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Archives for May 17, 2013

Kimberling City tourism, development plan unveiled – Branson Tri

KIMBERLING CITY — A special meeting was held Wednesday night in Kimberling City for a presentation of the Kimberling City Tourism Development Program and the draft comprehensive plan by representatives and students from Missouri State University.

“There was a need for Kimberling City to establish a tourism identity for itself to encourage tourism for the area,” said Table Rock Lake Chamber of Commerce CEO Dave Liebenow. “That was one of the challenges they faced in the program, and I though they did a good job in their presentation.”

The project was tackled by two different classes at the university, each handling a different aspect.

“This was just a very quick overview of these suggested programs,” said director of the Center for Resource Planning and Management Diane May.

“There is much more information and details that we simply didn’t have time to go into tonight. We put in a lot of work on this.”

These students looked at everything from sewage and water treatment to potential activity centers and landscaping throughout the city.

“We’re not trying to recreate the wheel, or replace everything the town has,” May said. “The intent of the comprehensive plan is to provide you with a guide on how you can get to the vision you all want.”

While the comprehensive plan dealt with housing, public works, transportation, the possibility for a new water system and other city entities, much of the presentation was dedicated to the tourism plan.

“Our plan was to come up with some tourism development ideas,” said Geotourism Coordinator for Missouri State University Linnea Iantria.

“What we needed to do was establish a clear tourist identity. Kimberling City means something to you, but from a tourist perspective, there is no clear idea.”

Iantria the addressed the need for a new city logo. The current logo prominently features the Kimberling City Bridge.

“The bridge shows that you’re connecting one side of the lake to the other,” Iantria said.

“This logo is basically telling me to come on through and not really telling me to stop,” she said.

According to Iantria, business owners and residents of Kimberling City should embrace the tourist market in the area.

“Understand the financial benefit that tourism provides and understand your tourism assets and how best to capitalize on them,” Iantria said. “There are some great things going over here and I don’t think the town is taking advantage of them.”

The presentation included ways to add more events and attractions, a plan to market Kimberling City lodging to outside areas, several ideas to make the lake a larger part of the tourist draw, as well as plans for a potential yacht club.

“Some of this is pure fantasy, but you have to start somewhere,” Iantria said.

Many of the suggestions made in the presentation echoed a study done last year by several students from Drury University.

“There were a lot of common threads and suggestions there,” Liebenow said. “Those may be the things that get a good look.”

Iantria, and May both agree that the time for action is now.

“The city needs to control how tourism develops over time,” Iantria said. “Rather than the community being controlled by tourism outside the community vision.”

While these plans and ideas were shown to the public, there is no current timetable as to what, if anything, will come to fruition.

“We are still looking at the detailed recommendations and I will be working this more as well,” May said. “We’ll hopefully come out for the next planning commission meeting to go through things. There are things we just need more input on.”

Liebenow sees the information and suggestions as a good foundation for moving the city forward.

Article source: http://www.bransontrilakesnews.com/news_free/article_21b8c0e2-bf25-11e2-9753-001a4bcf887a.html

Alleged Hit-And-Run Driver Out on Bond; Victim’s Mom Hopes To Organize …

Almost a week after Riverhead resident Aaron Hartmann was critically injured by a hit-and-run driver, his condition was improving on Friday.

According to Linda Hartmann, Aaron’s mother, her son was in stable condition and underwent surgery on his leg Thursday evening. “The doctors told me yesterday that he’s very lucky,” Hartmann said. “They were able to save his leg.”

Concerns still exist, however, about how the leg will heal and whether her son’s body will reject the skin grafts.

As her son lies in a hospital bed, Hartmann, who has spent her nights in his hospital room, said she has questions about the accident — and about the amount of time between when her son was injured and when he received treatment. 

Hartmann said she is also concerned about mounting medical bills; she is unemployed and although her son has insurance, she is fearful there will be costs she is unable to pay.

To that end, Hartmann hopes a fundraiser of some kind might be organized and  said she is reaching out to the community for ideas or assistance.

The woman charged with fleeing from the scene of the crime, Calverton resident Jacqueline Celentano, 21, was released on $30,000 bond on Wednesday, according to police.

Southampton Town police said Celentano was located after detectives identified her as the driver and attempted to arrest her at her residence; she responded to headquarters with her lawyer a short time later and turned herself in, Southampton Town Detective Lisa Costa said.

Costa added that the car involved in the accident was located after police received a Crime Stoppers tip that the vehicle was red. “We combed the neighborhoods block by block in the vicinity of the hit and run location,” she said. “We located it at a friend’s house in Riverside off Flanders Road.”

Southampton Town Police detectives arrested Celentano on Tuesday for her alleged involvement in the hit-and-run accident that occurred on Sunday on County Road 105 in Flanders.

At 12:51 a.m. on Sunday, Aaron Hartman, 23, was walking home on County Road 105 when he was struck by a vehicle which left the scene, police said. He suffered serious physical injuries and was transported from Peconic Bay Medical Center to Stony Brook Hospital where he is still hospitalized. 

Detectives were able to identify the vehicle involved as a 2000 Chevy Impala. Celentano was charged with leaving the scene of an accident with physical injury, a felony.

After learning that Celentano was charged in the hit-and-run accident that left her son critically injured, Linda Hartmann said she was relieved by the news.

Linda Hartmann said the news brought relief. “I’m happy because it will lessen the stress of not knowing what happened,” she said. “I don’t feel hatred for the person,” she added. Hartmann said she did not know the condition of the driver who struck her son or the circumstances. “I feel sympathy for them, knowing they will now have to go through this, too.”

Hartmann added that the arrest did not change anything, though — her son was still badly injured.

Hartmann sustained injuries including broken bones in his leg, a contusion on his forehead, and fractures in his face; he has a shunt in his skull to relieve pressure from internal bleeding in his brain.

Hartmann said she spent Mother’s Day by her son’s side. The day was marked by tragedy: 19 years earlier, on the same day, her sister died. Of her son’s accident, she said, her voice breaking, “It’s terrible.”

Her son’s hospitalization is his third, Hartmann said; he was alo injured in the past when his jaw was broken in three places.

Hartmann, who has four other children, Danielle Stanchio, Michael Futerko, Jaason Hartmann, and Marcus Jackson, has remained by her son’s bedside, although he remains heavily sedated. She has spent time talking to him — and his aunt has called, to speak to him through the phone — with the belief that, despite his extensive injuries, he could still hear their voices. 

Hartmann’s anguished mother wants answers about what happened to her son on that dark night. “I’m upset. I’m angry. I want to understand what the circumstances were — why someone left him like that,” she said. “Whatever the case may be, they could have at least made a phone call.”

Hartmann, his mom said, was excited about his future, ready to start a new landscaping job on Wednesday and eagerly awaiting, with his girlfriend Emily, the birth of their baby girl, who will be named Natalie.

He was also involved with the Salvation Army and American Legion, she said.

“Now, he’s going to have to learn to walk again.” 

Article source: http://riverhead.patch.com/groups/police-and-fire/p/alleged-hitandrun-driver-out-on-bond-victims-mom--fundraiser

Little Argus

Today

Autism Support Group

An Autism Support Group will have its first meeting at 5 p.m. today (May 17) in the Edison Meeting Room, 406 N. Alameda St. Thoughts, ideas and issues you would like to discuss are welcome.

Driver’s Education

The NMSU Community Education Driver’s Education class will begin June 3. Registration: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. through today (May 17); 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday May 20-30 in room 1B.

Anniversary celebration

Home Care Connection Hospice, 513 S. Canal St., will have a 15 year anniversary celebration from 3-6 p.m. today (May 17) with free food, drinks and prizes.

Preschool Story Time

Preschool Story Time will be held at 9:30 a.m. today (May 17) at the Living Desert Zoo Gardens State Park Visitor Center. The story will be “Kitten’s First Full Moon.” A short walk in the park (weather permitting) and activity will follow. Children must be accompanied by an adult. This will be the last story time of the school year. Info: (575) 887-5516.

LMS out

Students of Loving Municipal Schools will not have school today (May 17) due to Sports Day. Classes will resume Monday.

Lions speaker

The Heights Lions Club will host Carlsbad building inspector Casy Cass on construction in the area when it meets at noon today (May 17) at Carlsbad Medical Center.

Youth rally

“We Need the Fire” youth rally will be held at 7 p.m. today (May 17) at New Beginnings Church of God, 234 S. Sixth St.,

with guest speaker Crystal Mullins, worship and fellowship.

Saturday

Dog dip

A fundraiser dog dip will be held from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Circle S Feed Store, 2907 S. Canal St.

Endangered Species Day

Endangered Species Day activities will be held beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday at Living Desert Zoo Gardens State Park. PowerPoint programs will be held in the Conference Room. 10 a.m. – Mexican Gray Wolves; 11 a.m. – Bolson Tortoises; 1 p.m. – Thick-billed Parrots. Crafts and face painting will be done from noon to 3 p.m. Info: (575) 887-5516.

Historical Society field trip

The SE New Mexico Historical Society will take a field trip at 10 a.m. Saturday to the Xcel Energy Solar Farm on Derrick Road. Info: (575) 887-2201.

Free items

There will be a free garage sale at 8 a.m. Saturday at Cavern Baptist Church, 108 Russell St. Info: (575) 887-2100.

Water-wise workshop

A workshop on water-wise landscaping will be held at 9 a.m. Saturday in the meeting room at the Eddy County Extension Office, 1304 W. Stevens St. Reservations: (575) 887-6595.

Swimming lessons

Swimming lesson signups will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Carlsbad High School Natatorium. Two three-week sessions will be held from 9-11 a.m. Session 1: June 3-14. Session 2: June 17-28. $20 per child. Info: (575) 234-3326.

VVA cook-out

Vietnam Veterans of America 998 will host a free cook-out at noon Saturday at Veterans Memorial Park.

Car wash fundraiser

The Carlsbad Down ‘N’ Dirty 14U softball team will have a fundraiser car wash from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Tate Branch parking lot, 1044 N. Canal St. Proceeds will go towards tournament entry fees for the upcoming season.

Short video showing

The short video “Sleeping Monsters, Sacred Fires: Volcanoes of New Mexico” will be shown at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Carlsbad Museum Art Center, 418 W. Fox St. Free admission. Info: (575) 887-0276.

VBS set building

Garden Street Baptist Church, 2806 Garden St., is having a VBS set building day from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. VBS volunteers are needed for first to second grade teacher and assistants in all areas. Any church wanting to partner or help with the sets is welcome to the materials after VBS is finished June 7. The theme is Lifeway Colossal Coaster.

Sunday

No events scheduled.

Announcements

LMS special meeting

Loving Municipal Schools Board of Education will have a special meeting at 4 p.m. Monday, May 20, in the LHS Board Room to take action on the superintendent position, contract and salary.

Meeting change

The Malaga MD Water Board will meet at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 22, at 8 Black River Village.

County offices closed

Eddy County offices will be closed Monday, May 27, in observance of Memorial Day. The sheriff’s office will be open and a road crew will be on call.

Art show entries

Entry and receiving for the Carlsbad Area Art Association Living Desert State park Art Show will be from 10 a.m. to noon Friday, June 21. Info: (575) 885-5404.

Paradise Chapel camp

Paradise Chapel will host Summer Day Camp from 9 a.m. to noon for ages 4 through sixth grade and 6:30-8:30 p.m. for seventh through 12th grade June 3-6 at 49 Paradise Ranch Road. Transportation leaves from the Mall parking lot at 8:40 a.m. Info: (575) 885-7786.

State fair artwork

Artwork by 35 Carlsbad Municipal Schools students will be exhibited Sept. 12-23 at the New Mexico State Fair School Arts Display in Albuquerque. An Arts Preview Night will be held from 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10.

Garden Street Baptist VBS

Garden Street Baptist Church, Vacation Bible School, 2806 Garden St., will hold Vacation Bible School from 8:30 a.m. to noon June 3-7.

Grief Share classes

Grief Share classes will be held at 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays at Lakeview Hospice, 1300 N. Canal St. Info: (575) 887-0933.

Toddler Time

Toddler Time summer sessions will be held at 11:30 a.m. Mondays from June 3-July 22 at Carlsbad Public Library, 101 S. Halagueno St.

Battered Families Shelter banquet

The third annual banquet to benefit the Carlsbad Battered Families Shelter will be held at 6 p.m. June 21 at the Leo Sweet Center, 1302 Mission. Tickets, $25, include dinner, presentation and live auction. Proceeds benefit the shelter. Tickets: (575) 885-4615. Donations for auction are also sought.

Comments sought

Comments are being sought to repair or replace the Carlsbad Caverns National Park potable water pipeline. To review project details and comment, go to http://parkplanning.nps.gov/, click on the pipeline project header and then click on Open for Comment. Written comments may be mailed or delivered in person by May 28 to: Superintendent, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, 3225 National Parks Hwy., Carlsbad, NM 88220.

Cub Scout camp

A Carlsbad – Chisum Trail District Cub Scout Twilight Summer Camp will be held from 5-8:30 p.m. July 15-19 at the Dowling Aquatic Base, 205 S. James St. Price break if paid by June 1. Info: (575) 302-4916 or (575) 706-4998.

Head Start enrollment

Southeast NM Community Action Corporation Head Start Program, 1915 San Jose Blvd., is accepting applications for the 2013-14 program year for children who have turned 3 or 4 before Sept. 1, 2013. Those who turn 5 before Sept. 1 are not eligible. Bring birth certificate, current immunization record, income verification for past year, Social Security card if available and Medicaid or health insurance card if available. Info: (575) 887-3939.

St. Edward enrolling

St. Edward School is now enrolling students age 4 through fifth grade for the 2013-14 school year. Info: 805 Walter St. or (575) 885-4620.

NMSU summer hours

NMSU Carlsbad will change to summer hours, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, May 20 through Aug. 2.

Warrant amnesty

Municipal Court is offering amnesty to anyone with an outstanding warrant for unpaid fines through May 28. The warrant will be dismissed if the fine and fees are paid in full at the court. To find out if you have a warrant, call (5775) 885-3363 or 9575) 885-4711.

LMS quorum

There will be a quorum of the Loving Municipal Schools Board of Education at 8 a.m. Monday, May 20, to interview superintendent candidates.

LMS budget review

The Loving Municipal Schools Board of Education will meet at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 21, in the LHS Board Room to present and publicly review the tentative budget for the 2013-14 fiscal year. Agendas available in Central Office.

Public pool

The ENMU Roswell swimming pool will open to the public Saturday, May 25. It will be open from 1-5:30 p.m. daily with $3 admission.

Memorial Day flags

Veterans will be honored Memorial Day with flags placed on graves May 27. Help is needed to place flags beginning at 6 a.m. at the Carlsbad Cemetery gate on Juarez Street. Personal flags should be marked to avoid them being taken at the end of the day. Info: (575) 302-3261.

Warrant sweeps

The Carlsbad Police Department will be doing warrant sweeps after May 28, especially during business hours at places of business.

ENMU-R orientations

Easter New Mexico University Roswell will hold new student orientations from 1-5 p.m. June 19 (register by June 12); 1-5 p.m. July 10 (register by July 3); and 8 a.m. to noon Aug. 7 (register by July 31) in the Instructional Technology Center. Bring placement test scores; picture ID and vehicle registration. Registration: www.roswell.enmu.edu. Info: (575) 624-7405.

Mariachi concert

Mariachi Unido will perform a free concert at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, at Living Desert Zoo Gardens State Park. Info: (575) 887-5516.

Farmers’ Market meeting

A Carlsbad Downtown Farmers’ Market vendor meeting will be held at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, in room 106 at NMSU Carlsbad. Those interested in participating in the 2013 season should attend. Info: (575) 689-9003 or (575) 628-3768.

Farmers’ Market opening

Carlsbad Downtown Farmers’ Market will be open from 8-11 a.m. Saturday, May 25, on the Eddy County Courthouse lawn. Jim Goff will provide live music. Info: (575) 689-9003 or (575) 628-3768.

First Baptist VBS

First Baptist Church, 112 N. Alameda St., will host Vacation Bible School from 8:30 a.m. to noon June 17-21 for children in kindergarten through fifth grade (completed).

Convenience Station hours

The City of Carlsbad Solid Waste Department Convenience Station, 302 E. Plaza St., will be open from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday until Nov. 4. Residential waste is accepted. Info: (575) 885-0042.

Walk Carlsbad

A walking group will meet just before 11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the beach parking lot and walk for 30-45 minutes. Bring a bottle of water and wear good walking shoes. Info: (575) 887-6595.

Location change

C-PAWS will meet at 6 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Carlsbad Police Department, 602 W. Mermod St., during June, July and August.

Class of ’83

The Carlsbad High School class of 1983 will have its 30 year reunion July 5. Info/register: (575) 361-4036, richang@windstream.net or http://www.facebook.com/angelarichard.najera.

Patient Navigator meeting

Meetings to help improve cancer services in Carlsbad will be held at 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday, May 20, at the Carlsbad Public Library annex, 101 S. Halagueno St. Cancer survivors are asked to share their experiences. Info/register: (575) 885-3500, www.listentoyourmom.org.

Honor Guard

The Carlsbad Veterans Honor Guard is looking for veterans to join. Any person can be accepted for membership that can produce a discharge document and has been honorably discharged from any branch of the U.S. military. Those interested can submit a letter of intent to P.O. Box 605 Carlsbad, NM 88220. Info: (575) 706-1320, (575) 451-6244 or (575) 725-8494.

Bookmobile visits

The Rural Bookmobile East will be at the Queen Fire Station from 10-11 a.m.; Loving Casa De La Flor Apartments from 1:15-2:45 p.m.; and Lakewood SKP Ranch from 4-5 p.m. June 5. Info: (575) 461-1206, rbme@state.nm.us or www.nmstatelibrary.org.

RPENM speaker

The Retired Public Employees of New Mexico Chapter 10 will host speaker Janell Whitlock, city councilmember, when it meets at 2 p.m. Tuesday, May 21, in the parlor on the Halagueno side of First Presbyterian Church, 309 W. Shaw St. The next meeting will be Sept. 17.

Driver safety class

An AARP Driver’s Safety Class will be held from 8 a.m. to noon Friday, May 31, at North Mesa Senior Center, 1112 N. Mesa St. Info/registration: (575) 885-9411.

Kindergarten registration

Kindergarten registration for 2013-14 is ongoing through May 30 at the Early Childhood Education Center, 1801 W. Lea St., for any child turning 5 before Sept. 1. Bring state birth certificate, Social Security card, shot record and proof of address. Info: (575) 234-3303.

Donations sought

Carlsbad Public Library is seeking donations of LEGO bricks to start a LEGO club this summer. Donations can be dropped off at the front desk at the library, 101 S. Halagueno St. No other types of toy are being requested at this time.

Worship team members needed

Garden Street Baptist Church, 2806 Garden St., is looking for lead and bass guitarists, keyboardist, singers, sound techs, etc., for a worship team. Practice will be held from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Saturdays.

Grant applications

Applications for the Community Impact Education Grant, which addresses the low proficiency in math, reading and/or science of elementary grade students, are available from United Way of Carlsbad South Eddy County at (575) 887-3504 or info@unitedwayofcarlsbad.org. Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday, May 31.

Ducky Affair tickets

Tickets for the Assistance League of Carlsbad’s 24th annual Ducky Affair are available. They are $5 and are available at Candlewood, Danny’s Place, La Tienda, Southwest Pharmacy, Shade Tree, Western Commerce Bank south branch and from any ALC member. 3,000 will be sold. Proceeds fund Operation School Bell and other programs.

Articles for veterans

Marine Corps League No. 678 will make a trip Aug. 10 to ToC’s Veteran’s Hospital to deliver needed articles to veterans. Items needed include toiletries, clean used clothing, books, etc. Info: (575) 457-2058 or (575) 302-2204.

AARP speaker

AARP Carlsbad Chapter 651 will host speaker Charly Kerby, of the CWS Law Firm, on asbestos exposure and the compensation and benefits available for those exposed, at 3 p.m. Monday, May 20, at North Mesa Senior Center, 1112 N. Mesa St.

Article source: http://www.currentargus.com/ci_23266522/little-argus

Needham Home of the Week: 226 May St.

The 1925 English style brick and shingle front Colonial at 226 May St. in Needham has not been on the market for 40 years. Nestled on a knoll, set high off the street, you probably wouldn’t even know a house was there unless you were really looking.

Dense foliage, perennial gardens and beautifully landscaped grounds conceal this gem of a home, which is absolutely pristine.

The house is beautiful, and its location is ideal – a stone’s throw from Needham Center.

Linda Shaughnessy of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage has listed this 2,370-square-foot home with three bedrooms and one-and-a-half baths at $749,000. She describes the home as “love at first glance.”

Lush gardens and a covered brick landing welcome you to the classic front door. As you enter the foyer a warm ambiance envelops you.

Gumwood moldings with their original luster grace the foyer and are prevalent throughout the home. Gumwood was popular with Craftsman-style homes in the 1920s. A coat closet is on the right of the foyer as well as a beautiful, wide set of stairs leading to the second floor. 

To the left of the foyer is a front-to-back living room with a wood-burning fireplace and built-in bookshelves. A wide bay window in front lets the sunshine pour in. French doors at the back of the room lead out to a ceramic-tiled family room.

A wall of windows makes this a sun-filled room overlooking the backyard. The heated room can be enjoyed year round and has recessed lighting.

The back part of the room is a cozy space that highlights a wall of exposed brick from the exterior of the house before this addition. A closet provides storage.

Spring and summer evenings invite you to the screened-in porch off the family room. Outside, the beautiful landscaped yard beckons, and a brick patio is perfect for barbeques and entertaining. The yard abuts conservation land, allowing for total privacy in the backyard.

The gracious dining room off the living room has a built-in china cabinet and more hardwood floors. A small adjacent room could be used for dining storage or perhaps a compact office. A tiled half bath is off this room and could easily be expanded. 

A cheerful kitchen off the dining room has white cabinetry, complementing light-colored granite countertops and a subway tile backsplash. The fir wood flooring stands out and contrasts beautifully. Blending new with the old, an original table with bench seats is built into an alcove. 

A mudroom off the kitchen also serves as a pantry with shelving, and an exterior door leads to the side and back yards. 

Heading up the stairs you will find a delightful gumwood library nook landing that includes built-in bookshelves and an inviting cape seat that opens for storage. Throughout the house every door features original glass doorknobs. 

Three bedrooms on the second floor all have hardwood floors. The master bedroom is a good-sized 20- by 13-foot room with two closets. A second bedroom has a large window with views of the private backyard. The three bedrooms share a full bath with a tub/shower combination, and a linen closet is outside the bath. 

The basement is unfinished but has a high ceiling and could be wonderful space if someone wanted to finish it and expand the home. Currently, it provides plenty of room for storage and is used as the laundry room. The home is heated by oil and has two zones. 

For more information about this home, contact Linda Shaughnessy of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage at 617-429-2488 (cell) or 781-237-9090 ext. 326 (office) or linda.shaughnessy@nemoves.com.

 

Editor’s note: The property has gone under agreement.

Article source: http://www.wickedlocal.com/needham/news/x1910058158/Needham-Home-of-the-Week-226-May-St

Garden hermit needed. Apply within.

If you’re a gardener, this time of year likely has you thinking about the backyard. Your plans might include moving the flower beds or restocking the fish pond. They do not, most likely, involve hiring a live hermit.

Had you been a wealthy landowner in 18th-century England, however, things might have been different. For several decades beginning at the middle of the century, live hermits were the height of fashion for the British gentry. New trends in garden design—away from formal, geometric grounds and towards artificial Edens—created a new kind of cultural habitat, which some people filled with an actual occupant. Provided with a hut or grotto to call his own and a few simple meals a day, a garden hermit might live for years on a picturesque corner of the property. Wandering guests would marvel at this living, breathing symbol of rural withdrawal.

Though today it sounds bizarre—indeed, indecent—to use a live person as a garden ornament, the practice had deep roots. The tradition extended all the way back to the Roman Empire, when the emperor Hadrian built himself a miniature villa on a tiny island near his palace to be used for solitary escapes. In his new book, “The Hermit in the Garden: From Imperial Rome to Garden Gnome,” Gordon Campbell, a professor of renaissance studies at the University of Leicester, traces the history and lasting influence of perhaps the strangest trend in the history of landscaping.

Hermits, and the hermitages in which they lodged, were chiefly a feature of the more lavish gardens of Georgian England, but there is also evidence of the phenomenon extending to Ireland, Scotland, and, less frequently, continental Europe. The hermit, Campbell argues in his book, was a public symbol of an emotion that we have since learned to bury: melancholy. Sadness was something one cultivated, a state that suggested emotional sensitivity and a kind of native intelligence. To employ a garden hermit—cloaked in rags, performing solitude—was to assert a fine sensibility, one keen to the spiritual benefits of privacy, peace, and mild woe.

“The Hermit in the Garden”

Hermitage at Taymouth Castle in Scotland.

With today’s public mood tilted toward positive thinking rather than melancholy solitude, we are no longer so eager to savor our sadness or put it on display. (Also, of course, most contemporary gardeners are ordinary people rather than landed gentry desperate for diversion.) But subtle relics of this peculiar chapter of landscape architecture do live on in our gardens today: They take the form of hidden benches positioned for intimate conversation, small gazebos perfect for pursuing solitary hobbies, even—most literally—garden gnomes.

Campbell spoke with Ideas from Leicester, where he lives and teaches. This interview was edited from multiple conversations.

IDEAS: How did all this happen? How would one even get a hermit?

CAMPBELL: Landowners advertised, and under oddly similar conditions—they feel like they come from fairy tales. The term is often seven years, the hermits are not allowed to wash their hair or cut their nails, which sounds horrendous. They had to live austerely, and when their term was up, they’d receive 4 or 5 or 600 pounds, enough to never work again. Landowners had enormous power. They could also say to one of their tenants, “I want you to be my ornamental hermit. Here is your druid costume.”

IDEAS: Was it a good life?

Geoff Wilson

Author Gordon Campbell

CAMPBELL: There are a few hermits that appear to have had small cottages, but only in summertime. There was one who lived in a cave; he had a bell that he could ring for cave service. A pot of tea or something would be brought, though he couldn’t talk to the servants. There’s no suggestion of cruelty—besides the fact of being basically owned, of course.

IDEAS: The hermits’ dwellings were also used as sites for parties and lively human interaction. Can you talk a little bit about this contradiction?

CAMPBELL: Is solitude an ideal to be achieved or a sign of failure in society?…The hermit comes down bizarrely on both sides….It’s quite striking how often the hermitages are used for family picnics, say. There’s one example I quote in the book of a hermitage in Ireland that has a hatch in it and the hermit becomes the bartender, he serves wine.

IDEAS: Did you encounter any American hermitages in your research?

CAMPBELL: Andrew Jackson’s place is really the only one I can think of that relates to this history. He wasn’t wealthy by origin; he bought the estate on which he grew up and called it his hermitage.

IDEAS: You write that the hermit is “an embodiment of the ideals of solitary retirement and pleasing melancholy.” How are these virtues expressed now?

CAMPBELL: There’s a poem by Dorothy Frances Gurney, [“God’s Garden”]: “One is nearer God’s heart in a garden/ Than anywhere else on earth.” Everyone’s grandmother has that engraved on a plaque in their garden. The idea of the garden as a place of contemplation, the garden as a therapeutic place to go and work or sit, or whatever you do—that is a relic of what we’re talking about. It’s a place to go think….And we still put buildings in our gardens. I don’t know about America, but England has the garden shed—the man hole of the garden—the place where the man goes and makes things in a manly kind of way. And women from Edith Wharton onwards take tea in the garden. So that sense of respite lives onwards.

“The Hermit in the Garden”

Hermitage at Foremark in England.

IDEAS: But there’s no longer such literal symbolism.

CAMPBELL: Back then, the notion of melancholy wasn’t a medical condition, like depression. It was a sign of depth of character….So in that sense, we no longer put symbols of our sadness, as it were, in our gardens.

IDEAS: Have you been following the case of the “Maine hermit”? He’s not so much a melancholy figure; he’s more of a menace—stealing bacon from campgrounds.

CAMPBELL: There are some hermits I left beside when writing my book. After World War I, for instance, there were soldiers who returned to England and suffered from what we would now call shell shock [or post-traumatic stress disorder] and regard as a medical condition. They found themselves entirely unable to reintegrate themselves into civilian life and ended up living in the woods, unable to talk to anyone. They were regarded not as sinister at all; they were regarded as damaged in some way….They lived in suburban woodlands for years and years.

IDEAS: The hermit seems to have taken on different connotations over the last, say, 100 years.

CAMPBELL: We have developed, in our society, a mistrust in this sort of person. The hobo, for example, was a kind of friendly folk figure, but we now teach our children to beware of strangers, especially ones who are “alternative” and live in the woods….We have a much darker image of people who retire from the world. We don’t regard them as lovable eccentrics anymore.

Article source: http://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2013/05/18/garden-hermit-needed-apply-within/0DKsVYhtCSgVEwHtzF7u3L/story.html

Preview Clayton Historical Society’s annual gardens tour

Posted May 17, 2013

By

This year six gardens representing various gardening and landscaping styles are represented at the Clayton Historical Society’s 21st annual Clayton Gardens Tour. The tour will take place May 18-19.

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  • Showy columbine can be found in the front yard of the home of Frank and Georgianne Champion in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. The Champion's yard is one that will be featured in the Clayton Historical Society's 21st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour this month. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    Showy columbine can be found in the front yard of the home of Frank and Georgianne Champion in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. The Champion’s yard is one that will be featured in the Clayton Historical Society’s 21st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour this month. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • On her hillside garden, Georgianne Champion trims a carpet rose bush in her Concord, Calif., backyard on Wednesday May 6, 2013 in preparation for the gardens tour.  Most of the plants on the French country garden hillside are planted in baskets to protect against gophers.  (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    On her hillside garden, Georgianne Champion trims a carpet rose bush in her Concord, Calif., backyard on Wednesday May 6, 2013 in preparation for the gardens tour. Most of the plants on the French country garden hillside are planted in baskets to protect against gophers. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • Diane Carbine of Clayton, waters her backyard vegetable garden in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. Carbine's yard will be part of The Clayton Historical Society's 21st annual Clayton Gardens Tour on May 18-19. This year six gardens representing various gardening and landscaping styles are represented. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)

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    Diane Carbine of Clayton, waters her backyard vegetable garden in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. Carbine’s yard will be part of The Clayton Historical Society’s 21st annual Clayton Gardens Tour on May 18-19. This year six gardens representing various gardening and landscaping styles are represented. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)


  • A variety of color can be found in the front yard garden of Frank and Georgianne Champion's yard in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    A variety of color can be found in the front yard garden of Frank and Georgianne Champion’s yard in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • Showy red hot poker plants grab the attention of a hummingbird in the backyard garden of Georgianne Champion in  Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013.   (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    Showy red hot poker plants grab the attention of a hummingbird in the backyard garden of Georgianne Champion in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • The front side yard is landscaped at the home of Frank and Georgianne Champion on their Concord, Calif., property that meets their neighbors where they have created a gathering spot on Wednesday May 6, 2013. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    The front side yard is landscaped at the home of Frank and Georgianne Champion on their Concord, Calif., property that meets their neighbors where they have created a gathering spot on Wednesday May 6, 2013. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • Succulents bloom in the backyard of Georgianne Champion's garden in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    Succulents bloom in the backyard of Georgianne Champion’s garden in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • A quiet sitting area is seen in a corner of the beautiful backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group))

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    A quiet sitting area is seen in a corner of the beautiful backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group))


  • Glass plate art work blooms with other vegetation in the backyard of Georgianne Champion in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. Her home will be one featured in the Clayton Historical Society's 21st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    Glass plate art work blooms with other vegetation in the backyard of Georgianne Champion in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. Her home will be one featured in the Clayton Historical Society’s 21st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • On her hillside garden, Georgianne Champion trims plants in her Concord, Calif., backyard on Wednesday May 6, 2013 in preparation for the Clayton Historical Society's 21'st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour. Champion and her neighbors installed a rattle snake fence to keep the snakes from neighboring open space from coming into their gardens.  A gas burning fire in the lower portion of the yard makes the flagstone patio area warm and inviting. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    On her hillside garden, Georgianne Champion trims plants in her Concord, Calif., backyard on Wednesday May 6, 2013 in preparation for the Clayton Historical Society’s 21’st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour. Champion and her neighbors installed a rattle snake fence to keep the snakes from neighboring open space from coming into their gardens. A gas burning fire in the lower portion of the yard makes the flagstone patio area warm and inviting. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • A dwarf bird of paradise is photographed with a new bloom in the backyard of Georgianne Champion in  Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    A dwarf bird of paradise is photographed with a new bloom in the backyard of Georgianne Champion in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • A group of chickens roam the backyard of Diane Carbine's home in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013.  (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)

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    A group of chickens roam the backyard of Diane Carbine’s home in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)


  • On her hillside garden, Georgianne Champion searches for the perfect spot for a glass art piece with a neon light in her Concord, Calif., backyard on Wednesday May 6, 2013 in preparation for the Clayton Historical Society's 21'st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour.  (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    On her hillside garden, Georgianne Champion searches for the perfect spot for a glass art piece with a neon light in her Concord, Calif., backyard on Wednesday May 6, 2013 in preparation for the Clayton Historical Society’s 21’st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • A rocking chair over looks Marsh Creek as part of the backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. Carbine's yard will be part of The Clayton Historical Society's 21st annual Clayton Gardens Tour on May 18-19. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)

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    A rocking chair over looks Marsh Creek as part of the backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. Carbine’s yard will be part of The Clayton Historical Society’s 21st annual Clayton Gardens Tour on May 18-19. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)


  • Layers of colors can be found in Georgianne Champion's French country backyard  garden in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. Champion's garden is one that will be featured on May 18th 19th in the Clayton Historical Society's 21st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour.(Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

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    Layers of colors can be found in Georgianne Champion’s French country backyard garden in Concord, Calif., on Wednesday May 6, 2013. Champion’s garden is one that will be featured on May 18th 19th in the Clayton Historical Society’s 21st Annual Clayton Gardens Tour.(Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)


  • Diane Carbine's front yard is photographed in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. This year six gardens representing various gardening and landscaping styles are represented. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)

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    Diane Carbine’s front yard is photographed in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. This year six gardens representing various gardening and landscaping styles are represented. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)


  • A deck leads to a swimming pool and spa in the backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013.  (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)

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    A deck leads to a swimming pool and spa in the backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)


  • A swimming pool and spa are seen in the backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. Carbine's yard will be part of The Clayton Historical Society's 21st annual Clayton Gardens Tour on May 18-19. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)

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    A swimming pool and spa are seen in the backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. Carbine’s yard will be part of The Clayton Historical Society’s 21st annual Clayton Gardens Tour on May 18-19. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)


  • A cactus garden sits inside of a sink in the barbecue area of the backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)

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    A cactus garden sits inside of a sink in the barbecue area of the backyard of Diane Carbine in Clayton, Calif., on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group)



Article source: http://photos.mercurynews.com/2013/05/17/preview-clayton-historical-societys-annual-gardens-tour/

Gardening Tips: Make the pledge to spend 10 percent on NC grown food


Posted: Friday, May 17, 2013 11:29 am


Gardening Tips: Make the pledge to spend 10 percent on NC grown food

By Matthew Stevens

RR Daily Herald

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The North Carolina Center for Environmental Farming Systems and the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service have partnered to initiate the 10% Campaign. The 10% Campaign is a program dedicated to encouraging residents of North Carolina to pledge to spend 10 percent of their food bill on North Carolina grown food. As a state, we spend about $35 billion on food each year. If 10 percent of that goes to North Carolina producers, that’s a return of $3.5 million to our local economy. This will strengthen our local food economy, support farms and food processing facilities, and create jobs across the state. As consumers, increasing the amount of fresh fruits and vegetables in our diet can significantly reduce diet-related diseases and long-term health care expenses for everyone.

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Friday, May 17, 2013 11:29 am.

Article source: http://www.rrdailyherald.com/opinion/columns/gardening-tips-make-the-pledge-to-spend-percent-on-nc/article_8ab36030-bf06-11e2-b5a0-0019bb2963f4.html

Water-wise gardening tips from the 9News Kitchen Garden

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KUSA – Warmer days and especially warming soil conditions make this a prime weekend for planting warm season vegetables.

Because of the drought, we are using a new planting technique this year in the 9News Kitchen Garden called the “waffle garden.” Instead of planting veggies in long rows, plant seeds and starter plants of the same kind within squares that are dug out to be slightly lower than the rest of the garden.

Within each square, lower the soil about 1-2 inches and then rim the edge of the square with a mound of soil about 3-4 inches high. This technique essentially creates a square saucer that holds water and prevents run-off after watering.

This technique also makes plants slightly denser than row planting. This tighter form of planting shades the soil more than row planting which helps hold in moisture. The shade also deters weeds.

Other tips for a water-wise edible garden:
• After planting, apply mulch around the bases of plants. Bark or even grass clippings from mowing the lawn are good mulches.
• Use drip irrigation. It is the most efficient method of watering all plants other than lawns. It is also gardener friendly because you can simply schedule automatic watering via the irrigation system’s timer.

What to plant
Once the danger of frost has past, get warm season crops in the ground. This year, de-emphasize the more ornamental plants, like pumpkins, and plant more serious edibles such as:
• Tomatoes
• Tomatillos
• Peppers
• Squash varieties
• Brussels sprouts
• Beans and peas
• Rhubarb
• Berries, such as raspberries and strawberries

Growing edibles is a sustainable use of resources when we use water wisely in the process.

Information courtesy Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado – sponsors of the 9News Water Wise Garden and the 9News Kitchen Garden. www.alcc.com

(KUSA-TV © 2013 Multimedia Holdings Corporation)

Article source: http://www.9news.com/news/local/article/336705/222/Water-wise-gardening-tips-from-the-9News-Kitchen-Garden

Gardening tips from the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum

KARE 11

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GOLDEN VALLEY, Minn. — The late spring shouldn’t have a huge impact on home gardeners, according to Barb DeGroot of the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum.

DeGroot says the Arboretum’s experts say the best indicator of when to plant is soil temperature.  Different plants require different temperatures for optimum growth, so you may want to invest in a good soil thermometer.

The Minnesota Landscape Arboretum offers a variety of classes for beginning and expert gardeners.  Saturday and Sunday May 18th-19th the Arboretum will feature the annual Auxiliary Spring Plant Sale from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

For those who just want to view the plants, DeGroot says the tulips are out and gorgeous.

(Copyright 2013 by KARE. All rights reserved.)

Article source: http://www.kare11.com/news/article/1026158/16/Gardening-tips-from-the-Minnesota-Landscape-Arboretum

Gardening with Tim: Tips and reminders

SEATTLE — Sometimes starting something new can be a challenge because it can be a bit of a dilemma where to begin — and gardening is no exception. And the science behind growing plants can be as complicated or as simple as you’d like it to be, so don’t let it get you down or intimidate you. I often tell people that the Master Gardener training classes I took through Oregon State University taught me how little I really know about horticulture.

The basic purpose of a garden is to enrich your personal environment, and hopefully enrich our overall environment at the same time. Gardening can take place nearly anywhere with the basic ingredients, whether you have a tiny patio, small or large backyard, a single window sill or acres of property.

Now, how you define a garden might be the best place to begin for beginners. Whatever you’re looking for, from tasty flavors and healthy veggies to tons of sweet smelling blossoms or even protection from elements like wind, sun and rain, make sure to determine what you want the end result to be.

“Just take a deep breath,” Allen Larsen said.

Larsen runs the Fred Meyer in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood. The avid gardener said they field lots of questions from gardeners just digging into the hobby. He encourages beginners to not be afraid to ask questions.

“Come out here and figure out what captures your attention and captures your imagination,” he said. “Is it going to be a flower garden or a veggie garden? Or is it going to be a hybrid garden?”

Larsen and I agree that starting small is your best bet for the truly novice gardener. In my experience, overwhelming yourself with too many plants or too big a space can lead to frustration. Small successes generate confidence to tackle bigger and more ambitious projects down the road. And when it comes to tools, you don’t need to spend a ton of money either.

“You don’t need a whole shed full of tools,” Larsen said. “There’s so many simple tools that can be multipurpose. [The basics are a] hand spade and a hand rake. You can do that with a pretty limited budget.”

Plants do have basic needs that you need to remember to pay attention to, such as water, sunlight and good soil. Reading labels on plants will tell you how much of each a particular plant needs. Make sure you read labels on fertilizers and pesticides carefully — and use both sparingly. You can hurt your plants and the environment with too much of either.

Surrounding plants once they’re in the ground with mulch — or in some cases wood chips — has several benefits. They hold in soil moisture which saves you on water and inhibit weeds from popping up which saves you frustration and time yanking out unwanted invaders. And decomposing compost and/or wood chips provides soil nutrients as the season progresses, so in the long run you might not have to worry about fertilizers if your soil is enhanced naturally. Ultimately, it’s a nice shortcut to a cleaner end result and look.

euphorbia

Euphorbia plant. Image courtesy of wikipedia

It was the names of plants that always made me the most nervous and frustrated. I really loved one of the tips that I got from one of my Master Gardener instructors. She said that if you make up nicknames for the plants in your yard — you’ll remember them. Down the road the more you garden, when you eventually need to look something up on a particular plant you’ll find out what they’re really called and then the actual name will stick in your head.

One example was the plant in my side yard at my old house in Portland that I called the “Alien Spaceship Plant” because that’s what it looked like to me. Down the road I found out that it was actually in a family of plants called ”euphorbia,” and the name stuck. (Full disclosure — I had to look up how to spell “euphorbia.”)

And while you might think you’ll make mistakes from time to time,  don’t worry — we all do. Seasoned gardeners just call them “learning experiences.” Happy gardening!

Article source: http://q13fox.com/2013/05/16/gardening-with-tim-tips-and-reminders/