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Archives for October 5, 2013

Open plan blends the outdoors with the in – Regina Leader

Is it a house or a cruise ship? Visitors to this contemporary waterfront home on Saanichton’s Turgoose Point may be forgiven if they momentarily imagine they have stepped aboard a ship.

When you walk into the great room, your eye is drawn straight across a highly polished concrete floor through a giant 30-by-eightfoot NanaWall window system and out to sea.

The dramatic L-shaped deck thrusts forward like the prow of a ship, offering breathtaking views and a seafaring feeling as guests look over the rocks and out to the horizon, glimpsing hardly a hint of shoreline below.

Inside the great room, suspended above a life jacket-orange kitchen, is another nautical touch – a promenade deck wrapping around two sides of the room, with a flying bridge over the foyer. Its railing is made of the same materials as those on the pier that hovers like a manta ray over the rocky beach three storeys below, and angles of the top deck repeat those of the pier, offering eye-pleasing symmetry.

The craggy property was blasted to create a building site, patios, a pit for fires and sloped walkways that curve down to the cantilevered pier, which the owners opted for instead of a floating dock. High above the winter storms, it offers year-round access for boating, fishing and diving. Racks along its edge hold the owners’ kayaks, and low-maintenance stainless-steel posts and cables provide nearly invisible railings.

One of the home’s most appealing features is a ground-level terrace for alfresco lounging and dining on more than 600 square feet of covered outdoor space. The nononsense floor is highly polished concrete – like those inside the house – and owners and guests stay warm thanks to a trio of fire pits and recessed infrared soffit units that radiate heat that can’t be blown away by breezes.

Rounding out the lower terrace is a stainless-steel outdoor kitchen with infrared and gas barbecue, fridge, recycling centre, granite countertops and 20 linear feet of cabinet – more than most indoor kitchens have.

Just paces away is a non-traditional wine cellar, which the owners admit to keeping warmer than normal, around 65 degrees F. “That way, the wine ages quicker and I can drink it in five years, not 20,” said Peter, only half jokingly.

Peter and his wife Catherine, who prefer to keep their last name private, are from Calgary, where Peter, a geologist, still works parttime.

Although they met rock climbing, he was born in Prince Rupert and had long wanted to return to the coast, where they now enjoy kayaking.

“When we decided to move here, we’d fly out on weekends and see four or five homes a day,” he said. Then Catherine started exploring websites and spied a home she loved, built by Brant Hoff. They got in touch and began thinking about a custom house.

“One day, Brant called and said: ‘You’ve got to see this fantastic pie-shaped property with water on three sides,’ ” said Peter. With the help of Hoff, Kyle Leggett of Java Designs and Tracey Lamoureux at Creative Spaciz, the house took shape. “We have built three houses before and a commercial property, so we’re not neophytes,” said Peter, who knew what he wanted, and enjoyed the collaboration. “We understand the process and loved Brant’s work,” added Catherine, who was very particular about finishings and fixtures, and also about lights. She chose to recess many of them in the floor, so at night, it’s like living in a spacecraft. All the lights are preprogrammed, and in the children’s rooms, the kids can hit a switch and illuminate a floor-path to the bathroom, as in an airplane.

Article source: http://www.leaderpost.com/homes/Open+plan+blends+outdoors+with/9001511/story.html

Saturday Boredom Busters

SIOUX FALLS, SD –

If you’re looking to redo your kitchen or bathroom, you’ll find plenty of ideas at during this weekend’s Showcase of Remodeled Homes.  Eight homes throughout Sioux Falls are featured in the parade.  You can check them out from noon to 5 pm today and Sunday.  It costs $5 to see all of the homes.  Tickets can be purchased at any of the homes.  Kids 2 and under are free.

Cartoonists from several states are meeting in Sioux Falls for their chapter meeting that includes a celebration of the 40th anniversary of the comic strip Hagar the Horrible.  You can meet cartoonists during a book signing at Zandbroz Variety Bookstore in downtown Sioux Falls from 1-2:30 pm.  The creator of the Watson comic strip Jim Horwitz is the guest speaker at a free program at the downtown public library from 3-5 pm.

The McGovern Crop Walk is a fundraising effort to fight hunger locally and globally.  The walk begins at 10 am at the Sherman Center at Dakota Wesleyan University in Mitchell. 

Cinema Falls presents the Red Carpet Premiere of the science fiction drama Dust of War.  The movie plays at 7 pm at the West Mall 7 Theatres at the Western Mall in Sioux Falls.  You can meet the director during an after party at the Minnehaha Country Club.

The Festival of Bands features more than 40 bands from four states marching and competition in Sioux Falls.  The morning parade starts at 8:30 am on Main Avenue.  Preliminary field events begin at 10:30 am at Howard Wood Field.  The finals will be at 6 pm.  Wristband sales for admission to the field competition benefit all four Sioux Falls high school bands.

The Harlem Ambassadors take on the South Dakota Highway Patrol in a fundraising basketball game.  Tipoff is at 7 pm at the University of Sioux Falls.  All proceeds from ticket sales benefit the South Dakota Highway Patrol Association.

All aboard the Pumpkin Train at Prairie Village, west of Madison, SD.  Kids can ride the train to the pumpkin patch and pick their own pumpkin from 11 am to 4 pm.  The cost is $5, parents ride for free.  Money raised will go toward restoring Prairie Village’s chapel rail car.

The Great Pumpkin Weigh-Off is part of a weekend of fun at Country Apple Orchard’s Harvest Festival.  Today’s hours are 10 am to 5 pm.  Sunday’s hours are noon to five.  The festival also includes pumpkin picking, pony rides, a kids petting farm, and homemade orchard chili.  Country Apple Orchard is located 4 and a half miles south of Sioux Falls on Minnesota Avenue.

Oakridge Nursery Landscaping is hosting a Pumpkin Pickin’ Party from 9 am to 5 pm.  Enjoy apple cider and kettle corn while you color your freshly-picked pumpkin. The partying takes place at 2217 S. Splitrock Boulevard in Brandon.

 

Article source: http://www.keloland.com/newsdetail.cfm/saturday-boredom-busters/?id=154117

Fix Up Your Home In A Weekend With These 6 DIY Ideas (PHOTOS)

Now that summer is over, there’s officially no excuse to ignore those fix-it projects — and if the packed aisles at home improvement stores prove anything, everyone feels the same way. But if your list is so long that you don’t really know where to start, here are a few DIY ideas to get you going. What will you be working on this weekend?

Paint The Front Door


If yours has seen better days, right now is the perfect time to give your front door a new lease on life. It’s a straight-forward job, but if you need guidance on color choice or process, check out This Old House.

Aerate The Front Lawn


While we’re on the topic of projects that could impact curb appeal, your lawn needs a little maintenance before the first frost arrives. First on the list? Aerating. This will loosen up the soil, so nutrients and oxygen can better reach the roots. Experts recommend tackling this job 1-2 days after you water. So, plan on watering on Saturday and aerating on Sunday. For a comprehensive overview on aerating, visit DIY Network.

Power Wash Your Walkways


It’s strangely satisfying to see months of dirt disappear with (highly pressurized) water. Do this now, before temps dip too low in the evenings. HGTV has a great primer on power washing.

Install A Floodlight


An evening commute often makes you notice how it’s getting so much darker, so much earlier. For a safer entrance into your driveway, better lighting is a must. Check out the tutorial on installing a floodlight over at This Old House.

Plant Spring Bulbs Now


A little work now pays off big next March/April. Better Homes Gardens has the simplified instructions for planting spring bulbs.

Replace Any Broken Screens


No one knows how the holes happen, but there they are, right in your window screen. Bob Vila will show you how to replace a damaged or broken window screen — even if you’re a novice DIYer.

Looking for more DIY inspiration? Check out these curb appeal projects.

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  • Install Metal House Numbers

    Improve your home’s curb appeal with new house numbers. Metal numbers can match any style, from vintage to modern, and adds a refined look. All you have to do is drill into the masonry with a specialized bit to anchor the numbers.

  • Re-Gravel The Driveway

    Because gravel driveways and paths can get “potholes” too. The good news is that all you’ll need are a few bags of gravel, a 2×4 (or something to “tamp” the gravel into place) and, if on a driveway, a car. Simply fill, tamp and then run over the filled-in spot. For a more detailed how-to, visit a href=”http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/home/driveway-cracks5.htm” target=”_blank”TLC/a.

  • Freshen Up Your Fence

    If your backyard fence has never been stained, or the color has faded from the sun, adding a fresh coat is sure to brighten it up and protect the wood. First choose your stain and make sure your fence is clean and dry. Using a roller with a long attachment, coat about 3 feet of fence at a time. It is best to roll in the same direction as the wood grain. Then, move to the next section. Staining the fence in small sections will help make sure you cover each area completely. Allow to dry and apply a second coat if needed.

  • Turn A Rug Into A Welcome Mat

    Bring new life to your old rug with a little spray paint. We love how blogger Kinsey Mhire of a href=”http://sincerelykinsey.blogspot.com.es/2012/02/wont-you-stay-awhile-rug-diy.html” target=”_blank”Sincerely Kinsey/a used masking tape to create a chevron pattern. She also used adhesive lettering, which is available at your local craft store, to personalize her mat with a message. For the full tutorial, visit a href=”http://sincerelykinsey.blogspot.com.es/2012/02/wont-you-stay-awhile-rug-diy.html” target=”_blank”Sincerely Kinsey/a.

  • Install Window Awnings

    Installing window awnings is a good way to give your home some curb appeal if it’s looking a little tired and they’ll also keep the summer heat from beatingbeaming in. First, using a power drill and the supplies provided in a a href=”http://www.walmart.com/search/search-ng.do?walst=truesearch_query=Window+Awning+Kits” target=”_blank”window awning kit/a, center and mount your brackets above the window. Then slide the bead of the curtain in the mounting bar, allowing the curtain to hang down. Center the curtain on the mounting bar and use pliers to squeeze the ends, locking the awning into place. Next, attach the support beams to the bottom piece of the awning and twist to lock them into place. Afterward, attach the support arms and secure them into the wall brackets using screws.

    For a full tutorial, visit a href=”http://www.nuimageawnings.com/Instructions/assets/product_pdf/NI-55-5700-Instr.pdf” target=”_blank”Nuimage Awnings/a.

  • Build A Sitting Wall

    Take advantage of the beautiful weather with an outdoor DIY project. A sitting wall is a stylish addition to any backyard and a great way to add some flair to your landscaping. You’ll need to do some measuring and digging before you get started. Once the area is dug out, lay the bricks. Use construction adhesive to make sure the wall is secure.

    Visit a href=”http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/how-to-build-a-stone-sitting-wall/index.html” target=”_blank”DIY Network/a for an in-depth tutorial.

  • Paint Your Mailbox

    Add serious curb appeal by fixing up your mailbox. If it’s looking a little weather-worn or isn’t standing straight, a few quick and easy fixes will ensure you’re giving off a positive first impression to passers-by. Replace the stand or repaint the box with a fresh, vivid coat. If it’s damaged beyond repair, buy a new mailbox and start fresh. Then, add accents and decorations to personalize.

    Learn how to replace your mailbox and create a nautical design and more at a href=”http://gmctradesecrets.aol.com/decor/how-to-dress-up-your-mailbox/” target=”_blank”GMC Trade Secrets/a.

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/05/weekend-diy-ideas_n_4045847.html

VIDEO: ‘Secret’ gardens go back on public show

HISTORIC gardens hidden in a popular tourist attraction have been opened to the public after being boarded up for more than 100 years.

Visitors to Biddulph Grange Gardens will now have access to the Victorian garden, created by James Bateman in the mid 19th century.

The lush plot cost around £5,000 to restore and gardeners and volunteers helped replant the area over a period of two years.

Garden Manager, Paul Walton, said the new garden had been largely unused since Robert Heath owned Biddulph Grange in the late 1800s.


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The National Trust took over the estate in 1988, but kept the area closed off to visitors.

Paul said: “Except to make sure it is safe and to check on a few of the trees in that area, no-one has really entered the garden for a very long time.

“It was very overgrown and the gravel paths were covered up.

“In Robert Heath’s time he would used the area to entertain guests. He had a team of around 60 gardens and what they achieved at Biddulph Grange in terms of building and landscaping is fabulous.”

The new garden features a carefully crafted Victorian style bridge over a pond and even has its own micro-climate suited to plants that grow in damp weather, like ferns.

Paul explained the layout of 17 acre Biddulph Grange allowed visitors to explore and ‘stumble’ upon hidden areas and themed gardens.

It features collections of rhododendrons, summer bedding displays, a dahlia walk in late summer and the oldest surviving golden larch in Britain, brought from China in the 1850s.

Paul said: “There aren’t many gardens where you can go on a global journey from Italy to the pyramids of Egypt, through China and a Himalayan glen.

“And this garden complements the flow. You could easily miss it and when you’re in it you can’t see any of the other gardens.

“One of the really interesting things about it is that because of its position it feels much cooler and more damp than the Chinese garden which is really quite hot.

“The gardeners who worked on this estate were years ahead of their time when they designed these gardens.”

The garden has now been open for two weeks and is attracting back visitors who want to see the previously unexplored area.

Paul added: “We’ve had so many wonderful comments about the garden.

“It’s been a long process and our volunteers and staff have put in a huge amount of work but I think the result is well worth the effort.”

Margaret Chell, from Knypersley, visits the garden regularly with her grandchildren.

The 74-year-old said: “It’s a stunning addition to the gardens. I came along for the first time last week.

“It was thrilling to step into the garden for the first time because I come here so often and I’d barely noticed that it was there before.

“They’ve done a marvellous job of restoring it, it really feels like it could be a Victorian garden.”

Pip Barrett, aged 69, also from Knypersley, is also a huge admirer of the gardens, and is fascinated by their historical background.

He said: “When you stop and think that people created these gardens hundreds of years ago it’s astounding.

“I’m sure I shall return in the spring to see the new flowers in bloom.”

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Article source: http://www.thisisstaffordshire.co.uk/VIDEO-Secret-gardens-public/story-19891009-detail/story.html

More ‘Florida-Friendly Landscaping’ principles for residents

Plant sale is Oct. 12

Plant sale is Oct. 12

Nursery plants are ready to find a home at the “Fall Master Gardener Plant Sale” that will be held Oct. 12.




Posted: Saturday, October 5, 2013 9:00 am


More ‘Florida-Friendly Landscaping’ principles for residents


0 comments

W e recently discussed five of the nine “Florida Friendly Landscaping” principles. The remaining four principles are easy to implement and have the ability to positively impact the health of our natural community. Attracting wildlife, recycling, reducing stormwater runoff, and protecting the waterfront are all principles that every homeowner can easily implement in their yard.


Your home landscape can be a needed refuge for wildlife in urban and suburban areas. Attracting wildlife can also be rewarding for the home gardener. Daily visits by birds and butterflies can create a sense of relaxation for the viewer.

To attract wildlife, use native plants, bird feeders, and bird baths to provide food and water. Install birdhouses and leave dead tree stumps, as shelter for cavity nesting birds. Provide a variety of height and texture when choosing plants for your yard and you will be rewarded by diverse birds and animals.

Practice recycling in your home landscape by leaving yard wastes onsite. For example, take advantage of free mulch by raking oak leaves and pine needles into planting beds. The oak leaves and pine needles break down and add organic matter and acidity to the soil.

A small compost pile is also easy to add. Begin a compost pile by adding green materials, such as grass clippings, green leaves, or vegetable scraps, and brown materials such as dried leaves and small twigs. Composting turns yard wastes and debris and into a rich, beautiful soil amendment that can be added to new and existing plantings.

Another way to recycle in your yard is to add a rain barrel to the end of a downspout. You can easily harvest the rainwater and use it to water pots and annual and perennial beds.

Stormwater runoff can occur when oil, pesticides, fertilizers and debris are carried by rainfall into our bodies of water. Reducing stormwater runoff goes hand-in-hand with recycling yard wastes onsite. Leave grass clipplings on your lawn and never wash or blow them down a storm drain.

If you spill fertilizer on your sidewalks or driveways, sweep it up and apply it back to your lawn. Do not apply fertilizers before excessive rainfall is predicted. Fertilizer can leach into the soil and contribute to pollution when not applied correctly.

You can further protect the waterfront by leaving a three- to 10-foot buffer zone around lakes, retention ponds or any type of surface water. Within this buffer zone fertilizers and pesticides should not be applied. Try to leave as much native vegetation around water bodies as possible as plants provide a good filter of pollutants.

We live in a beautiful area of Central Florida riddled with water. Let’s do our part to protect this valuable natural resource. For information on “Florida Friendly Landscaping” go to the University of Florida’s website at http://fyn.ifas.ufl.edu/.

The UF/IFAS Lake County master gardeners will be hosting their “Fall Plant Sale” at 9:00 a.m. on Oct. 12. This sale provides Florida friendly and unusual plants at great prices. Proceeds from the sale benefit Discovery Gardens and volunteer education.

Brooke Moffis is the residential horticulture agent of the UF/IFAS Lake County Extension office. Email burnb48@ufl.edu.

on

Saturday, October 5, 2013 9:00 am.

Article source: http://www.dailycommercial.com/life/article_6a0d6117-cfbd-5b53-93a2-52eb65014c1f.html

Autumn edibles: Tips for fall gardening and second plantings

Autumn edibles: Tips for fall gardening and second plantings

Autumn edibles: Tips for fall gardening and second plantings




Posted: Tuesday, October 1, 2013 12:00 am


Autumn edibles: Tips for fall gardening and second plantings

People choose to garden for many reasons: Food is fresher and tastes better. It’s a healthy hobby that exercises the body. It saves money. Numerous reports show an increasing number of homeowners are growing their own fruits, vegetables and herbs.


As temperatures cool,-you may think gardening season is over. The good news is with a few strategic tips, you can keep your green thumb going and enjoy a plethora of autumn edibles for months to come. –

Step 1: Select second plantings

Second plantings are the plants you use for the latter part of the gardening season. Late summer is typically the best time to plant these varieties. Call your local extension offices or access information online to find regionalized planting schedules and recommended plant varieties.

The length of the fall season and when the first frost will likely hit are important considerations when selecting second plantings. Keep in mind that fast-maturing vegetables are ideal for fall gardening and they should be planted early enough to reach maturity before the first frost arrives.

Popular second plantings that yield a delicious late fall/early winter harvest include broccoli, lettuce, turnips, collards, carrots, peas, radish, spinach, leeks and beets. Some people even claim root vegetables and cole crops like kale and turnips taste better after the first frost.

Step 2: Prepare your garden space

If you plan to use your current garden space for second plantings, remove the early-season plants that are done producing. Add those plants to your current compost bin or create a new compost pile with easy-to-use, stylish options from Outdoor Essentials. Wood-slate bins blend well with the outdoor aesthetic and the design allows oxygen to circulate and facilitate the composting process.

Next, prepare your garden space. Elevated garden beds are growing in popularity because they look great anywhere in your yard or on your patio, and are easy to move if necessary. Raised garden beds from Outdoor Essentials elevate the plants so gardeners don’t have to bend over and risk injury. They are ideal for fall because gardeners can regulate the temperature of raised beds with ease. On hot days, move or add a shade netting to protect plants from the heat; when frost is a threat, cover the entire bed for protection.

While you’re getting your hands dirty, fall is the perfect time to plant spring flowering bulbs. A little outdoor work now and you’ll be rewarded with beautiful flowers when spring arrives next year.

Step 3: Enjoy the harvest

Tend your garden daily for the best results – it may just need a quick check for pests and proper soil moisture. Typical benefits of late-season gardening include fewer bothersome bugs and the soil has better water retention.

As plants grow, pick the fruits and vegetables and enjoy Mother Nature’s bounty. If your plants become crowded, pluck a few out to help remaining plants grow roots and increase the harvest yield. You may be surprised just how many cool months your plants provide you with fresh, delicious produce.

Fall is a great opportunity to keep gardening momentum alive. So get started and decide what second plantings are best for your space. In as little as 30 days you could be eating the freshest, most flavorful vegetables you’ve ever had, all while under the gorgeous autumn sun.

on

Tuesday, October 1, 2013 12:00 am.

Article source: http://www.courierjournal.net/community/article_d627b610-2c5c-11e3-ac2b-0019bb2963f4.html

Gardening Tips: The ins and outs of growing pumpkins


Posted: Friday, October 4, 2013 11:19 am


Gardening Tips: The ins and outs of growing pumpkins

By Matthew Stevens

The Daily Herald, Roanoke Rapids, NC

|
0 comments

I’d like to start with a quick reminder Harvest Day is this weekend at the 4-H Rural Life Center in Halifax. Although Harvest Day is mainly an event to celebrate our agricultural history, it is also a day of fun and entertainment. One of the new activities this year will be a dunking booth, and if you’re a faithful reader of this column, you might be interested to hear that I will be sitting in the dunking booth from 12:30 to 1 p.m. tomorrow.

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Friday, October 4, 2013 11:19 am.

Article source: http://www.rrdailyherald.com/opinion/columns/gardening-tips-the-ins-and-outs-of-growing-pumpkins/article_70c99ad4-2d08-11e3-a020-001a4bcf887a.html

Fall gardening tips: Get planting to eat all year in BC

The autumn rain is a sign for many green thumbs that it’s time to prepare their garden soil for the spring.

For other gardeners, however, the change in season means it’s time to make the switch to those winter vegetables that thrive in cold weather.

Bardia Khaledi designs gardens and helped build the Steveston Educational Garden. He says you can have a profusion of vegetables throughout the winter.

Khaledi says the great thing about fall gardening is you don’t have to keep watering your plants. If you can stand a little rain, you can enjoy garden-to-plate meals all year round. 

Here’s his winter gardening advice:  

  • Make sure your garden plot has good drainage, particularly if your beds are in the ground and not raised.
  • If you are putting your garden to bed, you can grow a cover crop to put nitrogen back in the soil, such as rye or clover or legumes (different kinds of peas). 
  • You can also collect seeds for next year, including nasturtiums, soy beans, peas, and broad beans, as well as tomatoes. 

Here are five vegetables that do well when the weather gets chilly:

  • Garlic (should be planted in October) 
  • Brassicas — broccoli, turnips, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts
  • Leafy greens — kale, Swiss chard
  • Fava beans

Article source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/fall-gardening-tips-get-planting-to-eat-all-year-in-b-c-1.1913161

Grass seed must to be wet to grow

How much watering do I need to do after I put down grass seed? Once a day? Twice? Will dew keep it wet?

Once grass seed absorbs water, it must stay wet until it germinates. If wet seed dries up, it is killed. So the aim of your watering is to keep the seed wet, and how much watering that requires depends several factors. Higher temperatures, low humidity, lack of cloud cover, breeziness and drought will all hasten evaporation and require you to water more frequently. A thin layer of an organic material, such as Leafgro or compost, will hold in some moisture. And a sparse covering of straw gives shade and wind protection. Dew is tricky, because we can have dew even when the soil is bone dry. You’ll have to inspect your grass seed once or twice daily at least and water accordingly.

If a dogwood tree is leaning over and has most of its growth on one side, would pruning that side back help balance the growth? It might be leaning to get light.

If it is leaning to reach more sunlight, pruning will not change its growth habit. You could prune back any trees shading it however. On the other hand, if it is unbalanced because it was pushed or fell over or lost branches on one side to storm damage, pruning may stimulate some growth on the less dense side.

University of Maryland Extension’s Home and Garden Information Center offers free gardening and pest information. Call 800-342-2507 or send a question to the website at extension.umd.edu/hgic.

Plant of the Week

Drift Rose ‘Pink Drift’

Rose x ‘Meijocos’ (Pink Drift)

Roses once had a reputation as so fussy, needy, and high maintenance that gardeners left them out of their landscapes. New roses have come a long way — and not just “Knock-Out” shrub roses. ‘Drift’ and ‘Carpet’ roses also flower repeatedly throughout the growing season with improved disease resistance and winter hardiness, plus these low varieties can be ground covers.

Pink Drift grows about 18 inches high and spreads 3 feet wide. Its bright cherry-pink single flowers have white centers and bright yellow anthers. Though each flower is small, they compensate with a profusion of clusters. They flower best in full sun, blooming repeatedly (with short rests to set new buds) until hard frost. Though not necessary, removal of spent blooms makes for a tidier look and speeds the rebudding process. Once established, they are generally carefree, except for pruning them back to about 6 inches in early spring. — Christine McComas

Article source: http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/home-garden/bs-hm-garden-qa-1006-20131002,0,4055026.story

Fall gardening tips: What to plant to eat all year in BC

The autumn rain is a sign for many green thumbs that it’s time to prepare their garden soil for the spring.

For other gardeners, however, the change in season means it’s time to make the switch to those winter vegetables that thrive in cold weather.

Bardia Khaledi designs gardens and helped build the Steveston Educational Garden. He says you can have a profusion of vegetables throughout the winter.

Khaledi says the great thing about fall gardening is you don’t have to keep watering your plants. If you can stand a little rain, you can enjoy garden-to-plate meals all year round. 

Here’s his winter gardening advice:  

  • Make sure your garden plot has good drainage, particularly if your beds are in the ground and not raised.
  • If you are putting your garden to bed, you can grow a cover crop to put nitrogen back in the soil, such as rye or clover or legumes (different kinds of peas). 
  • You can also collect seeds for next year, including nasturtiums, soy beans, peas, and broad beans, as well as tomatoes. 

Here are five vegetables that do well when the weather gets chilly:

  • Garlic (should be planted in October) 
  • Brassicas — broccoli, turnips, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts
  • Leafy greens — kale, Swiss chard
  • Fava beans

Article source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/fall-gardening-tips-what-to-plant-to-eat-all-year-in-bc-1.1913161