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Archives for March 16, 2014

Minooka Women’s Club members get gardening tips

Carolyn, a former teacher whose father was a Rosarian and hermother a Native American, credits them for her love of working with the soil, according to a news release.

Her photos were ofplants in various colors, height, shapes and textures which added interest to her garden areas along with globes, wheels, stones and pipes she designed and her husband had fashioned into water fountains.A delightful pathway made of overturned, buried wine bottles led to a bench in a quiet area of her garden.

On close inspection, creative lighting in seating areas included mason jars, wine glasses with construction paper, plastic and overturned rice bowl or custard cup shades, globes stuffed with outdoor lights and holes punched in tin cans with small battery operated candles supplying the light.

Carolyn encouraged club members to try anything and everything.She also said early spring was the time to trim back various trees, bushes and other flowering plants; clean and ready birdhouses and birdbaths; fertilize shrubs and trees; plant annual flower seeds; divide perennials and check tools.Some of Carolyn’s gardening tips included painting handles of tools to makethem easier to spot on the ground, placing small, flat rocks with names of plants in the beds, drawing a garden plan to remember the names of the plants and where they were located, creating index cards with information on light, bloom time and type of fertilizer, using vegetable oil or WD40 regularly on gardening tools and putting pennies in birdbaths to help control algae.

She said to take advantage of programs at the libraries and Joliet Junior College having to do with flower and vegetable gardening, enjoy our gardens and “at the end of the day in spring, you should smell like dirt!”

The next meeting will be on at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 1st St. Mary’s Church Hall inMinooka.The speaker will be Phil Branshaw on the subject ofFinancial/Estate Planning.All women of the Minooka, Channahon and Shorewood area are invited to attend.Visit www.minookawomensclub.com or contact mwc60447@gmail.com for information.

Article source: http://www.morrisdailyherald.com/2014/03/14/minooka-womens-club-members-get-gardening-tips/a3fpeou/

Brown is the new green

Brown is the new green

Brown is the new green

Yolanda Muñoz at her Monterey, Calif., home, where she replaced her lawn with drought-resistant plants — including the South African daisies at the top — to help save water. Many people in California are facing the reality that in the arid West, a water-gobbling swath of lawn is no longer realistic. Winni Wintermeyer/The New York Times

Brown is the new green

Brown is the new green

Yolanda Munoz replaced her lawn with drought-resistant plants, including these South African daisies, in Monterey, Calif., March 6, 2014. Many people in California are facing the reality that in the arid West, a water-gobbling swath of lawn is no longer realistic. (Winni Wintermeyer/The New York Times)

Brown is the new green

Brown is the new green

Tine Nilsen at her house, where she replaced lawns in front and back with hardscape and drought-resistant plants to help save water, in Los Angeles, March 7, 2014. Many people in California are facing the reality that in the arid West, a water-gobbling swath of lawn is no longer realistic. (Stephanie Diani/The New York Times)

Brown is the new green

Brown is the new green

Drought-resistant agave weberi at Tine Nilsen’s home in Los Angeles. Stephanie Diani/The New York Times

Brown is the new green

Brown is the new green

Drought-resistant blue senecio at Tine Nilsen’s home in Los Angeles, March 7, 2014. Many people in California are facing the reality that in the arid West, a water-gobbling swath of lawn is no longer realistic. (Stephanie Diani/The New York Times)

Brown is the new green

Brown is the new green

Cory Wechsler with her family’s garden of mostly edible plants, at her home in Oakland, Calif., March 6, 2014. Many people in California are facing the reality that in the arid West, a water-gobbling swath of lawn is no longer realistic. (Winni Wintermeyer/The New York Times)



Posted: Saturday, March 15, 2014 7:00 am
|


Updated: 4:11 pm, Sat Mar 15, 2014.

Brown is the new green

By Steven Kurutz
The New York Times

SantaFeNewMexican.com

|
0 comments

Yolanda Muñoz was leading a double life, water-wise.


As an accountant for the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District, in Monterey, Calif., Muñoz heard grim predictions of water shortages and rationing as the state’s continuing drought intensified. But each night, she returned to her home in an older neighborhood on the peninsula, which had a lawn so large and lush she and her husband, Ed, put in a bench.

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Saturday, March 15, 2014 7:00 am.

Updated: 4:11 pm.

Article source: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/life/real_estate/brown-is-the-new-green/article_2d61bbdf-8aa3-5075-ab70-0c8e8f3f3042.html

REALTORS® Home & Garden Show awarding $5000 room makeover

For those looking to put the wow factor into their home, the 90th REALTORS® Home Garden Show, presented by Unilock, has a solution that is right on the money. Celebrity designer and television’s original home stager, Roger Hazard of AE’s “Sell This House,” is coming to the rescue of one lucky homeowner.

Roger and his partner, Chris, will reward one homeowner with a total room makeover, valued at up to $5,000. The step-by-step transformation, sponsored by CertaPro Painters, will be filmed March 30 – April 1 at one chosen home in the metro Milwaukee area and featured in a future episode of Roger and Chris Hazard’s new reality show, “Roger That!”

“Renovating a home to be comfortable with a style that fits the way people live is what I enjoy most,” Chris Stout-Hazard said. “Furniture and floor plans need to fit a homeowner’s style.”

Homeowners within the metro Milwaukee area can register for the opportunity at www.rogerthat.tv/register through Friday, March 28. Submissions should include photos of the desired makeover room along with a video from the homeowner on why they should be chosen.

Regardless if their home is selected, do-it-yourself designers can still score design tips from the duo at the REALTORS® Home Garden Show. Roger and Chris Hazard will be at the show’s Solutions Stage at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Friday, March 28, and 12 p.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday, March 29. The pair will also be at the CertaPro Painters Booth #1104 before and after their presentations.

Design and garden tips from other renowned experts
Roger Hazard will not be the only guest speaker emphasizing the power of design. Throughout the show, seminars and workshops by area experts will offer space-saving tips for indoor and outdoor rooms.

Steven Katkowsky, author of “Danger Construction Zone: Your Guided Tour to a Successful Remodeling Project,” will offer ideas in kitchen, bathroom and patio upgrades from his more than 30 years of experience as a general contractor. Using an entertaining yet straightforward approach, Katkowsky will present “Kitchen Updates” at 11 a.m. Friday, March 21 and 12 p.m. Saturday, March 22, followed by “Designing Outdoor Rooms” at 3 p.m. Friday, March 21, 4 p.m. Saturday, March 22 and 12 p.m. Sunday, March 23. His last seminar, “Bath Updates,” is scheduled for 5 p.m. Friday, March 21 and 4 p.m. Sunday, March 23.

Sure to create additional buzz will be workshops on urban beekeeping from CharBee of Beepods.com at 1 p.m. Friday, March 21, as well as home entertainment center design from Kathy Vegh at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 22 and energy-saving tips from master plumber Justin Castleman and the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District at 12 p.m. Sunday, March 30.

Stein Gardens Gifts will sponsor gardening clinics with Susan Wilke of Karthauser Sons at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 22, Angela Pipito of Stein Gardens Gifts at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 23 and Nicholas Staddon of Monrovia at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 29 and Sunday, March 30. Topics will range from miniature gardening and creating the perfect bird habitat to incorporating underutilized shrubs and perennials into a landscape. Other garden seminars will include Vermiculture, Perennial Garden Design, and Do-It-Yourself Fruits from UW-Extension’s Master Gardener Program.

A complete list of workshops, as well as cooking demonstrations at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Cooking Patio, can be found at www.mkehgs.com.

Discover sustainable solutions
Tour the latest energy-saving concepts and environmentally friendly landscaping ideas at the Sustainable Solutions Park by Breckenridge Landscape. Teaching homeowners that sustainability can be both aesthetically and financially pleasing, featured applications will include gabion walls, a bubbling water feature, native plantings and permeable pavers – put to the test with twice-an-hour rainstorm demonstrations each day.

Visit the gardens and enter to win $1,000
Last, but certainly not least, is a visit to the show’s Garden Promenade. Showcasing 12 gardens and more than 10,000-square-feet of living landscape displays and outdoor sculptures, guests are invited to tour these outdoor oases and vote for their favorite. People’s Choice voters will be entered into a giveaway that will award one lucky attendee $1,000 from The Equitable Bank.

When to go
The 90th REALTORS® Home Garden Show presented by Unilock will be at State Fair Park March 21 – 30 (closed March 24 and 25). Show hours are Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesday and Thursday 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tickets are $8 for adults, free for children 12 and younger, and free for active military with ID. To learn more, go to www.mkehgs.com or call (414) 778-4929.
 

Article source: http://www.jsonline.com/250414531.html

Builders show returns to Chambersburg, highlights new trends in construction

CHAMBERSBURG The Franklin County Builders Show returned to Chambersburg this weekend after three years in Waynesboro, and brought with it, new ideas for construction and remodeling.

Some trends could be considered optimistic.

Corey Green, owner of Corey’s Construction out of Hagerstown, Md., said he has seen an increase in homes being built, compared to previous years.

“We are building more new houses this year,” Green said. “Before, we were doing renovations on older homes. People were cautious

He said this is good for not only his business, but the general area.

“Construction is a good indicator of the economy,” Green said. “It’s a good way to see how the economy is doing.”

Melody Shubert, a landscape designer who does work for Kurt’s Pond and Landscaping LLC out of Fort Loudon, said they have seen more people wanting to spend time outside by adding landscaping, flowers and other features.

“People are making the outdoors a living area,” Shubert said.

Many flowers chosen for landscaping and outdoor areas are all-season flowers, she said, with a lot of color.

“We aren’t seeing as many fountains because of the upkeep,” she said. “We are seeing more people interested in things like the bubbler rock which can be turned on and off again.”

The cold weather this year has also impacted other businesses present at the show.

“We’ve had an extended season this year,” said Brooks Whitson, a service technician with McCrae Heating and Air Conditioning. “Usually it slows down at the end of January and February. With this extreme cold weather it has been stressing the units and we have had a lot of repairs and break downs as well as more heating units being sold.”

At the show, Whitson said they had received many questions from visitors about their systems and some were interested in scheduling appointments for them to be inspected.

Many who came the event said they are gathering ideas for future projects.

Darlene Sieders, McConnellsburg, said she is looking to redo the bathroom in her home.

“We are looking at bath-fitters and maybe turning our bathtub into a shower,” Sieders said.

John Olson, Mercersburg, said that he and his wife were looking at paving their driveway.

“After this winter, we realized that it should be done,” Olson said. “It actually froze over this year.”

Donna Sommerville, executive assistant with the Franklin County Builders Association, said that they were receiving “pretty good traffic” on Saturday.

“A lot of people we have spoken with said they are glad it has been moved back,” Sommerville said. “Waynesboro was good to us but we wanted to be closer to where we are centrally located.”

The location was primarily chosen because of its location.

“It is easy access off Route 11, Interstate 81 and Route 30,” she said.

The show continues 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday.

Lauren Cappuccio can be contacted at 262-4754.

Article source: http://www.publicopiniononline.com/local/ci_25351432/builders-show-returns-chambersburg-highlights-new-trends-construction

Spring Ideas House, edible landscapes and more



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    Get fresh ideas — and a fresh dose of color — from the Bachman’s Spring Ideas House.

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    Ocean of ideas

    Weary of winter white? Bachman’s Spring Ideas House, opening this week, will display waves of Aegean aqua, as well as other shades of fresh greens and calming blues in decorated room vignettes inside the historic Bachman family home on Lyndale Avenue S. in Minneapolis.

    This season’s theme, “Aegean Oasis,” showcases eclectic decor and design trends inspired by an overseas retreat. Theme rooms include a Mediterranean-style living room layered with textured wood, raw woven materials and natural accents, a “glass garden” sunroom and a quirky “lounge” accented with glass orbs, feathers and arrows. For entertaining inspiration, professional designers have set three different spring tablescapes mingling pattern, color and floral design. The Spring Ideas House will be open daily, Thursday through April 13 at 5936 Lyndale Av. S. Tickets are $5, which includes a coupon for $5 off a $25 purchase; part of ticket proceeds go to Art in Bloom. Buy tickets online at www.bachmans.com or call 612-861-7311.

    Improve it

    Gather tips and advice for your next big or small home and landscaping project at the Home Improvement and Design Expo, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Maple Grove Community Center, 12951 Weaver Lake Rd., Maple Grove. The event includes demonstrations, seminars and new product exhibits. Cost is $6; free with a nonperishable food item. Go to www.expoguys.com or call 952-238-1700.

    Well-crafted

    Find out how the Arts and Crafts movement has connections to interior design, women’s rights and literature at a Gabberts program on the history of Arts and Crafts, 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Love Arts and Crafts stenciling? Learn how you can incorporate it into your home, 6:30 p.m. March 26. Both events are free at Gabberts Furniture and Design Studio, 69th St. and France Av. S., Edina. To register, go to www.gabberts.com or call 952-928-3123.

    Edible landscape

    Fruit and vegetable gardens not only produce ingredients for favorite dishes, but they create colorful outdoor spaces. Emily Tepe, author of “The Edible Landscape,” will explain how your garden can do double duty, including planning color and texture combinations, planting, pruning, watering, repelling pests and harvesting. The free program and book signing are from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Minnesota State Horticultural Society, 2705 Lincoln Dr., Roseville. Register at www.northerngardener.org.

    LYNN UNDERWOOD

    Avoiding kitchen mistakes

    Considering a kitchen update? A free seminar on “Top 10 Kitchen Design Mistakes” — and how to avoid them — will be offered at Crystal Kitchen Center on Saturday, 9 to 10:30 a.m. and again noon to 1:30 p.m. Design experts also will discuss the latest cabinet accessories and appliances, green design, code issues and more.

    To attend, please RVSP at 763-544-5950. Crystal Kitchen Center is located at 5620 Winnetka Av. N., Crystal.

    Kim palmer

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    Garden Q&A: Fragrance often gets short shrift – Tribune

    Question: Four years ago, we moved to a new home. Over the past few years, I’ve planted two of my favorite plants: lilacs and peonies. They have bloomed well, but the flowers have absolutely no fragrance. If anything, the lilac has an almost offensive scent. Does this have something to do with our soil or my watering or fertilization habits? Any suggestions?

    Answer: You’ve discovered a sad truth, and it’s one that is a hot topic among nursery growers and gardeners in this country and abroad. In many cases, in their quest to breed for disease resistance, large flower size, repeat blooming and growth habit, modern plant breeding has left fragrance out of the equation. The genes that control fragrance often get lost in the shuffle and are ignored in favor of breeding in some “bigger and betterâ€� trait.

    There are some stunningly beautiful new lilac and peony cultivars with huge blooms, sturdy growth and incredible tolerance to fungal diseases — but sadly, many of them lack the sweet fragrance of most old-fashioned lilacs and peonies.

    These two plant groups aren’t the only ones that have suffered. There may be more non-fragrant roses these days than those with a heady fragrance that can be enjoyed from quite a distance. Some phlox cultivars lack fragrance, as do numerous varieties of the queen of the fragrant garden, the Oriental lily. Again, scent has been accidentally bred out when selecting for other traits.

    That being said, some breeders are working to put fragrance back into the garden. They are aiming for a lovely fragrance in addition to disease tolerance, massive flowers, excellent growth habit and all the other positive traits gardeners look for. In other words, they are looking for home runs.

    The lack of scent in your peonies and lilacs has a lot more to do with the varieties you selected than your soil or maintenance habits. If you want a garden filled with fragrant peonies and lilacs, you’ll have to go back to the drawing board and seek out varieties known for their fragrance. In some cases, this may mean turning back to old, heirloom peonies like “Duchesse de Nemours,â€� “Hermoineâ€� and “Mrs. Franklin D. Rooseveltâ€� (all available from Old House Gardens, www.oldhousegardens.com, and other local and online retailers), or heavily fragranced lilacs such as “Edith Cavell,â€� “Yankee Doodleâ€� and “President Lincolnâ€� (available from Fox Hill Lilac Nursery, www.lilacs.com, and other local and online retailers).

    Add a handful of these and other fragrant varieties to your garden, but remember to be on the lookout for new introductions in the coming years that focus on disease tolerance and bloom size without forgetting the fragrance.

    Horticulturist Jessica Walliser co-hosts “The Organic Gardeners� at 7 a.m. Sundays on KDKA Radio. She is the author of several gardening books, including “Attracting Beneficial Bugs to Your Garden: A Natural Approach to Pest Control� and “Good Bug, Bad Bug.� Her website is www.jessicawalliser.com.

    Send your gardening or landscaping questions to tribliving@tribweb.com or The Good Earth, 503 Martindale St., 3rd Floor, D.L. Clark Building, Pittsburgh, PA 15212.

    Article source: http://triblive.com/lifestyles/jessicawalliser/5724965-74/fragrance-garden-lilacs