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Archives for June 4, 2013

Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada and AstraZeneca Canada Working…

TORONTO, ON, Jun. 04 /CSRwire/ – On Friday, June 7, AstraZeneca Canada employees will roll up their sleeves at 18 local Boys and Girls Clubs across Canada and take on facility improvement projects as part of their annual Community Connection Day. 

Now in its third year, this company-wide initiative enables AstraZeneca Canada employees to undertake projects such as landscaping, cleaning, painting, building and gardening at their local Boys and Girls Club, while spending the day learning more about the Club’s services and the young people they serve.   

Since Community Connection Day’s inception, AstraZeneca employees have contributed over 4,000 volunteer hours to Boys and Girls Clubs, representing an in-kind donation of almost $200,000 with local Boys and Girls Clubs in Canadian communities.* In addition to their volunteer workforce, the company has provided close to $100,000 in financial funding to Boys and Girls Clubs to cover the cost of materials and event organization.

The annual Community Connection Day is linked to AstraZeneca’s Young Health Program (www.younghealth.ca), of which Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada is a proud national partner.

“AstraZeneca Canada’s commitment to young people is truly remarkable,” said Pam Jolliffe, Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada President and CEO. “Through their Young Health Program, they are committed towards working collaboratively to design programs that help youth strengthen their mental and emotional resilience. This expansion of our partnership, beyond the direct Young Health Program delivery, by providing this opportunity for their employees to dedicate a full work day toward improving our Clubs and communities reflects a great commitment to improving the lives of the young people we serve.”

Together, Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada, AstraZeneca Canada and its dedicated employees are making a significant impact in the lives of young people across the country and building stronger local communities in the process.

“Community Connection Day is something our employees look forward to each year.  The day offers an opportunity for employees to work closely with their local Boys and Girls Club and deepen their understanding of the programs and services they provide,” says Elaine Campbell, President, AstraZeneca Canada.

“Last year, I spent Community Connection Day painting the upper deck of a swimming pool at a Club in West Scarborough alongside my colleagues,” Elaine continues. “It was hard work.  It also reinforced a belief we have at AstraZeneca:  we need to work closely with our community -with Canadians – to understand the challenges and perspectives they have and how we can combine our skills, our strengths and our resources to build a healthier and more connected world.”

* AstraZeneca Canada’s community investment contributions, both monetary and non-monetary, are audited and verified by LBG Canada.

About Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada

Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada is dedicated to supporting and encouraging children and youth as they grow and develop. We are a national charity serving 200,000 young people in more than 650 locations across Canada. We listen to their opinions and ideas, applaud their accomplishments, lend support during their struggles and provide ways to explore their interests and talents.  With this encouragement they develop the confidence and sense of belonging that helps them succeed in school, form positive relationships and mature into responsible, caring adults. For over 110 years we have welcomed children, youth and their families into clubs that reflect the diversity of Canada in small and large cities, rural communities and First Nations Reserves. Visit www.bgccan.com and follow us at www.facebook.com/bgccan and www.twitter.com/bgccan.

About AstraZeneca Canada

AstraZeneca is a global, innovation-driven biopharmaceutical business with a primary focus on the discovery, development and commercialization of prescription medicines for gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, neuroscience, respiratory and inflammation, oncology and infectious disease. AstraZeneca operates in over 100 countries and its innovative medicines are used by millions of patients worldwide. AstraZeneca’s Canadian headquarters are located in Mississauga, Ontario. For more information, please visit the company’s website at www.astrazeneca.ca.

Article source: http://www.csrwire.com/press_releases/35705-Boys-and-Girls-Clubs-of-Canada-and-AstraZeneca-Canada-Working-Together-to-Build-Stronger-Canadian-Communities

Top-Notch Memphis Landscaping Company Offers Free Consultation for Summer – SYS

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MEMPHIS, Tenn., June 4, 2013 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Memphis’s best landscaping company, Sharper Image, is offering a free professional consultation to evaluate your landscaping needs. Simply mention the code INTERNET in an e-mail via their website or phone call to the company to receive this special offer. From planning out your yard to please your family and guests or setting up your commercial building’s gardens to impress clients, Sharper Image provides all the services you might need before and after.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130604/CG25773)

The expert landscape specialists do it all from planning and irrigating properly to planting and maintaining your landscape. The consultation is free and no obligation or you can continue with planning and executing an expertly maintained garden setting. The landscape experts will consult with you on every step of the way, whether the project is as simple as a few flowers or as complex as a whole front yard full of various plants and designs. Commercial properties or home landscapes are no challenge for these professionals and they can bring in just about anything necessary for your vision including decks, patios, fountains, ponds, and much more.

Irrigation is the final step to a perfectly maintainable lawn. A sprinkler system installed by Sharper Image Landscaping maximizes the performance of your irrigation system to save you money on water bills. Not only that, but it will also eliminate runoff, increase your home value, and invigorate areas of your lawn damaged by the sun and hot weather. It is also adaptable for the most eco-friendly people to use just enough water to maintain the lawn, but not overuse water. The irrigation system can also be used to fertilize your lawn to perfection. There are also maintenance services that they can provide once you are set up with a beautiful scape and optimal irrigation system. The services include mowing, edging, hedge trimming, weeding, flower bed care, pest control, and much more. Commercial buildings also need other services like fountain and pond maintenance, litter clean-up, and insecticide treatments.

About the Company

Sharper Image Landscaping is a business specializing in residential and commercial landscaping, and building relationships with each and every customer. Based in Memphis, TN, they employ detail-oriented, dependable crews with over 20 years of experience. The company is dedicated to providing the best in design, labor, materials, and maintenance and provides a free consultation to all customers. For more information, be sure to visit their website, http://www.sharperimagelandscaping.com/.

Contact:

Sharper Image Landscaping

9373 Macon Rd

Memphis, TN 38016

901-573-5002

Owner: Nathan Wisenborn

nathan@sharperimagelandscaping.com

Media Contact:

Nathan Wisenborn Sharper Image Landscaping, 901-573-5002, nathan@sharperimagelandscaping.com

News distributed by PR Newswire iReach: https://ireach.prnewswire.com

SOURCE Sharper Image Landscaping

Article source: http://www.sys-con.com/node/2685713

Calendar of Events

June 4
SENIOR ACTIVITIES: High Country Lifelong Learning
offers lectures and activities for free to adults in the area. Most activities are held at the
Lois E. Harrill Senior Center located on Poplar Grove Connector in the Watauga Human Services
Building in Boone. There will be a ranger-led hike at Mt. Jefferson State Natural Area in Ashe
County from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 4. Participants should wear sturdy shoes and bring water to
drink, as well as bring a bag lunch for a picnic after the hike. Email (high.country.lifelong@gmail.com) to request the current catalog and be placed on the email
list.

June 5
SENIOR SCHOLARS: High Country Lifelong Learning offers lectures and
activities for free to adults in the area. Most activities are held at the Lois E. Harrill Senior
Center, located on Poplar Grove Connector in the Watauga Human Services Building in Boone. HCLL
will feature a session with JoAnn Pippin, watercolor artist, who welcomes those interested in
informal sessions on painting and inspiration. Just bring your paints and equipment. The event
takes place from 9 a.m. to noon June 5 in Classroom 3 at the senior center. Email (high.country.lifelong@gmail.com) to request the current catalog and be placed on the email
list.

PHOTO WORKSHOP: An Outdoor Photo Stroll and Workshop will be held from 9 to 11 a.m.
June 5 at the Daniel Boone Native Gardens in Boone. It is a nontechnical event stressing
methods and techniques over equipment and specifically designed for flower and plant
enthusiasts who would like to take better pictures. Participants need only bring whatever camera
they currently use, and wear comfortable outdoor clothing appropriate to the morning’s weather
conditions. After 30 minutes of group instruction and discussion, the strolling begins, at which
time personalized help is available. There is no charge, although a donation or membership in
Friends of the Garden is encouraged. There is a handout, plus two 5- by 7-inch photo prints
made from images participants capture during the class. These pairs of prints will
be displayed and judged, with two selected shots made into 11- by 16-inch prints,
framed and used by the gardens until presented formally to the winners at a later date.

PANCAKE SUPPER: A fundraiser for Casting Bread Food Pantry will be held from 4 to 8:30
p.m. June 5 at FaithBridge United Methodist Church. Adult tickets are $6 and tickets for children
ages 4 to 10 are $3. Those younger than 3 eat free. Tickets are being sold at the church and will
also be available at the door.  Door prizes will be given away. The church is located at the
corner of Aho Road and U.S. 321 at 196 Aho Road.

WELLNESS: A free “Community Wellness
Jumpstart” will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. June 5 at the Watauga County Public Library, 140 Queen
St., Boone. Area wellness professionals will be providing health
information.

DEMONSTRATIONS: The Parkway Craft Center at Flat Top Manor at the Moses
Cone Estate on the Blue Ridge Parkway near Blowing Rock will offer craft demonstrations on the
porch through November. Demonstrations take place from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. and are closed for
lunch at the demonstrator’s discretion. The roster of craftspeople scheduled to appear this year
includes potter Rose Mueller (June 5-7). For more information, call the Parkway Craft Center at
(828) 295-7938.

 
June 6
HORSE SHOW: The Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show
Foundation and the Rotary Club of Blowing Rock will sponsor the 2013 Blowing Rock Charity Horse
Show this summer. The saddlebred competition will take place at the L.M. Tate Horse Show Grounds
at the Blowing Rock Equestrian Preserve June 6-9. Hunter-Jumper I takes place July 23-28 and
Hunter-Jumper II takes place July 30-Aug. 4.

QUILTERS: The Mountain Laurel Quilt Guild
will hold its monthly meeting at 1:30 p.m. June 6 in the conference room on the second floor of
the Lois E. Harrill Senior Center on Poplar Grove Connector in Boone. The guild’s new officers
will be installed, and then the group will have a reception. For more information, call Dolores at
(828) 295-6148.

AUTHOR SERIES: Elizabeth Hudson, editor-in-chief of Our State magazine,
will speak   June 6 at ASU’S Belk Library and Information Commons as part of the
library’s summer author series. Her presentation begins at 3:30 p.m. in Room 421. An informal
reception will follow. Parking will be available in the College Street deck next to the library.
For more information, call Lynn Patterson at (828) 262-2087.

June 7
CIRCLE OF COURAGE:
The children of Grandfather Home in Banner Elk invite the public to a Circle of Courage lunch and
tour from noon to 1:30 p.m. June 7.  The event is for anyone who would like to learn more
about the children and families that Grandfather Home serves. The program is free, but organizers
need to order lunch, meaning those interested should RSVP by June 5. For more information or to
RSVP, call April Miller at (828) 898-5465 or visit http://www.grandfatherhome.org.

OPEN HOUSE:
The Foscoe Volunteer Fire Department will hold an open house from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. June 7. “If you
own property in the Foscoe Fire District, you are cordially invited to attend at the main fire
station on N.C. 105 South. Come and enjoy the free food — hamburgers, hot dogs, potato salad,
coleslaw, chips and more,” a VFD spokesperson said. “For a small fee, you may vote for the
department’s board of directors. Come and see our new members and equipment.”

June
8
WHS GRADUATION: Graduation ceremonies for the Class of 2013 for Watauga High School will be
held beginning at 9 a.m. June 8 at the ASU Holmes Convocation Center.

HORTICULTURE: The
inaugural High Country Horticultural symposium will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 8 at ASU’s
Plemmons Student Union and at the Daniel Boone Native Gardens. The symposium, “Harnessing the
Beauty … Wildflowers and Native Plants,” features four speakers and an opportunity to tour the
Daniel Boone Native Gardens, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The daylong
event is designed to provide ideas from experts on plantings for landscaping gardens and homes.
Registration is $70 a person. Registration includes a continental breakfast, catered lunch,
parking and transportation and a walking tour of the gardens. Seating is limited to 100
participants. Preregistration is required and the registration deadline is May 23. Register online
at  conferences-camps.appstate.edu.

DEMONSTRATIONS: The Parkway Craft Center at
Flat Top Manor at the Moses Cone Estate on the Blue Ridge Parkway near Blowing Rock will offer
craft demonstrations on the porch through November. Demonstrations take place from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m. and are closed for lunch at the demonstrator’s discretion. The roster of craftspeople
scheduled to appear this year includes drum maker Judi Harwood (June 8-13).

WIND
ENERGY: A distributed wind energy workshop will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.  June 8. The
workshop will include a visit to a 100kW Northwind 100 turbine on the ASU campus. Cost is $200,
with lunch included; $160 for students. For more information, visit
energy.appstate.edu/workshops/287.

FLY FISHING: The Blue Ridge Mountain Club will host
a “Fly-Fishing 101” event at Chetola Resort beginning at 4 p.m. on June 8. Orvis-endorsed staff
will teach participants the basics of fly-fishing in the mountains. The BRMC will then host a
Dining Series Supper Club dinner prepared by Timberlake’s Restaurant at 6:30 p.m. at the Watson
Gap Pavilion. Adult beverages are BYOB. For more information, call (828) 295-8667.

CRESTON SINGING: A Saturday night singing will be held at 7 p.m. June 8 at Mountain
View Baptist Church in Creston. Featured will be New Vision from Bellville,
Ohio.

CARNIVAL: Deerfield Ridge Assisted Living will be hosting its first Community
Carnival on June 8at 287 Bamboo Road, Boone. There will be games, a bouncy house, an inflatable
bull ride, carnival foods, music and more. The event is free, along with all the games, food and
prizes. Contact Jen Teague for additional information at (828) 264-0336.

June
9
NATURE PROGRAM: Join an Elk Knob State Park ranger at 2 p.m. June 9 to learn about
salamanders and how they are great indicators of the state of the environment. Through a
PowerPoint program, those attending will learn about the native salamanders found at Elk Knob
State Park. Afterwards, the group will see if they can find any in the park. Meet at the Elk Knob
State Park Office. For more information, call (828) 297-7261.

June 10
HEALTHY
LIVING: The Living Healthy Program is a six-week education group designed to help people learn how
to live a healthier life with a chronic condition. The free program will be held at the Lois E.
Harrill Senior Center in Boone from 9:30 a.m. to noon Mondays, beginning June 10.  Call (828)
265-8090 to register.

CLUB MEETING: The High Country Torch Club will meet at noon June
10 at the Golden Corral in Boone. The program will feature John McNeely on “Energy Options.” For
more information, contact Bettie Bond at (828) 264-4275.

JUNE IN BLOOM: Blowing Rock
will host a number of events for plant enthusiasts as part of its “June in Bloom” celebration. On
June 10, the “Herbs for the Fun of It” luncheon and presentation will take place at the Green Park
Inn with Pat Collins, president of the Blowing Rock Garden Club. The event starts at 10:30 a.m.
and costs $25 per person. On June 17, the “Tea Leaves and Bloomers” event, a tea, talk and garden
tour, will take place at the Gideon Ridge Inn. It starts at 2 p.m. and the cost is $20. On June
18, Roger Robertson, owner of The Last Straw, will present “Creating Designs for Outdoor Living”
at his store on Main Street. The event takes place at 1 p.m. and the cost is $5. The “Hostas of
Blowing Rock” brunch and home garden tour will meet at 9:45 a.m. at Timberlake’s Restaurant at
Chetola Resort on June 24. Susan Sweet, co-chairwoman of the Mile of Flowers, will lead the tour.
The cost is $18. For more information on the events, call (828) 295-7851.

BENEFIT GOLF:
A Centennial Golf Tee Off to benefit Grandfather Home will be held June 10 at Hound Ears Club,
located of N.C. 105. The format will be a captain’s choice and participants will be able to
participate in the “On Course Activities” during the day’s event. Cost is $175 per player and $650
per team. For reservations, call Melynda Martin Pepple at (828) 898-5465 or email (m.pepple@grandfatherhome.org)

 
June 11
SENIOR SCHOLARS: High Country Lifelong
Learning offers lectures and activities for free to adults in the area. Most activities are held
at the Lois E. Harrill Senior Center, located on Poplar Grove Connector in the Watauga Human
Services Building in Boone. There will be a bird walk with the High Country Audubon Society from
8:30 to 10 a.m. June 11 at the Daniel Boone Native Gardens in Boone. Beginners are welcome.
Participants will meet at the stone gatehouse and should wear comfortable shoes, as there will be
a hike to the summit of Strawberry Arboretum. Email (high.country.lifelong@gmail.com) to request the
current catalog and be placed on the email list.

SENIOR SCHOLARS: High Country Lifelong
Learning offers lectures and activities for free to adults in the area. Most activities are held
at the Lois E. Harrill Senior Center, located on Poplar Grove Connector in the Watauga Human
Services Building in Boone. HCLL welcomes JoAnn Pippin, watercolor artist, who will present the
program, “Watercolor Just for Fun” (session 1), from 9 a.m. to noon June 11 at the senior center.
The class will be limited to 12 participants. The first session’s topic is “Color and Creativity.”
The fee for materials is $10. Email (high.country.lifelong@gmail.com) to request the current catalog
and be placed on the email list.

SENIOR SCHOLARS: High Country Lifelong Learning offers
lectures and activities for free to adults in the area. Most activities are held at the Lois E.
Harrill Senior Center, located on Poplar Grove Connector in the Watauga Human Services Building in
Boone. HCLL welcomes Sandie Gravett who will present the program, “Changing Religious Landscape in
America,” from 2 to 3:30 p.m. June 11 at the senior center. Email (high.country.lifelong@gmail.com) to request the current catalog and be placed on the email list.

June 13
SENIOR
SCHOLARS: High Country Lifelong Learning offers lectures and activities for free to adults in the
area. Most activities are held at the Lois E. Harrill Senior Center, located on Poplar Grove
Connector in the Watauga Human Services Building in Boone. HCLL welcomes Gwen Robbins-Schug from
the anthropology department at Appalachian State University. Robbins-Schug will present the
program, “Harappa — Indus Civilization,” from 10 to 11:30 a.m. June 13 at the senior center.
Email (high.country.lifelong@gmail.com) to request the current catalog and be placed on the email
list.

SENIOR SCHOLARS: High Country Lifelong Learning offers lectures and activities
for free to adults in the area. Most activities are held at the Lois E. Harrill Senior
Center,  located on Poplar Grove Connector in the Watauga Human Services Building in Boone.
HCLL welcomes Lynne Getz, who will present the program, “Prior to the Pilgrims: European Activity
in North America Before Plymouth,” from 2 to 3:30 p.m. June 13 in the senior center. Email (high.country.lifelong@gmail.com) to request the current catalog and be placed on the email
list.

HIGH COUNTRY WRITERS: High Country Writers will host author, Albert A. Bell Jr.,
as program speaker from 10 a.m. to noon June 13 at the Watauga County Public Library in Boone.
Bell’s writing career spans the decades since 1972 and genres from mystery novels, historical
novels, children’s books, the New Testament and baseball. High Country Writers is an organization
which fosters the growth and creativity of writers of all genres. Guests are welcome. For more
information, visit highcountrywriters.tripod.com.

June 14
DEMONSTRATIONS: The
Parkway Craft Center at Flat Top Manor at the Moses Cone Estate on the Blue Ridge Parkway near
Blowing Rock will offer craft demonstrations on the porch through November. Demonstrations take
place from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. and are closed for lunch at the demonstrator’s discretion. The
roster of craftspeople scheduled to appear this year includes woodworker David Crandall (June
14-16). For more information, call the Parkway Craft Center at (828) 295-7938.

June
15
JUNALUSKA JUBILLE: Boone’s historic Junaluska community will hold its second annual
Junaluska Jubilee on June 15 at the Boone Mennonite Brethren Church on Church Street in Boone.
Junaluska is one of Western North Carolina’s oldest continuously occupied African-American
settlements. At 11 a.m., there will be a celebration  of the life and leadership of the Rev.
Morris Rockford “Rock” Hatton Sr.  Hatton served during the 1930s to the 1960s as a 
pastor of the 11 Mennonite Brethren churches in the North Carolina District of Mennonite Brethren
Churches. Entertainment scheduled to begin at 1:30 p.m. in the church will include storytelling, a
magic show and a performance by the Boone Mennonite Brethren Gospel Choir. Admission is free. The
Junaluska neighborhood and the church are located off Queen Street, where parking for the event
will be available. For further information, call (828) 264-6578.

FUNDRAISING CONCERT:
Violinist Gil Morgenstern and flutist Akal Dev Sharonne will perform at 8 p.m. June 15 for a
fundraising concert at the Temple of the High Country, which is located at 1043 King St., Boone.
The fundraiser will help provide funds for the temple. Tax-deductible tickets are $40 and are
available at the Temple of the High Country, (828) 266-9777 or by calling Erika Siegel at (828)
783-8090.

CRAFTS FAIR: A Beech Mountain Arts and Crafts Fair will be held from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. June 15 at the Buckeye Recreation Center at Beech. For more information, visit
http://www.beechrecreation.org or call (828) 387-3003.

TRAIL WORK: Volunteer trail workdays at
Grandfather Mountain State Park will be held each month through October. Times will be 9:30 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Join park rangers and help fix sections of the park. No experience or tools are needed.
Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes (no flip flops or sandal style shoes are permitted) and bring work
gloves (leather preferred), comfortable work clothes, snacks and beverage (nonalcoholic). For more
information, call (828) 963-9522. Volunteer Work Days are scheduled for the third Saturday of each
month through October. Meeting destinations to be determined. Workdays are June 15, July 20, Aug.
17, Sept. 21 and Oct. 19.

SUMMER THEATER: Ensemble Stage Company has announced its
schedule of summer theater events for 2013. The summer season opens with the funny and
heartwarming “Searching for Eden,” on stage June 15-23. Next is the psychological thriller
“Mindgame,” on stage July 6-14. The dramatic comedy “A Bench in the Sun” is presented July 27-Aug.
4. The season closes with the comedy “Bedside Manners,” Aug. 24-Sept. 1. All shows are presented
at the Blowing Rock School Auditorium. Tickets are $19 for adults, $17 for students, and $10 for
children 16 and younger. Adult season tickets are available for $68 per person or $60 for seniors,
students and military personnel. For more information, call (828) 414-1844, or visit
http://www.ensemblestage.com.

BENEFIT AUCTION: The second annual “Hungry Hearts” Live and Silent
Auction will be held from 4:30 to 7 p.m. June 15 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Boone. The live
auction will begin at 5:45 p.m. A $5 donation is requested at the entrance. The auction includes
art from area artists. Beer, wine and soft drinks available for purchase.All proceeds benefit the
nonprofit restaurant, FARM Cafe. Cullie Tarleton will lead the live auction. For more information,
contact Tracey Thompson at (828) 963-6511, extension 243.

June 16
HIKE: Elk Knob State
Park will offer a free wildflower hike at 2 p.m. on June 16; meet at the Elk Knob Summit
Trailhead. Boots are recommended. The hike is weather dependent. Call the park office if the
weather is questionable at (828) 297-7261.

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL: Perkinsville Baptist
Church’s Vacation Bible School, “God’s Backyard Bible Camp,” is scheduled for June 16-20. Register
online at perkinsvillebaptistchurch.com or call (828) 264-8605 for more information.

June
17
DEMONSTRATIONS: The Parkway Craft Center at Flat Top Manor at the Moses Cone Estate on the
Blue Ridge Parkway near Blowing Rock will offer craft demonstrations on the porch through
November. Demonstrations take place from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. and are closed for lunch at the
demonstrator’s discretion. The roster of craftspeople scheduled to appear this year includes
engraving artist Jay Pfeil (June 17-19). For more information, call the Parkway Craft Center at
(828) 295-7938.

June 20
FUNDRAISER: Imaginary Friends Ensemble, in conjunction with
the Hunger and Health Coalition, will present a concert to benefit Boone’s hungry at 7:30 p.m.
June 20 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 170 Councill St., Boone. Canned food donations are
requested for admission. For more information, visit (clarinetcouture@gmail.com) or
musicimagination.com.

June 21
DEMONSTRATIONS: The Parkway Craft Center at Flat Top
Manor at the Moses Cone Estate on the Blue Ridge Parkway near Blowing Rock will offer craft
demonstrations on the porch through November. Demonstrations take place from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
and are closed for lunch at the demonstrator’s discretion. The roster of craftspeople scheduled to
appear this year includes tapestry weaver Sandy Adair (June 21-23) and block printer Ellie Kirby
(June 21-23). For more information, call the Parkway Craft Center at (828) 295-7938.

GROUNDBREAKING: Lees-McRae College in Banner Elk will break ground on the May School
of Nursing and Allied Health at 11 a.m. on June 20 at the Stinson parking lot on on West Main
Street, across from Tate Lawn. The community is welcome to attend the ceremony. Designed by
McMillian Pazdan Smith, the 18,000-square-foot facility will soon be the cornerstone of the
college’s expanded science and health-related programs. For more information on nursing and allied
health at LMC, visit go.lmc.edu/nursing-allied-health or contact the Admissions Department at
(800) 280-4LMC or (admissions@lmc.edu)

June 21
WRITER’S WORKSHOP: A Writer’s Workshop
for both beginner and experienced writers will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 21 at the
Watauga County Public Library will be of interest to both experienced and beginning authors who
want to hone their skills. The workshop highlights a range of topics from writing for young
readers, screen writing and tips on developing a story’s setting.  Presenters include
award-winning authors and publishers. The event is sponsored by Friends of the Watauga County
Public Library in connection with the second annual High Country Festival of the
Book.  A light breakfast plus lunch is included in the price of the workshop.
Tickets may be purchased at the library or online at  http://www.highcountryfestivalofthebook for $40
($20 of which is tax deductible). For more information, visit
http://www.highcountryfestivalofthebook.com or the display at the Watauga County
Library.

 
RUMMAGE SALE: The 32nd annual Watauga Humane Society Rummage Sale will
be held June 21 and 22 at the National Guard Armory in Boone. The two-day sale is open to the
public from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. For those who would like to give donations of antiques, working
appliances, books, computers, crafts, furniture, jewelry or more, take your donations to Blue
Skies Storage, 482 State Farm Road in Boone, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Mondays. After
pulling into the Blue Skies parking lot, make an immediate right and continue around the building
to Door No. 5. Signs will be posted to mark the door where volunteers will help you. Those who
would like to take items to the National Guard Armory the week of the sale, drop off donations
between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Wednesday. For more information, phone Dee
at 264-9116 or email (deedundon@bellsouth.net)

June 22
GEOLOGY HIKE: Mount Jefferson
State Natural Area in Ashe County will hold a geology hike at 2 p.m. June 22; meet at the picnic
shelter. Several types of geological formations will be seen on this mountain hike. Metamorphic
formations and intrusive quartz are located on the trail. Wear appropriate shoes or boots. The
program is free. For more information, call (336) 246-9653.
PARK CAMPOUT: Families who have
never experienced the joys of camping are invited to join the staff at Elk Knob State Park for an
evening under the stars on   Saturday, June 22, through Sunday morning, June 23.
Participants may come no earlier than 3 p.m. to start setting up, and activities begin at 4 p.m.
The park will provide tents (if needed), a dinner of hot dogs chips and s’mores that participants
will cook over a campfire, and activities and learning experiences throughout the night.
Participants should bring snacks, nonalcoholic drinks, breakfast for Sunday morning and blankets
or sleeping bags. All campers must be 6 years or older and children must be accompanied by a
parent or guardian. The event is free but space is limited; call (828) 297-7261 by June 20 to
register or for more information.

DEMONSTRATIONS: The Parkway Craft Center at Flat Top
Manor at the Moses Cone Estate on the Blue Ridge Parkway near Blowing Rock will offer craft
demonstrations on the porch through November. Demonstrations take place from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
and are closed for lunch at the demonstrator’s discretion. For more information, call the Parkway
Craft Center at (828) 295-7938. The roster of craftspeople scheduled to appear this year includes
clay artist Rose Mueller (July 22-24).

June 23
BOWLING BENEFIT: The Relay For Life
team, Joyce’s Memory Walkers, will sponsor its 12th annual bowling event, Strike For Life,
honoring Betty Hayes on June 23. There will be an entry fee of $25 per person, which covers two
games of Scotch doubles, shoe rental, food and drinks. Squads may choose to bowl from 2 p.m. to 4
p.m. or 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. There will also be a 50-50 drawing. To register and for more information,
call Larry Hayes at (828) 273-1903, Denise Stahl at 773-9756 or Deborah Kirksey at
964-1800.

NATURE HIKE: Mount Jefferson State Natural Area in Ashe County will hold a
nature hike at 2 p.m. June 23; meet at the picnic shelter. Hike the ridgeline of Mount Jefferson
and explore the natural world of wildflowers and wildlife on the summit and rhododendron trails.
Natural history and folklore will be discussed. Appropriate clothing and sturdy footwear are
recommended. The program is free. For more information, call (336) 246-9653.

June
25
IRS SEMINAR: CCCTI’s Watauga Small Business Center will offer the final seminar in its
IRS series, “IRS Series: Part 4 — Putting It All Together,” from 5 to 6:30 p.m. June 25 at the
Watauga County Public Library in Boone.  To register online for the seminar, visit
  http://www.cccti.edu/smallbusiness and click on Watauga County. For more information, contact
Evelyn Asher at (828) 263-5371.
 
 
June 24
DEMONSTRATIONS: The Parkway
Craft Center at Flat Top Manor at the Moses Cone Estate on the Blue Ridge Parkway near Blowing
Rock will offer craft demonstrations on the porch through November. Demonstrations take place from
10 a.m. until 4 p.m. and are closed for lunch at the demonstrator’s discretion. The roster of
craftspeople scheduled to appear this year includes raku-style clay artist Lynn Jenkins (June
24-30). For more information, call the Parkway Craft Center at (828) 295-7938.

June
27
BLOOD DRIVE: Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute’s Watauga Campus will host a
Red Cross Blood Drive from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on June 27 in the student lounge. For more
information, call Diane Mazza at (828) 297-2185.

June 29
FESTIVAL: Riverfest returns
to Valle Crucis Community Park June 29. Riverfest is currently seeking demonstrators and nonprofit
vendors with a focus on natural resources and sustainability. To be a part of Riverfest 2013,
contact Ashley Wilson at (ashley@wataugariverpartners.org)

June 30
HIKE: Elk Knob
State Park will offer a free nature hike at 2 p.m. June 30. Participants will hike as they learn
about the flora and fauna of the park at they hike; meet at the Elk Knob Summit Trailhead. Boots
are recommended. The hike is weather dependent. Call the park office if the weather is
questionable at (828) 297-7261.

Article source: http://blowingrocket.com/Events/story/Calendar-of-Events-id-003512

Rice garden featured in Garden Gala tour

Garden Gala - Rice Garden

Garden Gala – Rice Garden

The Rice garden is located at 352 E. Mill St., Circleville.




Posted: Monday, June 3, 2013 2:42 pm
|


Updated: 8:49 pm, Mon Jun 3, 2013.


Rice garden featured in Garden Gala tour

On the tour this year will be the Rice Garden, 352 E. Mill St. Bill and Patty Rice began their adventure in gardening and landscaping with virtually a “clean slate” in May of 2005.


Their adventure began when they built a patio at the back of their home. Next, they had a Koi pond added only a stone’s throw away from the patio. They graced the pond with a wooden bridge which permits explorers to choose their next destination. Blue, Blacky, Goldie, Old Yellow, Karl D. and several other Koi goldfish along with roaming frogs call this pond home.

Bill improved their home’s curb appeal and landscape by using charcoal landscape block to build flower gardens and retaining walls in the front, along the side and in the back of their home. A white wood picket fence was added around the backyard for traditional charm and to keep the Rice’s black and white cocker spaniel companions, Mia and Charlie, from wandering.

Eventually, they built a large pergola over the patio and created a sense of unity by having the patio and the sidewalk leading to their detached garage, stenciled with a gray flagstone pattern.

Bill used recycled red patio pavers to build a second patio in one corner of the backyard. He used the same red pavers to create a sidewalk behind and around the end of the garage. This area is blessed by a small vegetable garden. The Rice’s have been growing a nice assortment of vegetables, raspberries and strawberries in this space.

Large quarry stone was recycled and used to create a quaint and peaceful path between themselves and their neighbors. A small recycled greenhouse found a new home along this same path last summer.

Many of their flowers and bushes were given to them by friends, family members and neighbors. There are a variety of annual and perennial flowers, shrubs and trees.

Several water features are strategically placed in the backyard along with a couple of traditional bird baths.

Bill and Patty didn’t really plan their adventure. In time, everything just seemed to come together. They enjoy gardening and landscaping and find it to be a great escape from everyday responsibilities and stress. Their future plans are to enhance their gardening skills by becoming more knowledgeable about gardening.

They would like to show you how you can easily change your “clean slate” into a great hobby or your own personal getaway. Although they consider themselves amateurs, their efforts are recognized and complimented by others who have seen their work.

email @ nradciff@circlevilleheraldcom

on

Monday, June 3, 2013 2:42 pm.

Updated: 8:49 pm.


| Tags:


Circleville Herald

Article source: http://www.circlevilletoday.com/lifestyles/rice-garden-featured-in-garden-gala-tour/article_7cac34d8-7a10-51f9-8089-a00c3b934363.html

BHS Landscaping Class Gives some TLC to Margie Michael Learning Garden

Brownwood High School’s landscaping class recently worked on the Margie Michael Learning Garden at Woodland Heights Elementary.  The class is led by Mitzi Cockerham, Mrs. Michael’s daughter.

The garden was dedicated to honor the memory of Woodland Heights Elementary teacher Margie Michael on May 12, 2011.

Michael taught for 37 years, 7 of them at Woodland, and was a big part of the original learning gardens at the school.  Upon her sudden passing, coworkers Christy Wilson and Woodland Heights then principal Bob Turner came up with the idea of a memorial garden in her name.  Turner was instrumental in securing a $10,000 grant from the Goodies Corporation that, according to Roberts, made the idea turn into something so much bigger and better.

Pictured above is the Brownwood High School Landscaping class at the garden.  Pictured below, Mitzi Cockerham’s landscaping class works on the Margie Michael Learning Garden at Woodland Heights Elementary.  Photos contributed.

Article source: http://www.brownwoodnews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=12209:bhs-landscaping-class-gives-some-tlc-to-margie-michael-learning-garden&catid=36:life&Itemid=59

DeFranco Landscaping Inc. works to protect Lake George by limiting pollution … – Glens Falls Post

HAGUE — It was Lake George that drew Tony DeFranco back to this northern Warren County town to work for his family’s firm, which has a growing aim to plant landscaping features that protect the lake from pollutants.

DeFranco returned three years ago to work with his father at DeFranco Landscaping Inc. in Hague, the business David DeFranco started in 1984.

The younger DeFranco’s interest in coming back to the area was piqued in part by projects like the West Brook Environmental Initiative in Lake George.

“If something happened to this lake, we wouldn’t have this business,” DeFranco said. “Tourism is what we have here in the Adirondacks, in Lake George.”

The family-owned firm, which has counted all five of the DeFrancos (both parents and three children) as employees at one point or another, has found a niche in northern Warren County — combining landscaping with stormwater and erosion control and property management.

Tony DeFranco, a professional engineer, also does consulting work and has expanded the scope of the business. When his father retires one day, DeFranco will take over the nearly 30-year-old business.

Much of their business comes from owners of seasonal properties, where the DeFrancos put shoreline buffers and rain gardens on the properties that are meant to be another line of defense in filtering pollutants from runoff before it enters the lake.

In the past two years, the firm has put in about 20 rain gardens, mostly at shoreline properties, which are depressions meant to catch runoff from nearby roofs or driveways before it enters the lake in a pollutant-filled stream.

DeFranco crews wrap rocks in fabric and bury them in soil, and then plant native plants in the rain garden.

The gardens are designed to soak up a large amount of liquid. Some of the water is held in the voids between the rocks beneath the soil, and the native plants take on many of the pollutants and nutrients in the water.

Climate change is also starting to change how certain elements are designed and what the rain gardens can accommodate, as weather patterns shift toward more severe but less frequent rain events, DeFranco said.

The rain gardens essentially mimic wetlands, and are all unique based on the property where they’re located.

But the DeFrancos have a mix of clients, including commercial clients, in the area they serve in northern Warren and Essex counties.

The DeFrancos over the years have observed changes in the guidelines of regulatory agencies for site design that’s meant to have a minimal environmental impact, and may be seeking approval from three to five agencies on any given project depending on where it’s located. Those agencies can include the Lake George Park Commission, the Adirondack Park Agency, the state Department of Environmental Conservation, the Army Corps of Engineers, as well as town planning and zoning boards.

“As soon as you trigger one thing, you trigger another, then another,” David DeFranco said.

The layout of lakefront properties has changed in the past few decades, as many homes built in the 1960s and 1970s were as close to the water as possible for the view, and regulatory agencies and environmental groups have since begun emphasizing a larger setback from the water that gives lakefront property owners a more “filtered” view of the water. Stormwater management techniques have also been increasingly horticultural, Tony DeFranco said.

DeFranco brings his engineering background and the ability to decipher regulations, which combine with his father’s scientific and landscaping background, to create a “one-stop design and build process,” DeFranco said.

Some of the DeFrancos’ clients ask for landscaping features like rain gardens on their own, while others are required to have the features on their property for stormwater management, Tony DeFranco said.

DeFranco sees resistance among some clients to planting shoreline vegetation meant to act as a buffer between a structure and the lake, because they’re often concerned it will grow too tall and block their “million-dollar view,” he said.

One of the challenges of working with so many seasonal clients is that DeFranco has some downtime in the winter when he could be doing project designs to install in the spring, but the seasonal residents are on a different schedule — getting to the area in May and wanting to start the process then. DeFranco does a lot of design work at night to accommodate that, he said.

Many of the clients he encounters on Lake George’s north end are interested in educating themselves about sustainable landscaping for their properties that can help reduce runoff, DeFranco said.

“I think people up here realize the value of their home and how they enjoy the lake is tied to what they do to protect it,” DeFranco said.

Editor’s note: This is a regular series focusing on interesting local businesses and the ways they survive, thrive and innovate. Local business owners with stories to tell about their new or established businesses are invited to contact The Post-Star.

Article source: http://poststar.com/news/local/defranco-landscaping-inc-works-to-protect-lake-george-by-limiting/article_5dd901e2-ccc5-11e2-888a-0019bb2963f4.html

June Gardening Tips

There is still time to plant heat-tolerant summer annuals.  Just be sure to water transplants as needed until roots become established.

Remove faded flowers from plants before they set seed—this will encourage them to continue flowering.

Frequent mowing (every four to five days) is best for your grass and helps to reduce weeds by preventing seed heads from forming. 

A light application of fertilizer every four to six weeks will help keep annual flowers healthy and blooming.

Treat pecans with a spray application of zinc and a soil application of nitrogen.  Irrigate your trees regularly to help improve their overall health and provide adequate nutrition for nut production.

Check for insects and diseases on plants, trees, and shrubs.  Spider mites may become troublesome now that the weather is warming up.  Be very careful if applying any pesticides—application during warm weather can lead to chemical burns on the leaves of your plants. 

June is a great time to select day lily varieties as they reach their peak of bloom—you are able to see the colors of the blooms and make your selections more wisely.

Continue to spray roses for black spot and insects.  Funginex, Rose Defense, Daconil, and Captan are suitable fungicides for treatment of black spot.  

Look for problems on tomatoes.  Blossom-end rot appears as a sunken brown spot on the bottom of the tomato.  This is caused from irregular watering.  Mulch plants and keep them moist to help prevent this problem.  Early blight—plants have yellow blotches or dark circular spots with concentric markings.  Spots occur on lower leaves first.  Apply an approved fungicide at seven to ten day intervals.  Curly-top—Leaves curl and cup upward and turn light green to yellow with purple veins on the lower sides.  Remove infected plants from the garden and destroy them to keep from infecting other plants in your garden.

Water lawns and gardens thoroughly but not too frequently.  Soak to a depth of about six inches.  Watering in the early morning or late evening will help to eliminate problems with evaporation due to high winds. 

Conserve moisture in the soil around plants by mulching.  Apply three to six inches of mulch, depending on the material used—coarser materials will need to be deeper than finer ones. 

If moving houseplants outdoors for the summer, be careful not to place them into direct sunlight—they are no longer accustomed to such intense light and plant leaves can be severely burned. 

Article source: http://ktep.org/post/june-gardening-tips

Planting for Wildlife

By Carol Stocker
The Garden Club of America is helping to fund a 3300 square foot native shrub garden which will be planted June 2 at the Trailside Museum in Milton by the Milton Garden Club.

The New England Wild Flower Society grew the trees and shrubs and made a selection based on native plants found in New England woods, that create food and habitat for birds. If you are interested in doing this kind of planting yourself, here’s their list:

Amelanchier canadensis, shadblow tree, two, berries, 25×15.

Aronia arbutifolia, two, berries 6×6 (suckers)

Aronia melancarpa, two, berries 4×6 (suckers)

Cercis candensis var candensis, redbud, two, 25 x 25

Clethra ainifolia Hummingbird, 3×5

Cornus florida Heritage, a GCA anthracnose resistant selection.

Hamamelis virginiana, suckers, likes a moist spot, 15 x 2

Hydrangea arborescens Annabell, wants shade, 4×6 (from Missouri)

Ilex glabra Compacta, five, moisture, evergreen, 4×5

Ilex verticillata, Southern Gentleman, pollinator male, 9×9

Ilex verticillatam Winter Red, three females, bright red berries, 7×7

Kalmia angustifolia Kennebago, sheep laurel, moist, likes peatmoss, 2×4

Kalmia latifolia Carousel, two, mountain laurel, evergreen, likes moisture and rocks, 10×10

Salix discolor, pussy willow, catkins in late winter, suckers, 10×15

Sanbucus candensus, three,berries, including one dark leaved, 9×9

Viburnum acerifolium, suckers, two, berries, 5×5

Vaccinium corymbosum, highbush blueberry, berries, seven, two kinds for cross pollination, 7×7

Viburnum dentatum, straight branches used for Indian arrows, hence the name arrowwood, two, berries, 8×10

Don’t have 3300 square feet? Proven Winners, the company that has introduced so many high performance annual flowers for containers, has been expanding into shrubs bred for compactness for backyard gardens.

They are introducing two new varieties of Arrowwood Viburnums that only grow to 5X5, called “All That Glitters” and “All That Glows.” The reason for two different varieties is so they can cross pollinate and produce loads of the gorgeous blue berries that are so popular with birds. This is a great way to attract birds to your yard in a small space and would make an ecologically sound foundation planting. And they are deer resistant.

To clear up any confusion, these are not our native New England arrowwood, V. dentatnum, but a south eastern plant called limerock arrowwood, or V. baracteatum. But it is cold hardy here, and is endangered in the wild. And it seems to do ok in our acid soil, too.

Other new shrubs being introduced these years by Proven Winners includes a yellow needled minature arborvitae, Filip’s Magic Moment, which could substitute for Dwarf Alberta Spruce if you have a couple of yours that have outgrown their containers. There is also a new Spirea (yawn!) called Glow Girl with lime foliage that is 4×4, which still seems too big for me – I’d like to see a really small one. And of course PW has a new version of the ever popular blue reblooming Hydrangea Macrophylla. Let’s Dance Blue Rhapsody blooms amethyst blue and stays small enough for gardens (3×3).

Article source: http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/house/blog/gardening/2013/06/planting_for_wildlife.html

Brooker: Gardening tips for the greenest of greenhorns

I once had the pleasure, somewhat dubious in retrospect, of writing a profile on an award-winning Calgary garden. What a piece of work that yard was. That thing had it all.

It displayed English country garden traits, but that was just the beginning. There was also an alpine rockery, tiered perennial beds, a robust vegetable patch with starter greenhouses, cobbled pathways and roughly several hundred other desirable features.

As I understood it, however, the husband-and-wife team could only keep up with its punishing demands by foregoing sleep for four months a year. Deadheading alone took up most of the sunlit hours. The four-bin compost system – who knew about that one? – is a process that appeared to require a graduate degree.

There was also careful xeriscaping, as I recall, and just in case their terrestrial make-work program wasn’t gruelling enough, they had a koi pond.

No wonder people give up before they start. Who can hope to emulate that level of diligence?

Still, they try. I seem to have numerous friends in their mid-life who suddenly feel compelled to get in the slug-herding game. As someone who has raised a few tasty crops in recent years, they often ask me how to get started.

“First of all,” I used to say, “ask someone who’s an expert, not me.” But that wasn’t terribly helpful, so now I actually dispense advice, but only advice tailored to the greenest of greenhorns.

If you’re one of those, allow me make a few recommendations. Yes, I know we’ve passed the magic date of May 24, but if you have even a small but sunny patch of loamy yard, I’m here to tell you that you can still achieve stellar results this season with a minimum of fuss.

Since it’s June 3 and you’ve done nothing, I’m going to presume you’re lazy like me. And like me, you’re probably not rich, either. So what can you sow that yields produce of maximum value with limited tending?

Two words: mesclun lettuce. The blend of tender baby greens (mesclun being simply a word from Provence that means mixture) has become a gourmet staple at restaurants and produce aisles, yet many Calgarians seem unaware of how readily it grows here.

This is in stark contrast to, say, carrots, which can be finicky and, even if you get decent ones, it’s only at a time when delicious, gigantic Hutterite carrots are 49 cents a pound. Organic baby greens, you will notice, are always $10 a pound.

Planted in rows, they tend to choke out weeds, and can yield a dozen haircuts before they turn bitter. Cleverly, you’ll sow a new row every two weeks until the end of Stampede, to ensure youthful salads all summer long.

Other dead-easy crops to cultivate from seed include spinach, of course, plus sexy arugula and kale. (I recommend the lacinato variety, sometimes called dinosaur kale.) Also, mustard greens, Asian greens mixes and rapini, because the brassicas are superfoods. If you like broccoli, it’s too late for seeding, but buy some plants; frost-tolerant, I’ve had them yield continuously until Halloween.

Other long-season champs include green onions and rainbow Swiss chard, a close relative of beets. If you’re leery of those, I’d recommend golden beets – best served as babies, sauteed with their leaves in garlic, olive oil, white wine and balsamic vinegar. Lay that over freshly shorn mesclun with a sprinkling of feta cheese and you’ve got the wilted salad they want 20 bucks for downtown.

Consider a row or two of herbs with lots of parsley (both curly and Italian), cilantro and oregano. Start a perennial mint patch in preparation for many mojito seasons to come.

Meanwhile, learn how to use these ingredients in a chimichurri, the Argentine parsley salsa that will make you a hit at every barbecue you attend this year.

None of this is labour intensive. So why not let this be the year you discover that growing amazing food, even in tempestuous Calgary, is a lot easier than people make it look.

Kevin Brooker’s column appears

every second Monday

Article source: http://www.calgaryherald.com/opinion/columnists/Brooker+Gardening+tips+greenest+greenhorns/8469376/story.html