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Archives for August 9, 2013

Holistic approaches to chronic disease

Author describes how the holistic philosophy allowed her to continue healing beyond traditional medicine

by Heidi Emmerling Muñoz, RDH, PhD, FAADH

I have nonalcoholic chronic liver disease. The condition does not cause me any symptoms; however the doctors wanted to treat it. The GI specialist contacted a bile duct while performing a biopsy, which caused excruciating pain. Next, they recommended chemotherapy. I went a year injecting myself three times a week with interferon, which caused me to be nauseated, fatigued, achy, and anemic. It was hard to focus and I suffered mental fogging, depression, and anxiety. I exhausted my sick days because working was nearly impossible. Although the treatment did not work, going through this ordeal allowed me to learn about the benefits of taking a holistic approach to health.

I believe toxic physical environments, long-term negative relationships, poor choices regarding nutrition, and neglecting self-care all contributed to my condition. I now know the way to turn it around is to address the mind-body-spirit aspects of holistic health.

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Other articles by Heidi Emmerling Munoz

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This was counterintuitive for me and, I believe, for many people, especially women and dental hygienists, who are programmed to put ourselves last. Self-care is often seen as a selfish luxury. “Just suck it up.” The painful and expensive lesson I learned is that putting myself last is simply not worth it. What makes matters even sadder is we are not helping those we purport to love because we don’t have our full selves to give when we are so run-down.

My story is not unique. There are many out there who live with chronic conditions that conventional medicine does not address. According to the American Holistic Health Association (AHHA), the focuses of holistic health include an approach to lifestyle that prevents or mitigates chronic conditions; a focus on the entire person rather than the illness or a specific body part; the incorporation of mind, body, and spirit; and having people accept responsibility for their own level of health.

Some people call holistic healing “new age” but there is really nothing new about it. Socrates suggested that we should avoid focusing on just one sick part of the body saying, “for the part can never be well unless the whole is well.” However, during the 20th century, holistic health fell out of favor as medicine began focusing on germs and pills to rid the body of the germs. The result is that we lost sight of health. People were duped into thinking that synthetic pills could compensate for unhealthy lifestyle choices. We are seeing the result with harsh treatments for diseases; oftentimes, such as in my case, treatments are worse than the disease, not to mention ineffective.

According to Suzan Walter, MBA, cofounder and president of AHHA, “When an individual is anxious about a history exam or job interview, his or her nervousness may result in a physical reaction — such as a headache or a stomach ache. When people suppress anger at a parent or boss over a long period of time, they often develop a serious illness such as migraines, emphysema, or even arthritis.” And who among us hasn’t had chronic stress in our lives? This stress often begins in childhood.

Based on a comprehensive study of 17,000 Kaiser members, one out of every five members has had three or more adverse childhood experiences (ACE). See “What Is My ACE Score?” The more ACE experiences one has, the more likely psychological and medical problems will increase. In the study, researchers found that one of six people had an ACE score of four or more. One of 10 people had an ACE score of five or more. Fifty percent of women were more likely to have an ACE score of five or more. My ACE score is six. The links to ACE and medical conditions are alarming. Kaiser reports that there is a strong relationship between ACE and heart disease, liver disease, COPD, and consequently health-related quality of life.

Kaiser physicians explain that ACE disrupts the normal development of the nervous system. When children’s brains are still developing, they are vulnerable to stressful life events. ACE promotes hypervigilance and a tendency to have chronic worry about danger. Chronic high anxiety levels leave the body exposed to stress hormones that keep us ready for fight or flight with rapid heart rate, increased blood flow, and narrow focus on danger clues. Therefore, since so many people have had ACE incidents, not to mention experiences with everyday chronic stress, as well as physical challenges from our environment and food, it is really not surprising that many people suffer from chronic conditions that conventional medicine alone cannot undo.

Robert Ivker, DO, outlines the differences between holistic medicine and conventional medicine, stating that holistic healing addresses the entire person: body, mind, and spirit. See Table 1 for the differences between holistic and conventional medicine, according to Ivker. What we notice is that the primary and secondary treatment options are opposite for the two approaches, and that conventional approaches work on acute and life-threatening illness while holistic ones work best for chronic conditions. We need both approaches. Most of us were taught the conventional method and have not had formal training on holistic approaches.

The American Holistic Medical Association views illness as a manifestation of a dysfunction of a whole person, not an isolated event. Holistic physicians encourage patients to “evoke the healing power of love, hope, humor, and enthusiasm and to release the toxic consequences of hostility, shame, greed, depression, and prolonged fear, anger, and grief.” They continue: “Optimal health is the conscious pursuit of the highest qualities of the physical, environmental, mental, emotional, spiritual, and social aspects of the human experience.”

Daniel Benor, MD, a diplomate on the American Board of Holistic Integrative Medicine, writes of themes of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM). He claims that CAM therapies are potent interventions for allergies, arthritis, asthma, heart disease, backaches, headaches, IBS, menopausal problems, UTIs, PTSD, cerebral palsy, strokes, cancers, AIDS, chronic fatigue, and more. Benor claims that, contrary to the linear either/or model of Western medicine, CAM “awakens and nurtures intuitive and spiritual awareness” and CAM includes “contributions of emotions, minds, relationships (people and our environment), and spirit.” CAM introduces the concept of body-mind and person-spirit connections. Furthermore, Benor asserts that philosophies of holistic integrative care enrich the lives of health caregivers through addressing diet, meditation, and yoga. This is great news for dental hygienists and behooves us to investigate holistic health further.

Inspired by Andrew Weil, Deepak Chopra, Louise Hay, and other healers, I incorporate their suggestions for my medical recovery. These are what worked (and continue to work) for me:

Mind

  1. Educate yourself as much as possible, particularly as it relates to health. Keep an open mind to new ideas. Talk to others about healing.
  2. Learn something new, whether it is dance, fly fishing, crocheting, gardening, or cooking — anything you believe would support your overall health. I always try to have a book in progress.
  3. Learn and practice different coping mechanisms to detox your life and your mind of negativity. This might require outside expertise from a counselor and most certainly support from your inner circle. Sometimes situations work themselves out that seem devastating at the time but, in reality, are blessings in disguise (broken relationships, job changes, etc.). Realize that things really do happen for the best.
  4. Affirm yourself. Your mind and body believe what they hear. I really used to think this was hokey but it has made a huge difference in my life. The affirmations can be audio recordings, physical notes, and self-talk. Louise Hay has some great affirmation tools. It goes without saying that one should shun negative self-talk and overly critical colleagues and family members. Negativity is counterproductive.
  5. Practice intentional breathing and meditation to clear and calm the mind. Turn off the TV, especially the news. Let go of things you cannot change.

Body

  1. Rest. Research shows we really do need seven to eight hours of sleep a night, regardless of the fact we all think we are superheroes. I used to fool myself into thinking I was superhuman and did not need as much sleep as mere mortals. Getting adequate sleep allows the body to rejuvenate, and sleep helps with weight management as well. During my medical recovery, I discovered I had neurologic sleep apnea (the nonobstructive type where my brain forgets to tell me to breathe when I am asleep). If I had it and did not know it, I suspect others might unknowingly have it as well. If you wake up fatigued, consider being evaluated for sleep apnea. I now wear a very (un)attractive bi-PAP machine but my brain and my heart are much happier.
  2. Eat mindfully and maintain ideal body weight. This isn’t about looking hot; it’s about living life fully and preventing disease. I am working on weight management and am very mindful of what I eat. I have resigned myself that this is something I will need to be aware of my entire life. There will never be a point where I can ignore it. Weight Watchers has a very common-sense, tried-and-true program of which I am a member. In addition to following the program, I avoid alcohol, most animal proteins, artificial flavorings and preservatives, processed foods, refined sugar, and conventionally grown produce. I drink plenty of water and take recommended vitamins and supplements (B, C, E, calcium, magnesium, milk thistle). The other benefit of clean eating is it helps clear the mind as well as decrease anxiety and depression. The other part of eating well is eating regularly. Having breakfast is key, as is eating lunch. And try not to eat dinner too late. Again, I used to think it was selfish to carve out a lunch when there were patients or students who needed me, or meetings to attend. Eat healthy food, distraction free, and take your time to eat consciously. I try to eat my breakfast and lunch outside wherever possible. When I must eat at my desk, I close the door, turn on a desk lamp (not the overhead florescent lamp) and flip on some soothing music from my iPhone. I always have real dishes and silverware at work, as well as a cloth placemat and napkin. Self-care is number one.
  3. Move. It is really easy to get caught up in telling ourselves we have no time to exercise. After all, there are people we need to take care of (except ourselves, of course). My new doggie has helped me in this area. She needs her walk every day and it forces me to move. It gets me outside in the fresh air and I am out walking for an hour a day. The movement triggers the endorphins, the sunshine helps with depression, I am getting stretching and aerobic activity, and I am enjoying my doggie. My husband joins me so it makes a very pleasant time for us to visit as well. We get to see and interact with our neighbors and get good landscaping ideas. Indoors, I have a stepper in the living room where I can watch TV and move, and I have 5-pound weights next to my chair in the living room. I can grab them when I am watching some mindless entertainment. At work, when I am at my desk for hours at a time, I force myself to get up and move at least five minutes every hour.
  4. Sweat or detox. Whenever I can, I use a sauna. When I walk my doggie, I rarely work up a sweat and sweating helps purge our bodies of toxins. Since I want a healthy liver, I try to regularly detox and a sauna allows me to do this.
  5. Wear sunscreen and take care of your skin. When I was younger, I felt invincible but as I age I see more sun spots. I never leave the house without applying moisturizer with SPF to my face and body. I also use lip balm with SPF in it.
  6. Keep up with well-checks including annual physical, mammograms, blood work, your own dental prophylaxis (we are always the last ones), and so forth. Don’t forget about your hair and nails. It is OK to splurge on the occasional massage and mani-pedi. This all ties in to self-care and being responsible for ourselves. If you feel paying for an outside mani-pedi is too much, you can do very affordable in-home spa indulgences. In fact, this is why I became a BeautiControl consultant, so I can get wholesale spa products. I observed when others started seeing me taking better care of myself, they actually started respecting my time more and treating me better too. After all, you model what you expect others to mirror in regard to how you want and deserve to be treated.

Spirit

  1. Connect to a spiritual source, whether it is a deity or Mother Earth. I am not fortunate enough to have a window in my office so I like to bring the outside in. At work I always have fresh-cut flowers, either from my garden or from the floral department, in a beautiful vase in my office.
  2. Do things you love. Go to concerts or the theater. Watch funny movies. Bring music into your life. Dance, paint, or draw. You may discover a hidden talent and, the best part is, you will have fun doing it.
  3. Take pride in your appearance. Try a different shade of lipstick; curl (or straighten) your hair. My favorite advice that I take to heart is to get a new pair of shoes. I used to slink around with my hair stuck up in a butterfly clip, with no makeup, and in oversized sweats and flip flops because it was comfortable, and I simply didn’t have the time or energy to make the effort. This was especially easy to do when I had to wear scrubs for my job. What did it matter? That attitude did nothing for my mood or self-esteem. When I look better, I just feel better. I am worth the effort it takes and so are you.
  4. Reconnect with important people from your past. This can be extremely difficult yet extremely healing. Obviously, stay away from the toxic people; some folks you need to love from a distance. If possible, forgive them, not for their sake but for your own. Remember, it is your health at stake, not theirs. Instead of “forgive and forget” you might need to “forgive and remember” to avoid repeating the same mistake. If you need to make amends, do so as long as you are not harming yourself or others in making those amends.
  5. Volunteer. Give of yourself because it nourishes your spirit and makes the world a little shinier because you are in it. You may choose to volunteer for your professional association, for a battered women’s shelter, the Humane Society, or something totally different. It opens up your world, increases your social network, and allows you to use and give of your strengths.
  6. Keep a gratitude journal. Start your day listing several things you are grateful for. It is impossible to feel angry or depressed when you feel grateful.

    On my journey toward optimal health, the holistic philosophy has allowed me to thrive where traditional medicine left off. I encourage us as a healing profession to embrace the possibilities in the holistic philosophy and to find ways to practice this in our own lives to be a living, breathing resource for our patients. RDH

    Heidi Emmerling Muñoz, RDH, PhD, FAADH, is a professor of English at Cosumnes River College and former interim director of dental hygiene at Sacramento City College. She is owner of Writing Cures (www.writingcures.com), a writing and editing service. Dr. Muñoz is coauthor of The Purple Guide: Paper Persona and creator of the Career Development Center for Friends of Hu-Friedy. She is a frequent contributor to RDH Magazine and has written articles and columns for a variety of publications. Dr. Muñoz can be reached at munozh@crc.losrios.edu.


    Self quiz

    Prior to your 18th birthday:

    1. Did a parent or other adult in the household often or very often swear at you, insult you, put you down, or humiliate you, or act in a way that made you feel afraid that you might be physically hurt

    2. Did a parent or other adult in the household often or very often push, grab, slap, or throw something at you, or ever hit you so hard that you had marks or were injured

    3. Did an adult or person at least five years older than you ever touch or fondle you or have you touch or fondle their body in a sexual way, or attempt or actually have oral, anal, or vaginal intercourse with you

    4. Did you often or very often feel that no one in your family loved you or thought you were important or special, or your family didn’t look out for one another, feel close to one another, or support one another

    5. Did you often or very often feel that you didn’t have enough to eat, had to wear dirty clothes, and had no one to protect you, or your parents were too drunk or high to take care of you or take you to the doctor if you needed it

    6. Was a biological parent ever lost to you through divorce, abandonment, or other reason

    7. Was your mother or stepmother often or very often pushed, grabbed, slapped, or had something thrown at her, or sometimes, often, or very often kicked, bitten, hit with a fist, or hit with something hard, or ever repeatedly hit over at least a few minutes or threatened with a gun or knife

    8. Did you live with anyone who was a problem drinker or alcoholic or who used street drugs

    9. Was a household member depressed or mentally ill, or did a household member attempt suicide

    10. Did a household member go to prison

    Score one for each YES answer and that is the ACE score

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    More RDH Articles
    Past RDH Issues

Article source: http://www.rdhmag.com/articles/print/volume-33/issue-8/features/holistic-approached-to-chronic-disease.html

Fishermen Catch 920-Pound Fish

Friday, Aug. 9, 2013 | 7:18 a.m.

Article source: http://www.wsoctv.com/videos/entertainment/fishermen-catch-920-pound-fish/v8YB3/

Rodent Guys Announces They Now Servicing Sun Valley, CA for Gopher Control …

Gopher extermination service now available through Rodent Guys for Sun Valley, Ca properties owners.

Sun Valley, CA (PRWEB) August 08, 2013

Sun Valley gopher control is what everyone is talking about because properties are haunted by relentless pocket gophers and gopher control. Gophers are small rodents that burrow in the soil and eat the vegetation. Made famous in the movie Caddy Shack with Bill Murray, attempting to capture, drown and even use a gun on a gopher can be tricky.

A lot of Sun Valley homeowners attempt gopher extermination from ideas they get from the internet, poison bait from garden centers and drowning with a garden hose. Sometimes they do get lucky with one gopher, but they seem to just keep coming.

If left alone these pesky gophers will eat all the plants, roots and grass until nothing is left. The normal sign of gophers is the mounds of dirt on the surface. These gopher mounds are from the tunneling they make. The gopher piles also ruin the turf by smothering the grass of your Sun Valley landscaping.

At some point the grass gets patches all over and dead spots from where the gopher ate the grass. Someone can gaze out their window and see your flower jiggling. Then watch as it disappears into the ground, and disappear forever.

Fruit bearing trees and other large root trees can handle some gnawing on the roots and still be able to be OK. This chewing from gophers will stunt growth and affect the fruit production of the tree.

The solution is not simple. Sun Valley residences are challenged since they can’t purchase restricted poison and trapping requires a learning curve. Some companies sell repellents and sonic beepers, which are ineffective and should not be purchased. Most are better off hiring someone who knows how to take care of gophers. The easy way out is not always the best way.

Rodent Guys will use carbon monoxide combined with either poison or trapping. Poison is used where dogs or other pets, wildlife and kids are not at high exposure. Trapping is used where these risks are elevated. Rodent Guys will give recommendations but the customer decides which method is used.

Rodent Guys Gopher Exterminators are the most well known in Southern California including Sun Valley. They specialize in gophers, use the most modern technology and perform both traditional and dog friendly techniques.

Rodent Guys Gopher Control and Removal can be located on their website at http://www.rodentguys.com.

Rodent Guys services most of Los Angeles area including Los Angeles, Sunland, Calabasas, Pasadena, Long Beach, Azusa, Studio City, West Los Angeles, El Segundo, North Hills, Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, South Bay, Venice, Westchester, West Hollywood, Sherman Oaks, Encino, Arcadia, Monrovina, Bradbury, Duarte, Irwindale, Glendora, La Verne, San Dimas, Walnut, Diamond Bar, Claremont, Whittier, Hacienda Heights, La Mirada, Malibu, Santa Monica, El Monte, Alhambra, Temple City, San Marino, La Canada, Altadena, South Pasadena, Covina, West Covina, Pico Rivera, Pomona, Sierra Madre, La Crescenta, Montrose, Tujunga, Mission Hills, Playa Del Rey, Beverly Hills, Brentwood, Bel Air, Hollywood, West Hollywood, North Hollywood, Burbank, Glendale, Van Nuys, Simi Valley, Woodland Hills, North Hills, Chatsworth, San Fernando, Northridge, Reseda, Monterey Park, Rosemead, La Mirada, Sante Fe Springs, Norwalk, Belflower, Downey, Lakewood, Cerritos, Marina Del Rey, Rowland Heights, Montebello, Carson, Compton, Lynwood, Inglewood, Culver City, and surrounding cities..

All of Orange County is serviced for gopher control including Aliso Viejo

Anaheim, Brea, Buena Park, Costa Mesa, Cypress, Dana Point, Fountain Valley, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Huntington Beach, Irvine, La Habra, La Palma, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Nigel, Laguna Woods, Lake Forest, Los Alamitos, Mission Viejo, Newport Beach, Orange, Placentia, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano, Santa Ana, Seal Beach, Stanton, Tustin, Villa Park, Westminster, Yorba Linda

Riverside county gopher removal for Riverside, Corona, Jurupa Valley, Canyon Lake, Lake Elsinore, Lake Mathews, Eastvale, Moreno Valley, Norco and down to Murrieta are also serviced.

San Bernardino County Gopher Control is covered in Redlands, Highland, Ontario, Chino, Chino Hills, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Alta Loma, Fontana, Rialto, Montclair and surrounding areas.

Ventura County Gopher Removal in Camarillo, Fillmore, Moorpark, Newbury Park, Oxnard, Piru, Port Hueneme, Santa Paula, Saticoy, Simi Valley, Thousand Oaks, Ventura and surrounding cities.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/sun-valley-ca/gopher-control-removal/prweb11010814.htm

Article source: http://www.sfgate.com/business/press-releases/article/Rodent-Guys-Announces-They-Now-Servicing-Sun-4719153.php

Tweetery, Tweetery, Tweet: The Bird Friendly Landscape

Very late at night, not quite dawn, the insects shush and the first bird says hello. If your garden is particularly bird friendly, lots of sweet tweeting and chirping and song-of-the-morning bird music greets  you before the sun arrives. And then, during the day, more birdsong fills the garden, making it a place of sound and motion, not just color and light and fragrance. And I swear, varieties of plants that are bird friendly tend to be hardier and lovelier than other plants.

sunflower in the cutting garden at CGC

sunflower in the cutting garden at CGC

If you’d like to make your garden a place birds want to hang out, sign up for The Bird Friendly Landscape, a class offered by Sue Trusty, Horticulturalist, on Thursday, August 22nd from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. It’s fun and interesting to incorporate plants in the landscape that will attract the interest of our flying friends. The presentation reveals the secrets to attracting birds to your yard using appropriate plants and landscaping. Also learn how to make your backyard a certified wildlife habitat. Go to the Civic Garden website for registration details.

Cindy Briggs

Posted in: classes, favorite, garden, Wildlife

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Article source: http://cincinnati.com/blogs/gardening/2013/08/08/tweetery-tweetery-tweet-the-bird-friendly-landscape/

New Milford Landscaper Proposes Organic Garden Center

News







NEW MILFORD—Local landscapers want to create an organic gardening center on property located on Litchfield Road (Route 202), in the Northville section of town.

The Inland Wetlands Commission is currently conducting a public hearing on the proposal, which will continue Aug. 15 at 7 p.m. at the town hall.

Chris Bruzzi, owner of the property at 354 Litchfield Road, said he is seeking a change in zoning use from residential to mixed use to allow retail and office space, along with related landscaping and a parking area, for the creation of a retail garden center.

Mr. Bruzzi noted that he had owned the property for several years, occupying the house, and then sold it and moved to his current residence in town. Then, last year, he repurchased the Litchfield Road property, aiming to pursue his plans to create an organic garden center.

He said he had previously obtained a permit for retail sales and outdoor storage on the site.

“This has been a dream of mine, to do this, for a long time—to create a place where you can come with your family and do an activity, walk around and see our plantings and designs, eat a little something with your family, get plants and supplies, and learn about our design services,” he said.

“It would be for people who want to see what the possibilities are, in plants and design, whether they want to do it themselves or have someone do it for them,” Mr. Bruzzi said.

“It wasn’t the right time for me to do it before, but I bought the property back last year, because I want to go ahead with this now,” he said.

Mr. Bruzzi, a landscape contractor, noted he has 17 years’ experience serving customers in Connecticut and Westchester County, N.Y., with his business, Bruzzi Lawn Landscape, LLC.

According to its Web site, the services it provides include landscape design, installation and maintenance, hydroseeding, masonry, excavation and drainage. Continued…

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“We are all organic as far as what we do and what we use,” he said, regarding the services he provides for his customers and the products he uses. He noted, however, that they may not choose to be “all organic” in what they do with their own property.

According to his proposal, Mr. Bruzzi would like to use the first floor of the house on the property for retail and other uses, including a refreshment and activity area. The second floor would be used as office space by Dirk Sabin, a landscape designer based in Washington, and a library where visitors can browse horticultural books.

Mr. Bruzzi would create an office for his own use in the barn on the property, which would also store supplies, after that structure is renovated.

A patio area off of the house would also be used for activities that would be “family oriented and instructional,” Mr. Bruzzi said.

“People could come and learn about plants, pot plants or have it done for them, see how they work in a landscape, and the plants would be what are local within a few states,” he said. “They could come and do a craft, maybe even have a group do a project or have a potting activity. We plan to have different horticultural classes there.”

“I want it to be just a different place,” he said. “There would still be things like planters and mulch along with other supplies for sale, but visitors could wander around and stay awhile and see designs for ornamental and display gardens and masonry as well.”

Mr. Bruzzi said he sees the current proposal as “a small start” to fulfilling his dream on the five+-acre parcel, which is located across from Northville Fire Department on Route 202.

Commission members want more information about how the area by the river would be used and landscaped, as the property, citing 100-year-flood plain concerns.

Mr. Bruzzi said he thinks some residents in the area might be opposed to the proposal, particularly since he plans to serve food there.

“I’m thinking more of a café-like setup. I’m not going to be putting a deli here,” he said. Continued…

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  • See Full Story

NEW MILFORD—Local landscapers want to create an organic gardening center on property located on Litchfield Road (Route 202), in the Northville section of town.

The Inland Wetlands Commission is currently conducting a public hearing on the proposal, which will continue Aug. 15 at 7 p.m. at the town hall.

Chris Bruzzi, owner of the property at 354 Litchfield Road, said he is seeking a change in zoning use from residential to mixed use to allow retail and office space, along with related landscaping and a parking area, for the creation of a retail garden center.

Mr. Bruzzi noted that he had owned the property for several years, occupying the house, and then sold it and moved to his current residence in town. Then, last year, he repurchased the Litchfield Road property, aiming to pursue his plans to create an organic garden center.

He said he had previously obtained a permit for retail sales and outdoor storage on the site.

“This has been a dream of mine, to do this, for a long time—to create a place where you can come with your family and do an activity, walk around and see our plantings and designs, eat a little something with your family, get plants and supplies, and learn about our design services,” he said.

“It would be for people who want to see what the possibilities are, in plants and design, whether they want to do it themselves or have someone do it for them,” Mr. Bruzzi said.

“It wasn’t the right time for me to do it before, but I bought the property back last year, because I want to go ahead with this now,” he said.

Mr. Bruzzi, a landscape contractor, noted he has 17 years’ experience serving customers in Connecticut and Westchester County, N.Y., with his business, Bruzzi Lawn Landscape, LLC.

According to its Web site, the services it provides include landscape design, installation and maintenance, hydroseeding, masonry, excavation and drainage.

“We are all organic as far as what we do and what we use,” he said, regarding the services he provides for his customers and the products he uses. He noted, however, that they may not choose to be “all organic” in what they do with their own property.

According to his proposal, Mr. Bruzzi would like to use the first floor of the house on the property for retail and other uses, including a refreshment and activity area. The second floor would be used as office space by Dirk Sabin, a landscape designer based in Washington, and a library where visitors can browse horticultural books.

Mr. Bruzzi would create an office for his own use in the barn on the property, which would also store supplies, after that structure is renovated.

A patio area off of the house would also be used for activities that would be “family oriented and instructional,” Mr. Bruzzi said.

“People could come and learn about plants, pot plants or have it done for them, see how they work in a landscape, and the plants would be what are local within a few states,” he said. “They could come and do a craft, maybe even have a group do a project or have a potting activity. We plan to have different horticultural classes there.”

“I want it to be just a different place,” he said. “There would still be things like planters and mulch along with other supplies for sale, but visitors could wander around and stay awhile and see designs for ornamental and display gardens and masonry as well.”

Mr. Bruzzi said he sees the current proposal as “a small start” to fulfilling his dream on the five+-acre parcel, which is located across from Northville Fire Department on Route 202.

Commission members want more information about how the area by the river would be used and landscaped, as the property, citing 100-year-flood plain concerns.

Mr. Bruzzi said he thinks some residents in the area might be opposed to the proposal, particularly since he plans to serve food there.

“I’m thinking more of a café-like setup. I’m not going to be putting a deli here,” he said.

He said what he would like to see happen is for the Northville area to become more a destination for people to visit.

“My property is right next to The Silo,” he said, referring to Hunt Hill Farm. “There are shops here and the Northville Market. This would be one more place for people to come.”

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Article source: http://www.countytimes.com/articles/2013/08/08/news/doc520410ec90333097424814.txt

Backyard bounty: Landscaping can include a lot more than grass

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I do not have a green thumb. I learned long ago to avoid growing things inside or outside. I suppose I could try again, now, many years wiser and smarter, but I’ve conditioned myself that I’m just going to let yet another poor, lovely plant die.

Luckily, in many ways luckily, Jim has enough green thumbs for the both of us, so in the front yard in Austin, Texas, there is cactus, a sweet potato growing like wildfire in a pot, and a few other plants I don’t know the names of. The back yard has grapes growing on a trellis, three tomato plants that yield a few ripe tomatoes a day, and oodles of herbs — basil, sage, dill, tarragon, chives and more. That’s just outside.

When I’m down in Austin, I finally get to pick herbs for those sometimes successful vegetarian meals I make. The last one was a disaster, but at least it had nice herbs in it. Who knew baking mushrooms, broccoli and cheese in a cast iron pan on top of the stove could go so horribly wrong? At least my polenta turned out OK.

The backyard garden is a wonderful thing. When you combine beautiful landscaping practices with stuff you can eat, well, it’s perfect harmony. Our gardens aren’t meticulously landscaped — some of the herbs are in a tub — and the back yard is decorated by non-working (for now) vintage cars and a random Corvair Ultravan, along with a big wooden bar, the top of which is embedded with girly playing cards from the ’70s but someday, we might have some method to the madness.

Many can, indeed, combine well-crafted back or front yard flora with something to eat. And this, readers, is how I segue into telling you about the Slow Food Seacoast Edible Garden Tour and Gala. Boom!

All over the Seacoast, there are people with green thumbs and big appetites who combine their at-home landscapes with fruits, herbs, nuts, veggies, bees and even chickens. Slow Food Seacoast, in partnership with the Piscataqua Garden Club and Strawbery Banke Museum, will present a tour of 15 of these amazing gardens that feature an edible component in their landscape. You’ll be able to take inspiration from these gardens and maybe even do it yourself. The tour will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 11, and includes historic gardens, community gardens, school gardens and exceptional private gardens throughout Portsmouth and New Castle.

In addition to the tour, Slow Food Seacoast is hosting an Edible Garden Gala Fund-raiser from 4:30 to 7 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 10. Enjoy an evening of fine local food prepared by The Green Monkey Restaurant. You’ll gather with the community and likely a bunch of people you already know, and stroll through the beautiful edible gardens and grounds of a magnificent Kittery Point oceanside estate with specially created local brews and wines. It includes brews from Earth Eagle and Tod Mott who has made two special brews for the occasion. Admission to this “fun-raiser” includes sumptuous appetizers, beverages, and tickets for the Edible Garden Tour the following day.

If you’re a member of Strawbery Banke, Slow Food or the Piscataqua Garden Club, tour tickets are $12, $15 for non-members and the Gala and Tour together are $45 for members, $55 non-members.

Tickets can be purchased online with credit card or check at http://slowfoodseacoast.givezooks.com/events/edible-garden-tour or at Strawbery Banke Museum-Portsmouth, Rolling Green Nursery-Greenland and Wentworth Greenhouses-Rollinsford with cash or check only.

More important information and reasons to go, as if what I already wrote was not enough (lifted from their press release): If you wish to view all gardens, plan on taking most of the day. This is not a walking tour. The gardens are located in both Portsmouth and New Castle and you will need a vehicle or bicycle to reach all of them. The tour begins at Strawbery Banke Museum where each ticket-holder will receive free heirloom seeds, and a garden location guide that includes information on unique garden features, featured foods and activities. While at Strawbery Banke, participants will be invited to visit and view a variety of historic edible, organic and heirloom gardens, including the new ethnobotanical herb garden, community gardens, 17th-century raised bed kitchen gardens, immigrant gardens, victory gardens, heritage orchards, a children’s garden, and a special 1 p.m. “edible garden history tour” with John Forti, co-founder of Slow Food Seacoast and curator of Historic Landscape at Strawbery Banke. John Forti, one of my most favorite people on the planet.

Tickets support Slow Food Seacoast efforts to preserve regional heirloom biodiversity, foster local taste education, sponsor school gardens and cultivate a new generation of environmental stewards, farmers, gardeners, chefs and consumers, in order to promote locally produced, good, clean and fair food for all. Edible gardens and landscapes are the new victory gardens in the battle against genetically modified organisms, corporate agriculture and poor nutrition. They also offer a positive inter-generational opportunity for families to unplug, plant, cook and eat together while helping to foster healthier habitats and a sense of place.

What a great way to learn how to make a garden that is not only beautiful, but feeds the family, too. I’m hopeful my own knowledge will grow and my thumb will be much, much greener. I’m still going to be ruining perfectly good ingredients trying to make more diversified vegetarian meals for quite some time, though.

Rachel Forrest is a former restaurant owner who lives in Exeter (and Austin). Her column appears Thursdays in GoDo. Her restaurant review column, Dining Out, appears Thursdays in Spotlight magazine. She can be reached by e-mail at rachel.forrest@dowjones.com.

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Article source: http://www.seacoastonline.com/articles/20130808-ENTERTAIN-308080328

August Gardening

The fall planting season is still a couple of months off, so we have a ways to go as we work through the “dog-days” of summer. Here are a few tips that will, hopefully, help in making proper decisions in your landscape.

Annual flowering plants:  True annuals planted earlier in the year will sometimes need to be replaced at this time, unless they are heat tolerant. Hanging baskets of annuals may also be past their prime and may need to be replanted.

Some heat-tolerant annuals, which generally remain under 2 feet tall include:  Blue Daze, Celosia, Coleus, Dusty Miller, Lantana, Marigold, Mexican Heather, Periwinkle, Portulaca, Purslane, and Salvia.

Some heat-tolerant annuals, which may grow to be over 2 feet tall include:  Cana, Four-o’Clock, Hardy Hibiscus (Mallow), Mexican Sunflower, Rudbeckia, Salvia (such as Mealy Blue Sage), Shrimp Plant, and Sun Flower.

When the plants become too leggy and tired, trim them back.  Fertilize after pruning to encourage regrowth.

Article source: http://woodlandsonline.com/blps/article.cfm?page=1813

Caterpillar Show at Tower Hill Aug. 25

Posted by Carol Stocker

Secrets in Your Backyard will be the title of a live caterpillar show at Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston Sunday, August 25, 10am-4pm

Samuel Jaffe, life-long naturalist, trained biologist, photographer and passionate
educator, brings his “Caterpillars of Massachusetts” show to Tower Hill Botanic
Garden for those who want to get an up close and personal look at these bizarre yet fascinating garden visitors.

Jaffe, 30, is from Newton, Mass., and he earned a biology degree from Brown University,
and then worked on a study at Harvard University that examined interactions between
ants and caterpillars. He’s now an environmental education major at Antioch University
New England.

Jaffe first started taking photos of native New England caterpillars in 2008. “I did not imagine at the time the power that these images would have to open people’s
eyes to the wonders of their own back yards,” says Jaffe, “but after my first exhibit
it was clear that caterpillars were special.”

As Jaffe put it, he started his journey of exploring these bizarre native beauties
and soon realized that photography alone was not sufficient in demonstrating caterpillars’
charisma. Jaffe then organized his first caterpillar show and that’s when the Caterpillar
Project was born.

This summer, as part of the Caterpillar Project, Jaffe is touring around New England
with native live caterpillars and his photo gallery. With magnifying glasses provided,
the show offers a special glimpse into the varied and dynamic world of these wonderful
caterpillars which each have their unique way of disguising and defending themselves
in natural surroundings. The show will also reveal the secrets of caterpillars:
why they are called the “eating machines,” how they breathe and sense, and most
fascinating, their art of survival.

Caterpillars are the master of disguise. The Abbott’s

Sphinx caterpillar sports a camouflage of brown skin with green dots that run along
its body, making it look just like its host plant -the Grapevine. And you could
hardly spot the Oak Beauty caterpillars in the woods because they mimic a twig so
cleverly that there’s barely any contrast between the caterpillar and the wood.
But hiding is not always the best way to survive form predators. They also develop
some dazzling moves for their own protection. The Spicebush Swallowtail caterpillar
can perform an impressive snake mimic. And the White Furcula caterpillar, when disturbed, will inflate its two tail-looking, modified rear pro-legs and whip these tassels over and around itself.

The Live Caterpillar Show is included with regular Garden admission: $12 Adults,
$9 Seniors (65+), $7 Youth (6-18), and FREE for Tower Hill Members and Children
under 6. WOO Card holders earn points and gain discounted admission. The Garden
is located at 11 French Drive, Boylston, Massachusetts, exit 24 off Route 290.
For details and directions, call 508-869-6111 or visit the Garden’s website at www.towerhillbg.org

It is the home of the Worcester County Horticultural Society, incorporated in 1842
for the purpose of “advancing the science, and encouraging and improving the practice
of horticulture.” Located on 132 acres of garden paradise in bucolic Boylston, Massachusetts, the Garden hosts educational programs, exhibits, shows, and special events throughout the year.

Article source: http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/house/blog/gardening/2013/08/caterpillar_show_at_tower_hill.html

Gardening | Tips for planting cilantro, garlic and ginger in the Myrtle Beach area

Do you love cilantro in your food? Garlic? Ginger? They are all easy to grow when you pay attention to their individual timetables.

Cilantro is a cool-season herb. Fall is the most productive time of year to grow it. It thrives in full sun during cool weather and survives light frost.

The plant’s life cycle is faster than that of other herbs. If you are a big cilantro user you will want grow fresh cilantro most of the year. Sow seeds every three to four weeks. They germinate in seven to 10 days. From time of sowing you can harvest cilantro leaves in about four weeks and harvest the seeds (called coriander) in 45 days. You can sow seeds successively all winter. Direct sow cilantro outside in fall and grow it indoors in a pot during the coldest part of the winter.

Harvest cilantro by cutting the 6- to 12-inch outside stems close to soil level. New leaves emerge from the center of the plant. Don’t cut more than one third of the leaves at a time or you will weaken the plant.

Cilantro loses most of its flavor when dried. Keep fresh leaves coming fall through spring until the weather gets hot. When the soil reaches 75 degrees the plant will quickly bolt and go to seed.

Leaf spot and powdery mildew can affect cilantro, but good drainage and airflow along with judicious watering should prevent problems.

Grow cilantro in a sunny garden area where it can reseed. It has a taproot so it does not take well to transplanting.

Garlic is a bulbous vegetable that can be planted in mid fall. Choose a softneck variety for best results in coastal Carolina.

Plant cloves (the sections of the bulb) flat side down and pointed side up about 6 inches apart. Cover each tip with two to three inches of soil. Soil should be well drained and rich with organic material. Good drainage will help prevent fungus disease. Mulch well. Give plants about an inch of water per week. Garlic may sprout by late fall.

In the spring, feed regularly with foliar fertilizer or slow release granules. In late spring some varieties produce flower stalks with bulbils. Cut them off because they waste the plant’s energy. In June as bulbs form the plants no longer produce leaves. Stop watering, remove the mulch and allow the garlic to dry out.

Garlic is ready to harvest when most of the leaves turn yellow-brown. This should be late June or July. Dig up the bulbs. Don’t break the stalk. Tie groups of six or so together and hang them to dry in a dry shaded area with good air flow for six to eight weeks.

Ginger loves heat, humidity and filtered sun. It grows when the soil temperature reaches 68 degrees. Coastal Carolina meets these conditions part of the year. It is your choice how to handle the rest of the year.

Start ginger by root division using a piece of plump grocery store ginger. Look for a rhizome with a number of fingers, or growing tips. Soak the rhizome in warm water overnight and then cut it into pieces about two inches long. Try to include four eyes per piece. Direct plant the rhizomes in a sheltered spot with filtered sun. Well-drained sandy loam with slightly acidic pH is best. Place the eyes facing upward and cover the rhizome with one inch of soil.

Water regularly during warm weather. Mulch heavily during winter and reduce water because the plant will be dormant during cold weather. It will grow when the weather warms.

Alternately plant the divisions in good potting soil. Move your ginger inside when outside temperatures drop below 50 degrees. Maintain it in a warm spot with good humidity until spring.

Another option is to start your ginger indoors in a pot in late winter. Move the pot outside or transplant it when the weather and soil warm.

Ginger takes eight to 12 months to reach harvest time. Meanwhile, the above ground plant may reach two to four feet tall. New rhizomes are ready to harvest when leaves die back.

Plant young rhizomes for your next harvest and throw out the old starter pieces.

Storage tip: Freeze rhizomes and grate off what you need.

Cilantro, garlic and ginger each have a timetable, but they take very little maintenance along the way.

Reach DEBBIE MENCHEK, a Clemson Master Gardener, at dmgha3@aol.com.

Article source: http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/2013/08/09/3629401/gardening-tips-for-planting-cilantro.html

Autumn edibles: Tips for fall gardening and second plantings

BLOOM-Autumn-edibles1

(BPT) – People choose to garden for many reasons: Food is fresher and tastes better. It’s a healthy hobby that exercises the body. It saves money. Numerous reports show an increasing number of homeowners are growing their own fruits, vegetables and herbs.

As summer’s end nears, you may think gardening season is over. The good news is with a few strategic tips, you can keep your green thumb going and enjoy a plethora of autumn edibles for months to come. –

Step 1: Select second plantings

Second plantings are the plants you use for the latter part of the gardening season. Late summer is typically the best time to plant these varieties. Call your local extension offices or access information online to find regionalized planting schedules and recommended plant varieties.

The length of the fall season and when the first frost will likely hit are important considerations when selecting second plantings. Keep in mind that fast-maturing vegetables are ideal for fall gardening and they should be planted early enough to reach maturity before the first frost arrives.

Popular second plantings that yield a delicious late fall/early winter harvest include broccoli, lettuce, turnips, collards, carrots, peas, radish, spinach, leeks and beets. Some people even claim root vegetables and cole crops like kale and turnips taste better after the first frost.

Step 2: Prepare your garden space

If you plan to use your current garden space for second plantings, remove the early-season plants that are done producing. Add those plants to your current compost bin or create a new compost pile with easy-to-use, stylish options from Outdoor Essentials. Wood-slate bins blend well with the outdoor aesthetic and the design allows oxygen to circulate and facilitate the composting process.

Next, prepare your garden space. Elevated garden beds are growing in popularity because they look great anywhere in your yard or on your patio, and are easy to move if necessary. Raised garden beds from Outdoor Essentials elevate the plants so gardeners don’t have to bend over and risk injury. They are ideal for fall because gardeners can regulate the temperature of raised beds with ease. On hot days, move or add a shade netting to protect plants from the heat; when frost is a threat, cover the entire bed for protection.

While you’re getting your hands dirty, fall is the perfect time to plant spring flowering bulbs. A little outdoor work now and you’ll be rewarded with beautiful flowers when spring arrives next year.

BLOOM-Autumn-edibles2Step 3: Enjoy the harvest

Tend your garden daily for the best results – it may just need a quick check for pests and proper soil moisture. Typical benefits of late-season gardening include fewer bothersome bugs and the soil has better water retention.

As plants grow, pick the fruits and vegetables and enjoy Mother Nature’s bounty. If your plants become crowded, pluck a few out to help remaining plants grow roots and increase the harvest yield. You may be surprised just how many cool months your plants provide you with fresh, delicious produce.

Fall is a great opportunity to keep gardening momentum alive. So get started and decide what second plantings are best for your space. In as little as 30 days you could be eating the freshest, most flavorful vegetables you’ve ever had, all while under the gorgeous autumn sun.

 

 

 

Article source: http://cedarspringspost.com/2013/08/08/autumn-edibles-tips-for-fall-gardening-and-second-plantings/