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Archives for June 14, 2013

EAST WINDSOR: Plans for Route 33 corridor move along

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Article source: http://www.centraljersey.com/articles/2013/06/14/windsor_hights_herald/news/doc51ba480618733801880414.txt

Barrie waterfront deserves ‘loud’ plan: Shipley

Barrie Advance

Barrie’s waterfront plan isn’t bold enough for some councillors, who say the plan just doesn’t go far enough to create a destination.

The plan to upgrade the marina, create opportunities for food and sports vendors, and move the Sea Cadets to the south shore to make way for a marina building with a restaurant doesn’t create a year-round destination for residents and tourists, said Ward 3 Coun. Doug Shipley.

He’d like staff to work on partners to run programs and offer services.

“This plan is safe and a little bit boring. At $42 million, I’d hope it would be loud. We have a hidden gem: our waterfront,” said Shipley.

“Boaters don’t have a reason to make the extra travel down (Kempenfelt Bay) to Barrie. Some residents don’t know there’s a waterfront. This (proposal) does nothing to change those.”  

The plan calls for some upgrades to the marina services, some which appeal to boater Jay QuoVadis.

“I think having a restaurant right at the lake would be great. Lots of people who have boats at the marina would use it,” he said, adding some ideas of his own. “It would be nice to have dedicated parking for those of us who have slips. Even if it costs us another $100 a year, it would be great.”

The waterfront plan focuses on linking together parks, including adding a new Spirit Catcher Park, plus kiosks for paddle-board and bicycle rentals along the waterfront. Food kiosks would be situated at Johnson’s Beach and Minet’s Point parking lots.

It also ties in downtown via an expanded Memorial Square with a public gathering place and possibly include an outdoor performance centre.

The plan calls for an interpretive walking trail that tells Barrie’s history, an idea proposed by the city’s first mayor Willard Kinzie.

It also creates a park east of the Southshore Community Centre with a feature that uses flowers and landscaping to help visitors understand the conditions of various military campaigns, such as those in Holland (tulips) and Afghanistan (sand).

Transportation and Economic Development committee chairperson Coun. John Brassard wasn’t satisfied with the vision.

“We have a market of nine-million people who live within an hour,” he said. “I don’t think (the plan) is bold enough and does us any justice to create any vibrancy.”

However, Ward 9 Coun. Brian Jackson said Barrie residents don’t want tourists filling the waterfront.

“We have 100,000 people and there’s a saturation point when people will not go to the waterfront because it’s too busy. Let’s keep that in mind,” he said.

“We have to serve the people of the City of Barrie now and in the future.”

Fresh Air Family Butterfly day at Birmingham Botanical Gardens, Saturday – The Birmingham News

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Article source: http://blog.al.com/bargain-mom/2013/06/fresh_air_family_butterfly_day.html

Learn new water saving technique at garden workshop

About The Ground Up

The Ground Up is a company that applies commercial compost tea to lawn, garden and landscape projects. The tea feeds the soil for healthier plants and ecosystems. Owners Shawn Bruckman and Sam Gervais believe that healthy soil is the foundation of healthy communities. They are committed to improving soil quality for increased food production, more lush landscapes and biodiversity. For more information, contact them at shawn.bruckman@gmail.com.

Article source: http://www.vaildaily.com/news/6917108-113/garden-eagle-hugelkultur-vail

On the market: Mediterranean boasts bountiful landscaping, distinctive interiors – Westport

Live a lifestyle reflective of the French Riviera, just one hour from New York in the Mediterranean-inspired villa at 10 Bluewater Hill South in the Compo Beach section of town.

This 1.1-acre property, named Le Jardin Bleu, or the Blue Garden, contains beautiful, terraced formal flower gardens and an open meadow designed by Frederick Law Olmstead, who designed about 100 public parks throughout the nation, most notably New York City’s Central Park. The picturesque and pastoral setting includes specimen plantings and thousands of perennials that keep the gardens in bloom throughout the summer. Among the early bloomers are 75 peonies and 20,000 daffodil bulbs.

The current owners appreciate the intricately woven tapestry of color and pattern. There are so many blossoms that they adorn several rooms of their 3,674-square-foot house with vases of fresh-cut floral arrangements every day from spring to fall. They also invite friends to share the beauty.

“Where else can you find your own cutting garden and who else practically begs friends and guests to cut their own flowers and offers a choice of vases to fill, take home and keep?” said one of the current owners.

They also appreciate the house that was built in 1976 and designed in such a way that it allows stunning views from almost every room.

On one side of the house, the walls of floor-to-ceiling windows provide views of the gardens and the crescent-shaped, heated Gunite in-ground swimming pool with its long, curved and colonnaded, vine-covered pergola. On the opposite side the windows open to views of Long Island Sound.

Just as the gardens are well-designed, so too is the home’s interior. Mirrors are strategically placed to reflect the water views.

Although this property is secluded and its gardens create a private sanctuary, it is convenient to local amenities. It is within walking distance to Compo Beach and Longshore Club Park, as well as the Bluewater Hill neighborhood association beach that has a kayak launch, kayak racks and two new tennis courts.

The dramatic front entrance of the stucco house features an over-sized custom mahogany front door with a decorative, arched transom. It opens to a two-story foyer, which has a stone floor and custom, thick wood railing.

The first floor includes a family room or den with a fireplace, three bedrooms and a wine closet. One of the bedrooms has sliding doors to the gardens. The full bath features a soaking tub and bamboo flooring.

The upper level contains the main living features. The living room and formal dining room share a double-sided gas or wood-burning fireplace with a marble surround on one side and a wood inset. The dining room also has a light silver-leaf tray ceiling. The living room has French doors to a balcony.

In the recently renovated gourmet kitchen there are custom maple cabinets, granite counters, glass mosaic backsplash, a center island with two stainless steel sinks, and an eat-in area. Stainless steel appliances include a Gaggenau four-burner range top, Dacor oven, warming drawer, LG refrigerator and Miele dishwasher.

Off the kitchen is a utility room that includes the laundry area and a built-in desk area.

The master bedroom suite features a vaulted ceiling, a window seat and a marble master bath.

There is a modest annual Bluewater Hill Association fee, which covers maintenance of the private beach and tennis courts as well as road maintenance and snow removal.

For more information or to set up an appointment to see the house, contact Jillian Klaff of William Raveis Real Estate at 203-858-2095 or email her at jklaff@jillianklaff.com.

ABOUT THIS HOUSE

TYPE: Mediterranean Villa

ADDRESS: 10 Bluewater Hill South

PRICE: $3,995,000

NUMBER OF ROOMS: 9

AMENITIES: water community, views of Long Island Sound, formal flower gardens designed by Frederick Law Olmstead, crescent-shaped heated Gunite in-ground swimming pool, deeded private beach rights with kayak rack and two Hard Tru tennis courts, easy walking distance to Compo Beach, Longshore Club Park and Mill Cove Beach, generator, double-framed skylights, 1.1-acre property, coveted private cul-de-sac, three fireplaces, balcony, insulated windows, security system, audio system, exterior and landscape lighting, patios breakfast room, some window treatments, invisible fence, vaulted ceilings, privacy wall and shrubbery, wine closet, outdoor shower

OTHER INFORMATION: four bedrooms, three full and one half baths, attached three-car attached under house garage with storage and a sink, zoned forced hot air natural gas heat, no basement, attic with pull-down stairs, sewer system, city water, hardwood floors throughout, ceiling fans, cedar closets, laundry room, workshop, Bluewater Hill Association fee, shed, zoned central air conditioning, built-in bookshelves

SCHOOL: Greens Farms Elementary, Bedford Middle, Staples High

ASSESSMENT: $2,188,800

TAX RATE: 17.91 mills

TAXES: $39,201

Article source: http://www.westport-news.com/realestate/article/On-the-market-Mediterranean-boasts-bountiful-4600322.php

Landscape design, care this family’s growing business

DENNIS TOWNSHIP – Ron Barber, owner of Barber’s Fresh Meadow Nursery Inc., turns boring yards into inviting gardens for homeowners across South Jersey.


Barber, 64, of Dennis Township, designs flower gardens and landscapes for residential customers in Atlantic, Cape May and Cumberland counties.

“I kind of have a talent to know how to set plants up and put them together. I feel it’s a blessing from God,” he said. “My mother was a dance teacher. My father was a farmer. I inherited the genetics from both sides.”

For years they specialized in landscaping yards for new-home construction. But after the 2008 housing-market collapse, it expanded into maintenance contracts to spruce up yards, trim hedges and mulch flower beds.

Today, the company does both, mostly with trees and shrubs grown at its nursery in Eldora on the Delaware Bay.

For each new job, Barber’s Fresh Meadow Nursery starts with the customer’s budget.

“The budget is definitely the No. 1 factor. Then we talk about what they like. I show them the work I’ve done and get a feel for the different plants they want,” he said.

Barber grew up on the family farm in Middle Township and has a degree in ornamental horticulture from Delaware Valley College, where he studied landscape design.

Barber works with his son Brandon, 23, who lives at home surrounded by the family’s greenhouses and nursery stock in Eldora.

Brandon Barber said landscaping takes experience and flexibility.

“All landscaping is trial and error. My dad has been doing it for so long, he knows what works,” he said. “Once the landscape grows in, it becomes mounds of color. It’s really neat.”

Landscaping companies are expected to be in growing demand over the next decade as Baby Boomers retire and rely on gardening services, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The industry is expected to expand by 20 percent between 2010 and 2020.

Brandon Barber said offering his customers all-inclusive landscape service saved the business after the housing-market crash cut new orders in half.

“We took a really big hit,” he said. “We’re doing more maintenance now, which is key.”

The service includes spring and fall plantings and mulching, lawn cutting and chemical or fertilizer applications.

Brandon Barber said he has learned a lot over the years by watching his father work.

“Nobody can match his design. He designs on feel,” he said. “Things work the best when he is left alone to do his thing. He is really talented.”

His sister, Christen, helps with marketing of the business. Family businesses often magnify friction, but Brandon Barber said they get along pretty well.

“Sometimes we disagree, but we get along. He’s been calling me the boss a lot this year,” he joked.

In years to come, the family would like to expand the nursery stock for its wholesale business and continue to add more residential clients.

“I don’t want it to get so busy that I can’t spend 20 minutes talking to a client,” Brandon Barber said. “We want to keep it personal.”

Contact Michael Miller:

609-272-7217

MMiller@pressofac.com

Barber’s Fresh Meadow

Nursery Inc.

Location: 142 Powell Road, Dennis Township

Owner: Ron Barber, 64, of Dennis Township

Founded: 1970

Employees: 4

Revenue: Not disclosed

Phone: 609-861-5050

Article source: http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/business/landscape-design-care-this-family-s-growing-business/article_5def1299-b535-5f2e-8234-687c86dc0072.html

Rain Rain Go Away?

By Carol Stocker
I will be on line live Friday, June 14, 1-2 p.m. to answer your gardening questions.
Actually, all this rain is good for plant life, and humans too, as it refills aquifers and reservoirs. And after digging all those new plants into your garden, aren’t you glad you don’t have to water – yet. Never fear. The hot dry days will be here soon. Right now, we can pretend we live in the northwest where the gardens are always lush. Here’s a tip: it’s much easier to pull out weeds with taproots, like dandelions, and small self seeded trees like those pesky Norway maples, when the soil is deeply moistened like this. When you get outside this weekend, do some weeding! Those roots will slide right out of the soil with a tug. And here’s another tip…most weeds are annuals and pull up easily. This is good to know if you are weeding in a perennial garden and don’t know which are the real plants and which are the weeds.

Here’s some upcoming events at Elm Bank this summer:

June 23, Sunday
Elm Bank Antique Auto Show
Do you love old cars? Does the sight of a classic Corvette or a car
with tail fins make you smile? Then be prepared to do a lot of smiling
on Sunday, June 23rd because that’s the date of the 11th annual Elm
Bank Antique Auto Show. Elm Bank is located in Dover; its entrance is
on Route 16 on the Wellesley/South Natick town line, a mile south of
Wellesley College.

August 3, Saturday
Mass Marketplace Festival
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
New England farmers, specialty food producers, and artisans will come
together for the 17th annual Massachusetts Marketplace at the Gardens
at Elm Bank in Wellesley. Featuring homemade crafts, soaps, baked
goods, popcorn, teas, herbs, fine art, and annual plants from vendors
located throughout Massachusetts and New England.

For more information, google the Massachusets Horticultural Society.

Article source: http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/house/blog/gardening/2013/06/rain_rain_go_away.html

Tips for efficient dishwashers, drains

Your dishwasher, sink drain and garbage disposal do the major dirty work in your kitchen, and you can keep them smelling fresh and running efficiently with a few easy steps.

If there are spots or stuck-on grime on the dishes when they come out of the washer, or if the sink has an unpleasant odor even after you clean it and run the disposal, it means these hard-working appliances may need extra attention.

“Dishwashers and drains battle kitchen waste and activity daily, which can take a toll on the appearance and performance if not cleaned correctly,” said Chris Salatino with Kenmore Major Appliances.

DISHWASHERS

Electric dishwashers have a filtration system that requires regular cleaning, especially if you don’t scrape or pre-rinse dishes.

“The maintenance on a dishwasher depends on how you treat it,” says John DeSilvia, host of DIY Network’s Rescue My Renovation.

If you’re not a pre-rinser, he recommends cleaning the filter once a month. Just look at the bottom of your dishwasher, find and remove your filter, then scrub away debris with a soft brush. Rinse and reinstall.

“Don’t be scared, it’s really easy,” says DeSilvia.

If in doubt, check your owner’s manual on how to find and remove the filter. Can’t find the instructions? Log on to your manufacturer’s website. Or online tutorials at sites such as DIYNetwork.com and YouTube.com can help you through the process.

The interior of your dishwasher may also appear filmy at times. To get rid of that buildup, Salatino advises waiting until the washer has finished a cycle and cooled. Then make a paste with powdered detergent or use liquid detergent on a damp sponge to wipe away mineral deposits. Follow up by running a normal cycle.

If you’re in a hard water area and wiping with detergent doesn’t remove all the film, run a normal cycle with 2 cups of white vinegar in an upright glass on the lower rack. Salatino advises turning off the “heated dry” option during the cycle.

There also are commercial cleaners marketed especially for mineral buildup in dishwashers.

Consumer Reports recommends replacing worn or rusted dish racks, and using care when loading dishes and silverware so you don’t damage spray arms. Inspect the arms to make sure they aren’t clogged with debris, which could affect water pressure. Use pipe cleaners to dislodge blockages.

For cleaning the outside of your dishwasher, Salatino says all you need is a soft, damp cloth or sponge and mild detergent. If you’ve got a stainless steel cover, you’ll need a special cleanser.

SUPER SUDS

Phosphates, which help control water hardness, were eliminated from dishwater detergents a few years ago over pollution concerns. Since then, some consumers have complained that dishes don’t seem as clean.

Lucinda Ottusch, with Whirlpool’s Institute of Kitchen Science, says one mistake people make is buying cheap detergent. She says the all-in-one packets by name-brand companies really do help your dishwasher perform best.

She also recommends a rinse aid, which promotes drying by allowing the water to sheet off dishes.

Loading your dishwasher properly also can aid cleaning. Find tips at www.instituteofkitchenscience.com/kitchen-101/dishwashers

And, you don’t have to wait until the dishwasher is full to run a cycle. Ottusch says many newer models sense the size of a load and how dirty the dishes are, and work accordingly.

Article source: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/06/14/3449866/tips-for-efficient-dishwashers.html

GARDENING TIPS: No garden space? No problem

Life







Searching for a way to enjoy freshly grown vegetables without a garden space? Consider growing vegetables in containers on your porch, deck, patio or terrace. The gardening industry has created great options to planting in the garden soil.

A product called “Hot Potato Grow Kit” is available at www.territorialseed.com. This kit contains a cedar potato tower, seeds and bone meal. Soil is then added in layers. A second option is a “Potato Grow Bag,” a specialized fabric “pot” that can produce potatoes in any sunny location. Using this bag, seed potatoes are placed in the bag of moistened soil and covered with three inches of soil. When plants have grown to 8 inches, more inches of soil are added and this process is repeated until the bag is full. This technique encourages plants to produce a great harvest of potatoes. The “pot” is available from www.gardeners.com. Both items may also be found in local garden centers. Either container can easily fit on a deck or patio and be readily available for harvesting.

A “Strawberry Pyramid Grow Tub” that requires a mere one-square foot of space can hold 18 strawberry plants. This option on the deck or porch provides protection from the pesky garden rabbits and squirrels that usually get first dibs on the fruit. This container folds flat for easy storage. www.gardensalive.com offers this pyramid, as well as other online sources, and, again, may possibly be found in local nurseries and garden centers.

The “first ever sweet corn that can be grown in a container” is available from www.burpee.com. The corn plant not only provides two to three ears, seven to eight inches long on each stalk, but also provides vertical interest to your patio veggie garden display. Nine seeds are planted in a 24-inch container and will be ready to harvest in about two months.

Interested in growing your own mushrooms? Check out www.midwestgrowkits.com. You can also take a short field trip to the University of Michigan-Dearborn’s Environmental Interpretive Center on Evergreen Road. There are mushrooms being grown on the property just a few yards south of the center.

Pole beans with their twining vines can easily be grown in containers by using stakes and trellises. And, too, there are many varieties of grape, cherry and other small tomato plants suitable for container gardening available at local garden centers. They are generally sold as “patio” tomatoes.

Season all of these veggies with your own homegrown garlic. All you need to plant, harvest and store your own garlic indoors or on a porch, deck or patio is available from www.territorialseed.com

Take advantage of these new products and enjoy tasty a harvest from your own patio.

Jane Geisler is the Horticulture chair for the Garden Club of Dearborn. She is an advanced Master Gardener, a Master Compostor and a member of Master Gardeners’ Association of Wayne County and a member of the Henry Ford Herb Associates.

Please take a look at the Garden Club’s website at www.gardenclubdearborn.org for more information throughout the months. Have a great summer. Enjoy the flowers along Michigan Avenue in west Dearborn and at the Centennial Library. The club’s new president is Patty Mack. come meet her at the September meeting. Remember, the club meets at noon the second Monday in September through May at the First Presbyterian Church on North Brady.

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Searching for a way to enjoy freshly grown vegetables without a garden space? Consider growing vegetables in containers on your porch, deck, patio or terrace. The gardening industry has created great options to planting in the garden soil.

A product called “Hot Potato Grow Kit” is available at www.territorialseed.com. This kit contains a cedar potato tower, seeds and bone meal. Soil is then added in layers. A second option is a “Potato Grow Bag,” a specialized fabric “pot” that can produce potatoes in any sunny location. Using this bag, seed potatoes are placed in the bag of moistened soil and covered with three inches of soil. When plants have grown to 8 inches, more inches of soil are added and this process is repeated until the bag is full. This technique encourages plants to produce a great harvest of potatoes. The “pot” is available from www.gardeners.com. Both items may also be found in local garden centers. Either container can easily fit on a deck or patio and be readily available for harvesting.

A “Strawberry Pyramid Grow Tub” that requires a mere one-square foot of space can hold 18 strawberry plants. This option on the deck or porch provides protection from the pesky garden rabbits and squirrels that usually get first dibs on the fruit. This container folds flat for easy storage. www.gardensalive.com offers this pyramid, as well as other online sources, and, again, may possibly be found in local nurseries and garden centers.

The “first ever sweet corn that can be grown in a container” is available from www.burpee.com. The corn plant not only provides two to three ears, seven to eight inches long on each stalk, but also provides vertical interest to your patio veggie garden display. Nine seeds are planted in a 24-inch container and will be ready to harvest in about two months.

Interested in growing your own mushrooms? Check out www.midwestgrowkits.com. You can also take a short field trip to the University of Michigan-Dearborn’s Environmental Interpretive Center on Evergreen Road. There are mushrooms being grown on the property just a few yards south of the center.

Pole beans with their twining vines can easily be grown in containers by using stakes and trellises. And, too, there are many varieties of grape, cherry and other small tomato plants suitable for container gardening available at local garden centers. They are generally sold as “patio” tomatoes.

Season all of these veggies with your own homegrown garlic. All you need to plant, harvest and store your own garlic indoors or on a porch, deck or patio is available from www.territorialseed.com

Take advantage of these new products and enjoy tasty a harvest from your own patio.

Jane Geisler is the Horticulture chair for the Garden Club of Dearborn. She is an advanced Master Gardener, a Master Compostor and a member of Master Gardeners’ Association of Wayne County and a member of the Henry Ford Herb Associates.

Please take a look at the Garden Club’s website at www.gardenclubdearborn.org for more information throughout the months. Have a great summer. Enjoy the flowers along Michigan Avenue in west Dearborn and at the Centennial Library. The club’s new president is Patty Mack. come meet her at the September meeting. Remember, the club meets at noon the second Monday in September through May at the First Presbyterian Church on North Brady.

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Article source: http://www.pressandguide.com/articles/2013/06/14/life/doc51bb2beb8904f469717485.txt

Garden Tips: Keep lawn looking good all summer

Our unusually cool spring weather has slowed down our gardens a bit, but lawns are looking pretty good. However, once hot weather arrives, a few problems probably will start appearing. Here are some tips on how to keep your summer lawn healthy and looking good:

When the temperatures climb, dry spots in lawns often appear. Investigate the causes rather than increase the frequency of your watering. Possible causes include poor sprinkler coverage, compacted soil, buried objects like rocks or construction waste, or hydrophobic conditions.

Sprinklers: To check coverage, place empty straight-sided cans inside and outside of the dry spot. Run the sprinklers for a set amount of time, and then compare the amount of water in the cans. If there is less water, determine the cause and fix it.

Soil: Stick a long screwdriver into the soil to check for compaction and buried objects. If compaction is a problem, aerate the area with core aerating equipment.
Hydrophobic: It means the lawn or soil resists wetting. This can be caused by excessive thatch that has dried out or a soil that is hydrophobic. Check for thatch. If the thatch is greater than one-half inch think, power rake next spring.

To help water penetrate in areas of the lawn that are resisting wetting, core aerate to physically open the grass and soil. Then apply a horticultural wetting agent, which is a nonionic surfactant chemical that breaks the surface tension of water and helps the water penetrate the hydrophobic thatch or soil.

Monterey Lawn Garden sells a wetting agent mixed with fertilizer for lawns called Perc-O-Late Plus. Scotts company offers Lawn Builder and Wetting Agent, which also has fertilizer and a wetting agent.

Mowing: With warmer weather, a lawn won’t grow as fast as earlier in the season. It’s still important to mow regularly at the recommended height, which, for bluegrass (or mixes with bluegrass) lawns in our area, is 2 to 2.5 inches. It’s also important to mow using a sharp mower blade.

When you don’t mow often, you will “scalp” your lawn. Scalping is the result of removing more than one-third of the grass height. This injures the grass and causes it to use stored food reserves for new growth. Repeated scalping weakens grass, leading to thinning grass and invading weeds.

When a dull mower blade is used, it tends to shred the tips of the grass. If the blade is dull, the lawn probably will have a whitish cast to it. This is aesthetically unpleasing and damages the grass, making it susceptible to drought and disease.

Another cornerstone to keeping a lawn healthy is watering correctly and encouraging deep roots — but that’s a topic for another day.

— Marianne C. Ophardt is a horticulturist for Washington State University Benton County Extension.

Article source: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2013/06/13/2433219/garden-tips-tips-to-keep-lawn.html