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Archives for February 17, 2014

Bryan Versteeg’s Mars One Illustrations Show Human Life On Another Planet …

MONTREAL – Bryan Versteeg hasn’t stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child — all the while dreaming of someday living in space.

He still remembers that sketch books and drawing pencils were the predominant gifts on his fifth and sixth birthdays.

So began the career of the 38-year-old Calgary space artist who’s becoming known for his futuristic out-of-this-world illustrations.

“I’ve always been seeking out the future of engineering,” Versteeg said in an interview with The Canadian Press.

Over the years, he has been inspired by magazines like Popular Science, which he collected during the 1980s and 90s. The monthly magazine has been well known for its concept drawings of flying cars and interplanetary spaceships.

“It’s a great way to look into the future,” he added.

Warp forward to Versteeg’s recent illustrations of what a human habitat on Mars would eventually look like. His Mars One conceptual designs have appeared in thousands of articles on the Internet.

Story continues below the slideshow

Loading Slideshow

  • A space station is shown in this undated handout artist’s rendering. Kalpana space station, which the artist says is his update of the space station in “2001- A Space Odyssey.” Bryan Versteeg hasn’t stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child – all the while dreaming of someday living in space.

  • A Martian space habitat is shown in this undated handout artist’s rendering. Artist Bryan Versteeg started working on the Martian space habitat after he was approached by the founders of the Mars One Foundation, which is planning a one-way mission to the red planet.

  • A space station is shown in this undated handout artist’s rendering. Kalpana space station, which the artist says is his update of the space station in “2001- A Space Odyssey.” Bryan Versteeg hasn’t stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child – all the while dreaming of someday living in space. He still remembers that sketch books and drawing pencils were the predominant gifts on his fifth and sixth birthdays. So began the career of the 38-year-old Calgary space artist who’s becoming known for his futuristic out-of-this-world illustrations.

  • A Martian space habitat is shown in this undated handout artist’s rendering. Artist Bryan Versteeg started working on the Martian space habitat after he was approached by the founders of the Mars One Foundation, which is planning a one-way mission to the red planet.

  • A space station is shown in this undated handout artist’s rendering. Kalpana space station, which the artist says is his update of the space station in “2001- A Space Odyssey.” Bryan Versteeg hasn’t stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child – all the while dreaming of someday living in space. He still remembers that sketch books and drawing pencils were the predominant gifts on his fifth and sixth birthdays. So began the career of the 38-year-old Calgary space artist who’s becoming known for his futuristic out-of-this-world illustrations.

  • Space concept artist Bryan Versteeg at work at his home studio in Calgary, Alberta on Tuesday, February 11, 2014. Versteeg hasn’t stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child – all the while dreaming of someday living in space. He still remembers that sketch books and drawing pencils were the predominant gifts on his fifth and sixth birthdays. So began the career of the 38-year-old Calgary space artist who’s becoming known for his futuristic out-of-this-world illustrations.

  • Space concept artist Bryan Versteeg at work at his home studio in Calgary, Alberta on Tuesday, February 11, 2014. Versteeg hasn’t stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child – all the while dreaming of someday living in space. He still remembers that sketch books and drawing pencils were the predominant gifts on his fifth and sixth birthdays. So began the career of the 38-year-old Calgary space artist who’s becoming known for his futuristic out-of-this-world illustrations.

  • Check out photos from the Red Planet, as taken by NASA’s Curiosity Rover.

  • This Aug. 9, 2011 image provided by NASA shows a view from the Mars Rover Opportunity from the Western rim of the Endeavour Crater.

  • This undated image provided by NASA shows the Mars rover Opportunity looking back at an outcrop where it spent the Martian winter in 2012.

  • This image provided by NASA shows a rock that the NASA Mars rover Opportunity examined in 2012.

  • This image provided by NASA shows a shadow self-portrait taken by NASA’s Opportunity rover on the Martian surface.

  • This image provided by NASA shows a panoramic view from NASA’s Mars Exploration rover Opportunity of “Solander Point.”

  • This image provided by NASA shows the late-afternoon shadow cast by the Mars rover Opportunity at Endeavour Crater. The six-wheel rover landed on Mars in January 2004 and is still going strong. (AP Photo/NASA)

  • Handout photo issued by NASA Wednesday 21 January 2004 of a image mosaic taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit.

  • Nasa undated computer generated image of what the it’s Spirit rover would look like on the surface of Mars.

  • This magnified image taken by the Mars Rover Opportunity shows evidence of past flowing water.

  • This magnified image taken by the Mars Rover Opportunity shows evidence of past flowing water.

Versteeg started working on the Martian space habitat after he was approached by the founders of the Mars One Foundation, which is planning a one-way mission to the red planet.

In December, the non-profit organization selected 75 Canadians to enter the second round of the mission’s selection process. The 43 Canadian women and 32 men were among 1,058 candidates selected.

Versteeg said he agreed with the Mars One approach, which involved sending up to six landers to the Martian surface before shipping up any humans.

They would include two living units, two life-support systems and two supply units.

“If you’re going to be putting a permanent base there, you want to make sure everything is working before people get there,” Versteeg said.

“I really believe in Mars settlement and colonization as a foothold for human beings on another planet.”

Versteeg has worked in the graphics industry for more than 20 years, as a conceptual artist in the architectural and engineering fields.

In 2011, he founded Spacehabs.com in order to focus on the conceptual visualization for space exploration.

Versteeg is also a member of the International Association of Astronomical Artists.

One of the other projects he has been working on for about two years is his “Kalpana One” Space Station.

It’s named after Kalpana Chawla, one of seven astronauts killed when U.S. Space Shuttle Columbia broke apart while returning to Earth in February 2003.

“Kalpana One” is Versteeg’s idea of what living in outer space could actually look like.

“The interior of the space station is basically a space for about 10,000 people,” he said.

“I designed the golf courses and the football fields, the farms, the recreation spaces and ponds and landscaping — it was probably 50 projects within one project.”

Versteeg’s illustrations can aptly be compared to the artwork for the iconic rotating space station in the movie “2001: A Space Odyssey.”

“They did a lot of research and they made something that was as close to realistic as possible,” he noted.

Versteeg referred to his greenery-filled “Kalpana One” space station as “2101” — 100 years after the setting of Stanley Kubrick’s science-fiction masterpiece.

“I know I’ve always wanted to live in space and so it doesn’t need to be all that incredible for me to want to live there,” Versteeg said.

“I try to create places that my wife could see herself live in.”

The futurist artist, who has been married for 10 years, began studying art and design in school at the age of 14.

He originally considered a career in architecture and learned interior design along the way.

Versteeg said a lot of research goes into his artwork and he’s always reading up on the latest cutting-edge technology.

“You try to limit yourself within the laws of physics and within existing concepts that we already understand because I really want to make sure it’s realistic,” Versteeg said.

“If a person looks at it and says: ‘That’s impossible’ right off the bat, then we’ve kind of already lost a bit of the audience.”

Catherine Hazin, director of arts and culture for the Canadian Space Society, has called Versteeg “an incredibly important Canadian artist.”

“He is really making the idea of living and inhabiting space accessible to the public,” she said in an interview. “It’s an incredibly important job that nobody has been able to do as effectively as he has until now.”

Versteeg is also one of the founders of Deep Space Industries (DSI), a company that plans to mine and utilize space resources like asteroids.

NASA is currently studying a plan to send astronauts to study an asteroid and Versteeg said DSI has been co-operating with the U.S. space agency.

“Some of the DSI guys have been consulted for NASA’s designs, but exactly how NASA is planning on doing it is up in the air,” he said.

“We have our own ideas of how we can go out and prospect and analyze and target asteroids and then return them, process them and use the resources for manufacturing.”

Versteeg has even created stunning concept illustrations of what mining in space would look like.

“I have wonderful discussions with the guys I work with at Deep Space Industries who offer incredible insight,” he said. “They kind of vet my designs and tell me what could or could not happen.”

His illustrations of space mining may not be that far from reality. DSI is facing competition from another company, Planetary Resources Inc., which also has plans to mine asteroids.

Versteeg predicted that, like Ford when the company started mass producing cars, space utilization will take off “in leaps and bounds.”

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Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/02/15/mars-one-illustrations_n_4793629.html

Landscaping, Interior Design Projects Featured at Spring Home Improvement Fair

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2-18 Community calendar

———————–TUESDAY, FEB. 18———————-

Sertoma Club • 7 a.m., every Tuesday, Truckers Inn, 2519 Lyndale Ave. N.

District One Hospital Strategic Issues Committee Meeting • 7:00 am, Merrild Conference Room.

Faribault Flyers Bike Ride • 7:50/8 a.m., Tuesdays, White Sands Trail Head Hwy. 21, 9 a.m. at DQ on Hwy. 60. Ride Sakatah Trail.

WIC Voucher Pickup • 8:15 a.m – 4 p.m. at 320 NW Third St in Faribault

Community Luncheon Buffet • 11 a.m.- 12:30 p.m., Trinity Lutheran Church, Medford, 108 3rd St. SW, Medford. Meal will include Swedish meat balls, mashed potatoes, vegetable, salads, assorted desserts and beverage. Cost isadults $8.50, children 6-12 $3.50, and 5 years and under, free.Take-outs are available. For more information, visit www.tlcmedford.org or call 451-0447.

Faribault Noon Exchange Club Meeting • noon, every Tuesday through May, Depot Bar Grill.

Red Cross Blood Drive • 12-6 p.m. at Carleton College, 300 N. College St in Northfield

Faribault Food Shelf • 1-3 p.m., every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, Faribo West Mall.

Walk-in immunization Clinic1-4 p.m. Rice County Public Health Nursing Service, 320 NW Third St in Faribault. For those without insurance coverage for vaccines or those on MA programs. $10 donation. Call for more information 507-332-6111

Rice County Genealogical Society Meeting • 2 p.m., third Tuesday of the month, Rice County Historical Society Museum, 1814 2nd Ave. NW.

Read to Molly the Dog • 3-4:30 p.m., every Tuesday, Buckham Memorial Library. Molly is a gentle Australian Shepherd/Border Collie mix who loves to listen to stories. For children in grades K-5 who struggle with reading or are unenthusiastic about reading. Call 334-2089 for more information.

Friendship House • Women’s Group, 4 p.m., 212 B Central Ave. For more information call 333-5840

Bethlehem Academy and Divine Mercy Catholic Schools Open House 5 p.m. at DMCS and 5:30 p.m.at BA.

Community Cathedral Cafe Free Suppers • 5-6:30 p.m., every Tuesday, Cathedral Guild House, 101 6th St. NW.

Bingo • 7 p.m., every Tuesday, Faribault Eagles Club, 2027 Grant St. NW, food at 5 p.m.

Harmonettes Rehearsal • 7 p.m., every Tuesday, Pleasant Manor Nursing Home.

Euchre • 7 p.m., every Tuesday, Morristown American Legion.

——————-WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19——————-

Shattuck-St. Mary’s Dome • 5:30-7:30 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and 5-6 a.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. Free and open to all runners and walkers.

Sunrise Exchange Club  7 a.m., every Wednesday, Truckers Inn Restaurant, 2519 Lyndale Ave N. Call 332-8350 for more information.

District One Hospital Finance Committee Meeting • 7 a.m., Merrild Conference Room.

Ruth’s House of Hope Annual Meeting • 8 a.m., United Methodist Church, 219 4th Ave, NW, All interested parties welcome.

WIC Voucher Pickup • 8:15 a.m – 4 p.m. at 320 NW Third St in Faribault

Spanish and English language lessons 9-11 a.m. and 1-3 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at St Vincent de Paul Charitable Services Center, 617 3rd Ave NW. Free. No registration needed.

St. Vincent de Paul Open • 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m., M-W-F, St. Vincent de Paul, 617 Third Ave. NW. Call 334-2100 to register. Donations may also be made during these hours. Call for working appliance/furniture pickup.

Faribault Diversity Coalition meeting • 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. at Basilleo’s Pizza.

O.W.L.S (Older, Wiser, Livelier, Seniors) at River Bend 12-2 p.m., Conservation-minded reading, followed by lunch, and a 30 minute long program on conservation issues with DNR Conservation Officer, Lucas Belgard. $8 for members and $10 for non-members. Lunch included. Call 332-7151 to preregister. For more information visit www.rbnc.org, on Facebook at fb.me/riverbendMN, or on Twitter @riverbendMN.

Red Cross Blood Drive • 12-6 p.m. at Carleton College, 300 N. College St. in Northfield, Minn.

Faribault Flyers Cross Country Skiing • 1 p.m., Every Wednesday, women’s ski group, 6 p.m. open skiing, both meet at River Bend Nature Center main parking lot.

Yoga Group • 2 p.m., Friendship House, 212 B Central Ave. For more information call 333-5840

Spring 2014 Paradise Center Healing Arts Gallery 5 p.m, Various artists’ from the area and the Midwest work will be on display. There will be refreshments, guided tours of the galleries, and a chance to hear about the work from the artists. Main lobby of District One Hospital.

Full Belly Soup Kitchen  5-7 p.m., every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, Cathedral Guild House, 101 6th St. NW. Full meal served. For more information, call Donna or Sheila at 331-3236.

Eagles Club • 5-7 p.m., every Wednesday, 2027 Grant St. NW. Tacos served. Euchre at 6:30 p.m.

District One Hospital Community Information Session • 6:30 p.m. Information session to discuss potential integration of District One Hospital and Allina Health, Faribault City Hall

Minnesota Nice Meeting • 7 p.m., every third Wednesday, Hope United Methodist Church, 3166 197th St. E. Operation Minnesota Nice sends care packages to soldiers serving overseas.

———————-THURSDAY, FEB. 20———————-  

Master Gardener Program at Buckham Memorial Library 6 p.m., Master Gardener Lisa Reuvers will be presenting Lazy Landscaping: practical ideas to help you enjoy and simplify your yard instead of being a slave to it. Registration is reuqested. For more information or to register, please call the library at 507-334-2089.

Faribault Fit Club.Com Free Community Workout  6:30 p.m., every Thursday, Faribo West Mall (use west entrance). Call Estelle at 507-384-1906 for more information.

Cannon Valley Civil War Roundtable monthly meeting 7 p.m., guest speaker is Brandon Peeters of Owatonna will speak about the Battle of Shiloh. Faribault Senior Citizen Center, 19 W. Division St.

 ——————-FRIDAY, FEB. 21———————-

Shattuck-St. Mary’s Dome • 5:30-7:30 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and 5-6 a.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. Free and open to all runners and walkers.

Fabulous Love Handles • 8 p.m.- 12 a.m., Faribault Golf Club. No cover charge.

——————-SATURDAY, FEB. 22———————-

Faribault Flyers Cross-Country Skiing  8 a.m., every Saturday, Bernie’s, then parking lot at 1st Ave. NE and 2nd St. NE, 9 a.m. skiing at River Bend Nature Center.

Mason Lodge #9 Meeting • 9 a.m., second and fourth Saturday of the month, Mason Lodge.

Friendship House • 10 a.m., pool and open clubhouse, 212 B Central Ave. For more information call 333-5840

Euchre tournament • 11 a.m. every other Saturday, Faribault Golf Club. For more information, call 334-3810.

Open Skate • 12:30-3:30 p.m., Faribault Area Ice Arena. Free with canned food donation. Cost is $4/person or $15/family. Punch card with 12 punches are $40. Skate rentals are available for $2.

Open Swim  1-4 p.m., every Saturday and Sunday, Faribault Community Center.

Oil Pastels Class • 1-4 p.m. Learn to use oil pastels for creating beautiful landscapes and scenes from every-day life. Bring your own oil pastels or buy a set at class for $10. Ages 8-16. Cost is $20. Sign up at the Community Center., online at www.faribault.org/parks or by phone with a credit card at 334-2064.

Eagles Club • Steak, Shrimp, or Walleye Dinner, 5-7 p.m. Served with salad bar, beverage, and desert. Cost is $11.50 for steak, $13.50 for shrimp or walleye.

Stardust Karaoke with Deb Krenske • 8 p.m., every Saturday, VFW, 422 1st Ave NW.

American Legion • 8 a.m.-12 p.m.,Faribault Girls Ruby Omelet Breakfast. Adults, $8. Kids under 12, $4.

Cooking up a Cure for Cancer Pancake breakfast• 8:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., Relay for Life team Caron Connection will serve pancakes, French toast, scrambled eggs, ham, sausage, orange juice, milk, coffee, and more. Proceeds will go to the Rice County South Chapter of the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life/Straight River Stroll. Advance Tickets are $6.75 for adults, $4 for children 10 and under. Knights of Columbus, 17 3rd St., NE

Buckham Memorial Library • Closed for inventory through March 1. Regulars hours will resume on Mon., March 3.

Shattuck-St. Mary’s Dome • 5:30-7:30 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and 5-6 a.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. Free and open to all runners and walkers.

Faribault Lions Club meeting 12 p.m., Truckers’ Inn Restaurant. Program will be “Looking Beyond Blindness”, provided by the MSAB Youth Ambassadors. Guests and prospective members welcome.

Open Skate • 12:30-3:30 p.m., Faribault Area Ice Arena. Cost is $4/person or $15/family. Punch card with 12 punches are $40. Skate rentals are available for $2.

Friendship House • 1 p.m., walking group, 212 B Central Ave. For more information call 333-5840

Hegre Lutheran Church Suprise Dinner and Auction • Menu includes lasagna, French bread, coleslaw, snicker salad, and a beverage. Cost is $8 for adults; $5 for children 12 and under; under 5 years of age are free. Proceeds will benefit Hegre’s shingling project. Hegre Lutheran Church, 51939 Hwy 56 Blvd, Kenyon

Open Swim 1-4 p.m., Faribault Community Center

Bingo at Faribault Golf Club 5 p.m., Mondays, progressive jackpot, top jackpot at $1199.

Faribault Flyers Cross-Country Skiing  6 p.m., Mondays, meet in the River Bend Nature Center main parking lot.

Beau Chant Choir Rehearsal  7 p.m., Mondays, Bethel Ridge Lutheran Church, Faribault. For more information, contact beauchantmn@gmail.com.

Cancer Support Group • 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m., third Monday of the month, District One Cancer Center lobby. Please call Erin with questions at 507.332.4721.

Cannon River Woodcarvers Meeting • 7-9 p.m., every third Monday, Ivan Whillock Studio, 122 1st Ave. NE. Call 339-0336 with questions.

Article source: http://www.southernminn.com/faribault_daily_news/news/local/article_4be4e6ba-de3c-5d07-b911-828793e0a26f.html

Delaware Botanic Gardens hosts horticultural series


By Staff reports


Posted Feb. 17, 2014 @ 12:11 pm


Millsboro, Del.

Article source: http://www.sussexcountian.com/article/20140217/CCH/140219698/1001/NEWS

Landscaper Accused of Stealing Wine, Coins, TV from Client

Naugatuck police arrested a Wallingford landscaper who is accused of stealing several bottles of wine and valuables from a client in Naugatuck.

Police said Mathieu Roussel, 29, of 72 Terrace Gardens in Wallingford, and another man were hired to do landscaping work at a Naugatuck home and are accused of stealing 50 bottles of wine, silver coins, cameras and a TV from the victim in June.

The incident happened on June 23, according to police, and Roussel has been charged with shoplifting, larceny and conspiracy.

He was released on a $500.00 court set cash bond and is due to appear in Waterbury Superior Court on Feb. 26.

Article source: http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/local/Landscaper-Stole-Wine-Coins-TV-from-Client-Cops-245826101.html

Frosts Landscape Construction lands TV garden show presented by Alan …

Frosts Landscape Construction is to create the gardens on the next series of ITV’s Love Your Garden show presented by Alan Titchmarsh.

The new series of Love Your Garden, which begins filming in the spring, will help eight deserving families by landscaping their gardens to improve their day-to-day quality of life.

Frosts Landscape Construction, part of the Frosts Group, will be responsible for designing gardens to meet the individual requirements of each chosen family and constructing them. The TV programme follows the process from start to finish and combines social interest with a horticultural and landscaping lilt.

The opportunity of working with horticultural icon Alan Titchmarsh is already creating a real buzz at Frosts. Ken White, managing director of Frosts Landscape Construction, said: “Alan is without doubt one of the most recognisable personalities in horticulture. His passion and support of the industry has been tireless. This will be the group’s first venture into the exciting world of television with its unique set of challenges.”

The Frosts Group is made up of four Garden Centres and Frosts Landscape Construction, which offers a full range of landscape construction and maintenance services to both the commercial and private sectors.

Alan Titchmarsh said: “Frosts are one of the most respected contractors in the country and I look forward to building eight stunning new gardens with them for the new series of Love Your Garden.”

Matt Young, executive producer, said: “Love Your Garden is the most watched gardening programme on television and this year ITV have set us the task of building eight gardens for the primetime series as well as a very different garden for an ITV special that will be broadcast in 2015.

“We are thrilled that Frosts, one of the best landscape contractors in the business, have accepted the challenge. When we met Ken and his team they impressed us immediately with their professionalism, enthusiasm and attention to detail. As Love Your Garden continues to go from strength to strength we look forward to working with them on what we hope will be our best series yet.”

Article source: http://www.miltonkeynes.co.uk/news/community/community-news/frosts-landscape-construction-lands-tv-garden-show-presented-by-alan-titchmarsh-1-5882881

California drought: Home gardening tips

The following information was released by Agromin.

With a dry January in Southern California and very little rain forecasted for the remaining winter months, gardeners can take steps now to ensure their gardens receive enough water to ensure a bountiful spring and summer harvest, say experts at Agromin, an Oxnard-based manufacturer of earth-friendly compost products made from organic material collected from more than fifty California cities.

Residents can obtain Agromin soil products in bulk or in bags at Rainbow Environmental Services (gate seven) in Huntington Beach, in bulk at South Coast Supply in Huntington Beach and Los Alamitos and in bags at Lakewood Nursery in Cypress.

Install a drip irrigation system: Now is the ideal time to install a drip irrigation system. These systems, available at nurseries and home improvement stores, can be elaborate or simple. They apply water directly to the base of plants. Other forms of watering increases the likelihood of evaporation and runoff. Sprinklers deposit water onto leaves where it evaporates. They often soak unnecessary portions of the yard including sidewalks, driveways and patios.

Select plants that need little water: A number of attractive drought tolerant plants thrive in Southern California. Consider planting only perennials because once established, their water needs are minimal. Some plants to consider are bear’s breech (spiral flowers bloom in late spring to late summer), kangaroo paw (long-lasting blooms come in a variety of colors), sage (numerous varieties, attractive fragrance), western redbud (magenta flowers in spring) and deer grass (dense base with slender flower stalks).

Mulch your garden: Use organic mulch around flower and vegetable gardens. Mulch traps moisture in the soil, keeps roots cool during hot spells and reduces erosion so less water is needed. As organic mulch decomposes, it releases nutrients into the soil so plants are healthier. Before mulching, remove weeds from your garden. Then apply two to three inches of mulch to discourage new weed growth and to retain moisture. Place mulch at least one inch away from stems to discourage possible rot damage to plants.

reduce lawn square footage: According to the EPA, landscape irrigation accounts for nearly one-third of residential water use. The percentage is higher in dry climates. Lawns are the biggest outdoor water users. Consider replacing all or most of the lawn’s square footage with bark, drought tolerant plants and shrubs. With water rationing a possibility, this preemptive move will keep lawns looking green and reduce water bills significantly.

Determine how much water to use: Most homeowners have a tendency to overwater. Go to Be Water Wise to calculate how much water is truly needed to water a garden. Calculations are based on location and soil make-up (sandy or clay).

For more gardening tips, go to www.agromin.com.

Featured photo

Drought-tolerant Mexican sage file photo by C.E.H. Wiedel.

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Article source: http://www.oc-breeze.com/2014/02/16/47591_california-drought-home-gardening-tips/

Garden Club speakers to focus on creating English-style landscapes

Landscape architect Renny Reynolds and horticulturist, author and historian Jack Staub will discuss classic English garden design Thursday at the annual Garden Club of Palm Beach lecture, presented at The Society of the Four Arts.

Reynolds and Staub were inspired by historic gardens in Britain during the 35-year course of creating Hortulus Farm, a 100-acre property they own and maintain in Wrightstown, Pa.

“We have always admired the English style of gardening and landscaping,” said Reynolds, who has traveled with Staub to Britain to experience many gardens throughout that country during the past decades.

The pair split their time between two homes: the Bucks County, Pa., farm and their Point Manalapan home, where they have spent winters for the past several years.

“The English perfected the principles of landscape design, such as vista, axis, enclosure, kitchen and herb gardens, water features and follies,” Reynolds said. “And we found that English gardening translates well to the American vernacular, especially in the case of our farm, which was created around a stone farmhouse dating from 1723.

“We are fascinated with the English manner of landscape design and were influenced by specific gardens we have visited, many of which are not on the typical English garden-tour circuit,” he said.

They will share images of specific British gardens and show how their features were brought to the Pennsylvania property, which consists of 22 distinctive and authentic landscaped areas.

“Renny and Jack are the ‘dynamic duo’ of garden history and design, and their Pennsylvania farmstead is simply magnificent,” said Vicky Hunt, Garden Club president. “Their knowledge about English-style gardens is deep and impressive, and their lecture should be inspiring to all of us interested in landscape design and horticulture.”

Hunt hopes that the lecture, “The Art of English Gardening,” will inspire people to visit Hortulus Farm, which was placed on the U.S. Register of Historic Places in 2004 and is an affiliate of the Garden Conservancy, with its gardens open to the public.

“This annual lecture is our club’s gift to the town of Palm Beach,” Hunt said.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachdailynews.com/news/news/local/garden-club-speakers-to-focus-on-creating-english-/ndQJQ/

TSC students take part in community garden designing

BROWNSVILLE — A group of students at Texas Southmost College has put together a number of designs for the Brownsville Wellness Coalition to consider as the next phase for the city’s community gardens begins.


The collaboration began when BWC Executive Director Melissa Delgado met Murad Abusalim, an architecture instructor at TSC who teaches the college’s Design II class.

From there, the students in his course were tasked with researching and incorporating best practices from community gardens across the country into what will be three new gardens in Brownsville.

Delgado and a group of experts will evaluate each design individually to determine which one will be chosen for the three parks.

The project was a great opportunity for students to get involved in the community, Abusalim said.

Designing for a budget of $10,000 for each garden, students got to work, taking pains to make sure each design was cost- and space-efficient while also being creative, Abusalim said.

“I can’t think of a better teaching methodology in which we can foster responsibility and social awareness while also promoting creativity,” he said.

It’s a hands-on approach that works, Abusalim said.

Students were a bit under pressure because work for the community gardens is moving very quickly, Abusalim said. But they rose to the occasion, he added.

Jose Muñoz, a 22-year-old architecture student, said he learned a lot while working on the project.

Muñoz said the students had to take into consideration wind patterns and the sun’s footprint, but the task of making the garden wheelchair accessible was the greatest lesson.

The project is close to the type of work Muñoz would like to continue in the future. Being involved in the community was one of the reasons he chose this career path, he said.

“I love this kind of assignment because you are really involved with the community,” Muñoz said. “The reason why I chose to become an architect is to have that positive impact in my community. It doesn’t matter what city or what state I’ll be at, I’m just looking at how I’m able to impact my community.”

Architecture student Aleida Gonzalez said she worked hard on the project and learned by trial and error about the requirements needed to have a successful community garden.

“It was all pure research, and the two of us learned it little by little,” Gonzalez, 22, said of working with a partner on the project. “But between each other and the other groups in class, we all supported each other.”

For Delgado, the BWC executive director, the student project allowed the designs to be out of the box.

“I was having to design them, and I was doing it block by block,” Delgado said.

Abusalim said he expects to incorporate these kinds of projects into each class he teaches.

“That’s the beauty of whenever we have service-learning projects,” Abusalim said. “(Students) want to contribute. They like to be part of positive, life-changing projects.”

Article source: http://www.valleymorningstar.com/news/local_news/article_ff28e9e2-977a-11e3-b466-001a4bcf6878.html