale included native plants, herbs, perennials, annuals, shrubs, trees, bulbs, ground cover, and gardening items. All of the proceeds went to the Capital Hospice Landscape fund, which provides for maintenance of the grounds and gardens at the Capital Caring Halquist Memorial Inpatient Center.

Oermann said the annual plant sale has blossomed into something beautiful over the past three decades. It’s a good thing because the all-volunteer committee funds the landscaping efforts completely.

“In the beginning we did it from no money,” Oermann said. “People dug up things in their yard. At first all we had to sell was liriope and hostas. As the years went on, we wanted to improve the grounds further so we have added many beds.”

The landscaping committee procures the plants for the annual sale from volunteers, suppliers, and even from the hospice gardens.

“One year we had a lady who provided a bunch of vegetable seedlings,” Oermann said. “It changes from time to time. Some of the plants are divisions from the hospice grounds themselves. A lot of things come from landscape volunteers. We cannibalize our own yards. We also have a supplier to provide some of the other things.”

The landscaping is an important element of the Arlington hospice, and patients appreciate the natural aesthetic appeal it provides. One element of the garden in particular plays a major role.

“The landscape is an important part of the hospice itself,” Oermann said. “It is mainly for the patients. There is even a gazebo to accommodate two hospital beds. We have patient weddings there, baptisms and some have requested to pass away in the gazebo.”

While predominantly for patients, the gardens are also a retreat for staff members who need a break from difficult moments.

“It’s a nice place to contemplate, and this staff works under a lot of stress,” Oermann said. “The landscape restores peoples’ spirits.”

Malene Davis, president and CEO of Capital Caring at large, said the landscaping of the Halquist center is an example of the love and support of volunteers in the surrounding Community.

“At Capital Caring, our volunteers are very important to our commitment of providing world class care and service to our patients and their families,” Davis said. “My hat is off to the Arlington community and our team of volunteers for creating a beautiful garden and grounds at our Halquist Inpatient Center. From the day the former Woodlawn Elementary School was gifted as a place to provide the best in care, the armies of compassion in the Arlington community have been paramount to our mission of simply improving care to those with advanced illness.”

The overall community support, Oermann added, has been crucial to the blooming and growing garden.

“The immediate community associate, the Waycroft Woodland Civic Association, has been great, and we get people who help from all over Falls Church, Alexandria, Fairfax County, and throughout Arlington,” Oermann said. “We really appreciate the community’s support.”

The landscape volunteers are Wink Harned, Joe Pimenta, Kathryn Lahn, John Lynn and Bill Marshuetz. They work every Saturday of the year February through December to ensure the beauty of Halquist is suitable for its patients, staff and residential neighbors.

Article source: http://www.connectionnewspapers.com/news/2014/may/14/garden-enhances-capital-caring/