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Archives for November 2013

Close the Loop Celebrates 13 Year Anniversary Paving the Way for Green …

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Close the Loop Glass Mulch in River of Glass

River of Blue Glass Mulch

The manufacturer from Utah “cooks” the recycled glass to make it chunky and add pigments to make over 25 different colors.

Kunkletown, PA (PRWEB) November 30, 2013

First impressions are everything… house included. Forget boring brown mulch or traditional bark, there are countless ways you can transform your landscaping décor with the newest trend in green landscaping. Enter: glass mulch, an eco-friendly alternative created by Pennsylvania’s first Benefit Corporation, Close the Loop, which recently celebrated its 13th year in business. Recycled glass mulch and other recycled products not only alleviates pressure from the planet but also adds some well-needed sparkle to a person’s landscaping.

Each year, over 41 billion glass containers are made, and only 30 percent of those go to recycling. Glass takes over 1,000 years to decompose, thus you’ll be able to get the best use out of the product without having to generate any waste. Mulch reduces moisture loss in soil by impeding the water evaporation process. Covering area with mulch also reduces the amount of weeds because weed seeds need sunlight to grow and the mulch blocks sunlight.

Close the Loop partnered with a glass mulch manufacturer from Utah who “cooks” the 100 percent recycled glass to make it chunky and add pigments to make over 25 different colors. It is then rough tumbled to remove virtually all sharp edges and it never fades in color. Close the Loop also works with an east coast glass pulverizing plant which produces the Pennsylvania Blue Glass mulch made from glass bottles.

Close the Loop Company has always had a vested interest in waste issues, and constantly researches solutions from individuals and companies finding new uses for waste, which is viewed as valuable unprocessed raw materials. Getting this raw material in to the hands of the companies that can do something useful with it not only cleans up environmental problems, but creates much needed family sustaining jobs and improves the economy. That’s where they come in to help build the market for new materials and product ideas. To accept and incorporate recycled products into landscapes encourages architects, builders and homeowners to specify recycled products for their homes and businesses.

From fire pits to fish ponds, garden glass mulch offers countless opportunities for exquisite outside (and even inside) décor. Case in point: a mermaid swims in blue glass mulch. Glass mulch also proves to be an easy transformation tool for parts of the home that may not be up to par. Zen gardens look elegant with a circle of PA Blue Glass sand and statues. Glass mulch has been used as a garden pathway to reduce weeds and slugs (which do not like going over the glass) in addition to replacing leaky old bird baths and faux fountains. The best part: glass mulch makeovers are virtually maintenance free (think no mosquitoes, bugs and other uninvited guests). When it comes to interior decorating, glass mulch can transform terrariums, aquariums, flower arrangements and picture frame borders.

Close the Loop Company introduced landscape garden glass colors in small, medium and large sizes. The plant operates several glass-melting furnaces and colors the glass with proprietary methods and formulations. From clear Caribbean crystal turquoise to cranberry red and bright yellow hues, these garden glass colors work for every design aesthetic. The glass mulch comes in multiple sizes (anywhere from fine sand to large golf-ball like pieces). The smaller sizes can be used in between stepping stones to add a splash of color, or the terrazzo glass can be embedded in concrete walkways, floors, countertops, workshop tabletops, and more. The landscape glass mulch can be used loose on a pathway or bound together with an epoxy adhesive if a solid surface is desired. The loose landscape glass stays in place well when using a leaf blower to remove leaf debris from the glass mulch. By adding a statue like a mermaid swimming, fisherman fishing, alligators or other statues makes the vibrant blue glass a unique conversation piece.

In an era of extreme makeovers, there’s no material more necessary for dingy fireplaces and outdoor fire pits than glass. Glass replaces fire logs and cinders with a customizable array of colors. Suggestions include Sunshine Mix in a living room, Caribbean Mix near a zero-edge swimming pool or Amber near a rustic flagstone patio. Natural gas fuel provides a consistent and clean-burning full with a flame temperature well below the softening or melting point of glass. Custom homes, restaurants and resorts have incorporated glass in a stunning and intriguing atmosphere.

Since glass takes over 1,000 years to decompose, glass mulch décor never needs to be replaced, nor does it fade from sunlight exposure. Incorporating glass mulch can enhance your home and shelter lifestyle without harming the environment… making it a great first impression for your guests, not to mention a lasting one.

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Article source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/12/prweb11380528.htm

Secret corners of Rome



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    Frescoes fill the walls and ceiling at Villa d’Este, well worth the 20-mile trip from Rome.

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    Cul De Sac

    Cork dorks should head posthaste to Cul de Sac (Piazza di Pasquino 73; www.enotecaculdesac.com), to sample scores of wines they can’t get in Minnesota (start with a glass of the cesanese, although it’s impossible to order poorly here). But this locals-laden enoteca has way more to offer: a locavore menu with eight kinds of pâté, sundry salumi and cheese and homemade pasta, friendly service (a waiter actually asked an indecisive customer how much she wanted to spend on wine) and a fabulous vibe inside and out.

    Tucked into a prototypically quaint but preternaturally quiet piazza a block west of the Piazza Navona, Cul de Sac’s outdoor tables are filled by 7 p.m., which is still happy hour for Romans. The booths inside rest under shelves of bottles reaching to the 12-foot-high ceiling, with the nets in between to keep any errant bottles from conking customers on the head.

    Jewish Ghetto

    At a couple of entrances to the Jewish Ghetto, you must pass through turnstiles (no coins needed) that we dubbed “pedestrian roundabouts.” Sadly, the Jews who were forced to live in this flood plain near the Tiber River in the 16th century (after two millenniums of being a free community), had to come in and out through locked gates in massive walls.

    The walls came down in the late 19th century, and a stately, imposing synagogue (Lungotevere Dè Cenci) went up on the neighborhood’s edge. The old ghetto now has a few Jewish merchants and restaurants serving Roman Jewish specialties. Don’t miss the fried artichokes at Giggetto (Vie del Portico d’Ottavia 21; www.giggettoalportico.it), and walk off your meal on tree-lined riverside Longotevere de Cenci.

    Villa d’Este

    Villa d’Este’s array of eye-popping frescoes are almost worth the 20-mile trek from Rome to Tivoli by themselves. The grandiose fountains in the “back yard” more than cinch the deal.

    Installed by one Cardinal Ippolito II d’Este, the son of Lucrezia Borgia, these 25 acres of waterworks (Piazza Trento, Tivoli; www.villadestetivoli.info) use ancient Roman hydraulic-engineering principles and range from the simple to the massive, from an endless row of smaller jet streams to a multifaceted “nymphaeum.” These spigots aside, the gardens include lovely landscaping and some gravity-defying trees. Similar landscapes are depicted inside, spread through a suite of art-filled rooms that, were they housed in Rome, would be anything but “hidden.”

     

    Dagnino

    Taking a hungry kid to Pasticceria Dagnino (Via V. Emanuele Orlando 75; www.pasticceriadagnino.com) would easily make the shortlist of Worst Ideas Ever. Popping in as an even slightly ravenous adult isn’t such a grand notion, either. The almost unending assortment of mouthwatering sweets at this Sicilian-style bakery includes ice cream and cake, cookies and cannoli. But what marks it as Sicilian is a boundless batch of that island’s cassata cakes and marzipan crafted into brightly colored, exquisitely detailed fruits. Drool alert! You can skip all that eye candy by sitting and ordering at a table in the tony gallery near the Termini station, but why would you? Bonus points for the best cappuccino by far we had during our two weeks in Italy.

     

    ‘Monumental Cemetery’

    Most of us have found ourselves in a museum gawking at some oddity and thinking (or saying) “Is this art? Really?” That’s certainly the rote response at the catacombs in the Church of the Immaculate Conception (Via Vittorio Veneto 27; www.cappucciniviaveneto.it), where thousands of bones have been fashioned into light fixtures, hourglasses, arches and even flowers in rooms with names such as “The Crypt of Pelvises.” The Catholic Church’s Capucin sect, which has a history of an often-cultish relationship with the dead, crafted these “works of art” with the remains of 4,000 of their flock. Appreciating, or at least understanding, this attitude is enhanced mightily by a fabulous museum above the crypt, leading to a plaque that advises “What you are now, we used to be. What we are now, you shall be.” OK, then.

     






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    • Hidden gems await travelers in Rome

      Saturday November 30, 2013

      To find the heart of this Italian treasure, stray off the typical tourist path.

    • At Villa d’Este near Rome,the gardens – and the view – are lovely.

    • These Lubavitchers stopped in Rome to visit the Jewish Ghetto while returning to Israel after a trip to New York.

    • Sweet treats at Dagnino.

    • The Church of the Immaculate Conception.

    • Postcard for sale in the church’s gift shop.

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    Gift ideas for gardeners

    Worms move abut at Worm Power in Avon. The high-nutrient worm castings product made from cow manure is much richer than compost and works well as an additive to potting soil, among other garden uses.

    Livingston County News File Photo
    Worms move abut at Worm Power in Avon. The high-nutrient worm castings product made from cow manure is much richer than compost and works well as an additive to potting soil, among other garden uses.
    MASTER GARDENER

    Gift ideas for gardeners

    The holiday season is upon us, and many of us are thinking about gifts. I have a few gift ideas for gardeners you might like to consider:

     A subscription to “Gardening Gazette”, a publication of Cornell Cooperative Extension in Livingston County. Cost for 12 monthly issues is only $10 per year, and includes color photos. This gardening information appears in my mailbox when I need it. Call the CCE office at 991-5420 and they will help you order it. All of the published information pertains specifically to Livingston County.

    Worm Power, a high-nutrient worm castings product made from cow manure. The manure is produced at Coyne Farms in Avon, then composted by worms at Tom Herlihy’s business called Worm Power. It is much richer than products sold as compost. It works well as an additive to potting soil, for establishing transplants in the garden, and for top dressing during the season. It is available at J A Farm Market just north of Lakeville, or online from Gardeners Supply (888 833 1412). You can learn more about this product at WormPower.net. A video of the production process is included on this site.

    Compost/topsoil mix from Al Landscaping in Lakeville. The owner, Al Roome, donated some of this for a raised bed I had built for some developmentally disabled adults in Lakeville. The plants went nuts! It is available by the cubic yard. You can have some delivered, or he will sell smaller quantities loaded in your truck or in 5 gallon buckets.

    Hardscape materials, perhaps a palate of stones. We gardeners don’t often buy materials like this for ourselves, but it can be fun and satisfying to create a path or wall.

    Garden Art from The Artful Gardener, 727 Mt. Hope Avenue in Rochester, near Mt. Hope Cemetery. This shop features beautiful art created by local artisans, who are listed on the web page at theartfulgardenerny.com. You should probably involve the gardener in selection of artwork, since taste varies a lot.

    A really long-handled trowel. I bought one from Lee Valley Tools (800 871 8158), they call it a micro spade. It works not only for digging weeds without bending, but is also tall enough (38.5”) to serve effectively as a walking stick. It has a nice bicycle-grip handle. Cost is only $9.50 plus tax and shipping.

    Gardening books: one of my favorites this year is “Everyday Roses” by Paul Zimmerman. There are lots of good roses available on the marketplace now, that don’t need spraying, and don’t need to be mulched heavily for the winter. He covers many of them. One of my talks this spring at Wadsworth Library in Geneseo will be based on this book.

    Of course, the Lee Valley and Gardeners’ Supply catalogs offer a wide array of additional products. I have ordered repeatedly from both of these sources, and have been pleased with the quality and service.

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    Article source: http://thelcn.com/2013/11/30/gift-ideas-for-gardeners/

    Key West commission hears latest waterfront plans

    City Manager Bob Vitas is expected Tuesday to update the Key West City Commission on the status of a large-scale park development planned for the 33-acre Truman Waterfront./ppThe session starts at 6 p.m. at Old City Hall on Greene Street./ppCity staff plans submitted to the Truman Waterfront Advisory Board consider a five-phase development process with construction ending in 2019. The ultimate cost could be $50 million./ppThat number has caused sticker shock for some, resulting in city staff kicking around ideas for savings by reducing the scope of the development while keeping the master plan in place. That plan:/ppLI Phase 1 is construction of basic infrastructure — roads and utilities, boat-ramp improvements and moving the floating 327-foot U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Ingham Maritime Museum National Historic Landmark in 2014./ppLI Phase 1A is construction of the Merili McCoy Public Gardens, a waterfront promenade, interactive water feature, playground and bathrooms in 2014-15./ppLI Phase 2 is construction of a 250-seat amphitheater, associated grounds and a parking lot in 2015-16./ppLI Phase 3 is construction of a multipurpose playfield, second playground, new stables for the Key West Police Department’s Mounted Patrol Unit and more landscaping in 2017./ppLI Phase 4 is renovation of a former U.S. Navy building into a museum, restaurant and park support space in 2017, although that’s flexible./ppPhase 5 is construction of a community center at the site of the Police Athletic League building in 2018-19./ppThe Navy gave the Truman Waterfront, at the end of Southard Street, to the city through what’s called an economic conveyance, signed in 2002. It was part of the Base Realignment and Closure process./ppThough the waterfront schedule calls for a multiuse field in 2017, there’s a rough temporary field on the parcel already. At the Tuesday meeting Commissioner Tony Yaniz will ask his colleagues to redo that field, citing a “severe shortage of field space in the city.”/ppHe wants new sod and an irrigation system. Yaniz wants Vitas to come up with details and get the project done./ppBHoliday freebies/B/ppCommissioners on Tuesday are also set to take their annual action of providing free city bus service and parking at metered spots during the Christmas season./ppBus service will be free in Key West and the Lower Keys on Dec. 23 and 24, but suspended on Dec. 25. Parking at metered spots in Old Town, usually $2 an hour, will be free on Dec. 23, 24 and 25.

    Article source: http://www.keysnet.com/2013/11/30/492858/key-west-commission-hears-latest.html

    Super-Sod is Donating their Doc’s Raised Garden Kits to Families and …

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    100 of these kits to give away at a $200 value/each.

    100 of these kits to give away at a $200 value/each.

    Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) November 29, 2013

    Super-Sod is giving back to the communities that support them. They have 5 farms and 11 outlets in Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina and so are giving away 100 of their Doc’s Raised Garden Kits in those states.

    They’re asking communities to help them give away the 100 Doc’s Raised Garden Kits by nominating community gardens and families in need. Their hope is that these kits will be a part of providing nutritious food to families who might not have access otherwise. Super-Sod is a horticultural enterprise that employs expert gardeners – many who go home to continue gardening. It’s a company of gardeners who know that growing one’s own food is rewarding.

    Each individual may nominate one family or community garden (in GA, NC, or SC – Super-Sod’s home states) to receive a Doc’s Raised Garden Kit. Each Doc’s Kit is valued at $200 each, plus organic seeds will be included for this give-away.

    One Doc’s Raised Garden Kit is composed of:

    • 1 wood bed made of rot-resistant wood that’s fastened with handsome mortise and tenon joints (no tools required for assembly);
    • 17 bags of Soil3 organic humus compost to fill the bed;
    • And for this give-away, 4 packs of organic winter vegetable seeds from Sow True Seeds.

    The company has created an app on their Soil3 Facebook page and Soil3 website where you can submit your nomination. Please visit either of these two sites to nominate:

    Super-Sod is a family-run business that employs experts in turf and horticulture. One of their most popular products has been their Soil3 organic compost which they make partially from composted grass clippings from their sod production. They continue to develop new products, foster gardening and landscaping, and always seek to improve their knowledge, farming practices, technology, and environmental stewardship.

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    Article source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/11/prweb11378093.htm

    Renovated Palm Beach Gardens golf course to reopen Dec. 9

    New greens and fairways will greet golfers Dec. 9 when the public gets its first swings on the city’s golf course that has been closed for renovations since June 1.

    “The city is taking an above-average municipal golf course and making it into a better one,” said John Elmore, a Palm Beach Gardens resident who has been playing the 18-hole Palm Beach Gardens Golf Course for about 20 years. “The whole overall quality of the course will be better.”

    Drainage improvements were a top concern from golfers at public meetings held in April, said Matt Dusenberry, principal for Milwaukee-based Dusenberry Design.

    His company was paid $45,000 for designing the renovations, the first since the par-72 course opened in 1992. Total cost for renovations is about $2.5 million.

    A new drainage system, as well as changing the contours in sections of the course, will let golfers play even in wet summer months, Dusenberry said.

    “Palm Beach Gardens will have a year-round golf course,” he said.

    Permit rates for playing the renovated 6,500-yard golf course on the north side of Northlake Boulevard west of Beeline Highway will stay the same, according to city records.

    Regular day rates for weekday morning play is $41 for city residents and $45 for nonresidents. Frequent player cards are $99 for residents and $129 for nonresidents. Permits for unlimited play for three months from December-April is $540 for city residents and $700 for nonresidents.

    The greens have been stripped down and replaced with TifEagle Bermuda grass. While players will find their putts will roll faster, the new grass will fit the average player, Dusenberry said.

    “The leaf blades are finer. Players will find the green speed is not really (so) high,” Dusenberry said.

    The fairways and tees have been replanted with Celebration Bermuda grass. The dark green grass recovers quickly from divots and is easy to maintain, Dusenberry said.

    “It’s a very flexible grass that can be cut short or can go a little longer to be used as a rough,” he said.

    New putting greens and landscaping are among other renovations. Smoother berms, new bunkers, reshaped greens and a new irrigation system also have been completed. Some sand traps have been moved.

    New landscaping includes native trees and shrubs on the course that is surrounded by woods and wetlands.

    “We wanted to keep the natural backdrop of the golf course,” Dusenberry said.

    The course is scheduled to open to the public Dec. 9. The annual Mayor’s Veterans Golf Classic is planned for Dec. 7. The event is sold out.

    Elmore, saying he is looking forward to playing the new course, said the renovations will allow golfers to play a faster game that will have an improved quality of play.

    “A better golf course will be a real asset to the community,” Elmore said.

    Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/news/local/renovated-palm-beach-gardens-golf-course-to-reopen/nb7qy/

    Gardening Tips: Great Christmas ideas for the gardener in your life

    Posted: Friday, November 29, 2013 11:05 am

    Gardening Tips: Great Christmas ideas for the gardener in your life

    By Matthew Stevens

    The Daily Herald, Roanoke Rapids, NC

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    I hope everyone had an enjoyable Thanksgiving and is now relaxing and recovering. It seems as soon as Thanksgiving passes, everyone turns to the Christmas season. Let me make some great gift suggestions for your favorite gardener. One of the old stand-bys is a good gardening book or two.

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    Friday, November 29, 2013 11:05 am.

    Article source: http://www.rrdailyherald.com/news/features/gardening-tips-great-christmas-ideas-for-the-gardener-in-your/article_06b587aa-5910-11e3-8de1-0019bb2963f4.html

    Teague: A few tips before pruning trees

    Most deciduous trees are pruned and shaped in winter, after leaf fall, which varies according to the tree species. Some spring-blooming trees including dogwoods, redbuds and deciduous magnolias are pruned in spring after they’ve finished blooming. Evergreen trees such as Southern magnolias are also best pruned in winter to avoid sunburned on newly exposed bark. Redwoods and deodoras can be shaped lightly in winter to remove congested interior branches and hazardous limbs, but “thinning” or the removal and stripping of major branches is not recommended. Different tree species require different types of pruning to maintain a strong structure and good health.

    These are a few examples of basic rules of pruning that every tree trimmer, including handy homeowners, should know. Homeowners can and should educate themselves on pruning techniques (at least on what not to do) as well as who should be hired to do pruning.

    Ortho’s “All About Pruning,” available at most garden centers, has excellent illustrations of both proper and bad pruning. If you’re considering having major work done on trees on your property, it’s worth the price of the book ($11.95 the last time I checked) to get the job done right. Poorly pruned trees actually will cost more to maintain over the shortened life of the tree. Restructuring a badly pruned tree takes about seven years of good, expert annual pruning. Trees that are so badly pruned that limbs die and the tree structure is unbalanced are hazardous and are liabilities that cost money to remove. Take the book with you as you walk around your neighborhood. You might be surprised at how many trees have been improperly pruned.

    Certified arborists have received extensive training in tree care, have taken and passed licensing exams and are expected to follow a code of ethics. They’re also the only professional tree pruners, by law, who can work on trees taller than 15 feet or trees near power lines. Their bids often are comparable to other tree pruners and you’ll have the security of knowing that their work is guaranteed. Look for tree care companies that have a certified arborist on staff and get three bids before hiring.

    One of the major reasons to avoid hiring unlicensed and uninsured tree pruners is the potential for major liability costs to the homeowner in case of injury to the pruners while working or if the tree falls and causes injury or property damage. Do not hire any tree pruners who cannot produce a business card listing their contractor’s license number or who do not display the contractor’s license number on their work trucks. Then check their record with the Better Business Bureau and the Contractor’s Licensing Board.

    Elinor Teague is a Fresno County master gardener. Send her plant questions at etgrow@comcast.net or features@fresnobee.com (“plants” in the subject line).

    Article source: http://www.fresnobee.com/2013/11/29/3638946/a-few-tips-before-pruning-trees.html

    Garden Plot: Essential tips for picking, keeping a healthy Christmas tree

    By Mike McGrath

    More Reports


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    Want a really fresh tree? Take a tannenbaum trip

    One good thing about Thanksgiving coming so late in the season this year is that it might slow down the rush to get that live Christmas in the house so dang early. It’s just plain unrealistic to expect a cut tree to hold it needles for the number of weeks some families strive for.

    But no matter how long you hope to keep that tree inside, the best way to increase your odds of having a nearly needle-free floor is to take a trip out to a local Christmas tree farm, pick out a nice one and have them cut it for you. (They call them ‘Cut Your Own’ farms, but I’m probably the only person you’ll see at one still wielding their own saw.)

    The freshness of your tree will be supreme. The trees you see hanging out on local street corners may have been cut several weeks ago and many miles away, while your tree’s clock doesn’t start ticking until your kids scream “Timber!”

    Plus, local tree farms make for a really festive holiday outing. You get to have a great family fight over which one is best – or most needs a home (“Dad-eee! If we don’t take it, it’ll be all alone!”) – and then soothe away any tears with cookies and hot chocolate. You’re also supporting local farmers and helping preserve that land from becoming another crop of townhouses.

    And this year’s listings of area tree farms are new, improved and even easier to use. Here’s the new one for Virginia. Just click on ‘cut your own’ on the “Locator” box on the right. And here’s the one for Maryland, where you search by county.

    Why cut trees are like real estate

    Whether you have a tree cut right in front of you at a local Christmas tree farm or buy your tannenbaum pre-cut from some suspicious stranger in DuPont Circle, the secret to a having a needle-free floor is hydration, hydration, hydration.

    As soon as you get that tree home, use pruners to remove any low branches that would prevent the stump from reaching the bottom of the stand. Don’t remove any bark down low; that’s what sucks the water upstairs to the top. Then use a bow saw — a handy tool every homeowner should have — to cleanly cut two inches off the bottom of the trunk to remove the natural ‘seal’ that will have formed over the initial cut.

    Then stand the tree up in a big bucket or tub full of water for at least a few hours before you bring it into the house. And be ready to refill that tub — a tree that was cut during a dry spell may need several gallons of water to get back to normal.

    Indoor tree care: finessing the fluid

    Want to have a cut tree in the house without your soft blue carpet suddenly changing into a sharp green torture track?

    • Make sure the branches bend easily on the tree you pick. Brittle branches are a sure sign that that tree is already past its prime.
    • Have a bow saw ready to cut two inches off the bottom of the trunk when you get your tree home, and have a big tub full of water to drop that cut stump into. Then watch that water line drop as you create a truly fire-proof tree.
    • If they didn’t ‘shake’ the tree for you already, have someone hold each end (wearing gloves!) and vigorously shake it to remove dead needles, fall leaves and other debris.
    • Place the tree in the coolest possible room indoors and be prepared to add as much as a gallon a day to the reservoir. Use a tape measure to gauge the diameter of the trunk. On average, a tree will need a quart of fresh water a day per inch.
    • Cool devices like “Santa’s Magic Water Spout” allow you to add that essential H2O without crawling underneath your tannenbaum.
    • Warning: Do not let that water reservoir dry out! If it does, the bottom of the tree will seal up again, and dropped needles will be your new floor covering.

    Gifts for gardeners: Gloves, worms, tunnels, Cuba….

    Time to start talking about holiday gifts for gardeners! Here are my top picks for this season:

    • Baseball batting gloves, which make the best garden gloves you’ll ever own.
    • Worm bins, wherein specialized redworms turn your worst kitchen waste into glorious garden gold. Here’s the one I use. I love the convenience of the stackable trays.
    • Garden-sized grow tunnels that allow you to keep picking greens into the New Year, like this one, currently keeping my own personal spinach and lettuce alive.
    • Tickets to the famed Philadelphia Flower in March always make for a great “getaway gift.” And if you give a gift of membership in the presenting organization, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, you automatically get tickets to The Show — and all sorts of cool perks.
    • And for the ultimate garden getaway, you could join me on a botanical trip of Cuba this coming Jan. 14 to the Jan. 22 (where we’re really going for the tropical horticulture and not the 80 to 85 degree daytime temps. Honest!)

    © 2013 WTOP. All Rights Reserved.

    Article source: http://www.wtop.com/902/3514867/6-tips-to-a-mess-free-Christmas-tree

    Mecanoo team chosen to design Garden of the 21st Century at the Royal …

    A team consisting of Mecanoo, Michael van Gessel, DELVA Landscape Architects and Jojko Nawrocki Architekci has been selected to design the new Garden of the 21st Century with integrated exhibition pavilion at the Royal Łazienki Museum in Warsaw, Poland. […]

    Mecanoo will be planning the exhibition pavilion, while Michael van Gessel and DELVA Landscape Architects are in charge of the garden design.
    bustler.net

    Article source: http://archinect.com/news/article/86992052/mecanoo-team-chosen-to-design-garden-of-the-21st-century-at-the-royal-azienki-museum-in-warsaw