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Archives for May 3, 2013

Dress up your backyard with art – WOOD 8 – WOOD

CALEDONIA, Mich. (WOOD) – Spring got off to a late start this year and now that the warm weather is in full swing, it’s important to have your backyard in tip top shape. The new trend in landscaping, isn’t just plants and shrubbery, but to create an inviting outdoor living space. A way to achieve this feeling is by incorporating outdoor art.

While Harder and Warner Landscaping in Caledonia is known for their variety of shrubs and plants, they also have a large selection of art. Something new to their store are outdoor canvases. These canvases withstand fading for up to five years, winds up to 60 miles per hour and give your outdoor space a designer feel.

If you’re looking for new ideas to spruce up your backyard, simply bring in pictures of your space to Harder and Warner Landscaping and their experts will walk you through the design process. Customers can be as hands-on or as hands-off as they want to and Harder and Warner experts will step in to help.

Harder and Warner Landscaping is located at 6464 Broadmoor SE in Caledonia. For more information call 616-698-6910 or visit www.harderandwarner.com.

 

Article source: http://www.woodtv.com/dpp/eightwest/dress-up-your-backyard-with-art

Time capsule idea for Walton Bridge opening

A TIME capsule buried at the site of the new Walton Bridge is one of the suggestions for its grand opening this summer.

According to the team working on the bridge, due to open in July, a ceremony will be held and will possibly include the burial of a capsule containing items showing what life was like in 2013 – not to be opened until 500 years has passed. Other ideas included a plaque at the site.

The comments were made at a Walton Bridge meeting organised by the Elmbridge Seniors group and chaired by Sir Ivan Lawrence QC.

Keith Scott, Surrey Highways planned maintenance manager and Walton Bridge project manager, said the county council was looking for ideas on what to do at the opening later this year.

Traffic should be using the bridge by the end of July, with works such as landscaping the area continuing into the second half of the year.

Updating the meeting on the progress of the bridge, Mr Scott said anticipation would be like the Olympic road races – apathy before the event but when it started people were more interested.

He said they wanted to promote the bridge and surroundings as a “leisure area” showing off what Walton and Shepperton “has to offer”.

Concerns were raised with Mr Scott about different aspects of the scheme, including traffic leading up to the bridge on both sides of the crossing.

One of the questions asked was about the possibility of changing the traffic lights sequence on the Walton side, to try to stop congestion on the Shepperton side of the bridge.

He said no changes had been made but the design team would be looking at improving traffic safety.

A lot of discussion took place over the difficulty of a right turn into Cowey Sale, and the traffic problems it currently causes.

Mr Scott said: “This, along with the traffic improvements, is being looked at by our design team and any changes will go through the democratic process.”

He added there was due to be an area for five cars queuing to turn right on the new bridge, therefore keeping them out of the main carriageway.

Mole Kenny, a member of Elmbridge Seniors, said a “few small changes” would be needed to help traffic flow in the area, including making a ‘no right turn’ at Cowey Sale.

“All traffic issues could easily be, and should be, addressed by Surrey County Council experts to improve the new Walton Bridge for cars,” he said.

Mr Scott added there was an opportunity for more cost savings on the £32m project, and said they had already managed to save around £500,000.

Article source: http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/s/2133424_time_capsule_idea_for_walton_bridge_opening

Guest Post: Green Landscaping Ideas – Green Building Elements

It is enjoyable hearing from someone who understands both sides of he building trade. Wade Myer writes that he is a recovering contractor who has turned to writing as it is much easier on his back. He adds that he has always been drawn to the written word where he can frame sentences rather than walls. Here he provides a quick and common sense perspective concerning the landscaping side of the green building challenge.

Drought-tolerant woolly silver thyme, golden sedum, and miniature blue bellflowers are perennial low creeping groundcovers blooming together along a garden pathway. Source: Shutterstock

Drought-tolerant woolly silver thyme, golden sedum, and miniature blue bellflowers are perennial low creeping groundcovers blooming together along a garden pathway. Source: Shutterstock

Green Landscaping Ideas

As more and more people are realizing the significance of their impacts on the environment, we are seeing a rapid growth of the “green” movement. As the movement has grown it has also expanded into numerous aspects of our lives. One area where people have become especially conscious of their environmental impact is in regards to their home. For those who want to make their homes more eco-friendly, an easy place to start is outside. Here are some green landscaping ideas and techniques you can implement to make your house more environmentally friendly and energy efficient.

Use Native Plants

The first thing you should consider when thinking about green landscaping is whether or not you have native plants in your garden or yard. Planting only native plants is green in a variety of ways. Native plants are accustomed to the region you are living in and will require much less care and water.

Utilizing Shade from Trees

Another green landscaping idea deals with the shade produced by the trees in your yards. Strategically placing trees so that they shade your house can save on energy. The shade from these trees protects your home from direct sunlight which keeps your house cool and reduces the stress put on your air conditioner during summer months.

Xeriscaping

This is a relatively new term and idea that deals with clever irrigation practices. As mentioned before, using native plants will help with this technique as it saves on water. Aspects of xeriscaping include utilizing low-flow nozzles and soil moisture sensors along with smart controllers which determine how to use water most efficiently. To go a step further, you can direct any rain spouts or gutter spouts are directing rain water to your garden or lawn.

Create an Edible Garden

This is perhaps one of the most eco-friendly things you can do in regards to green landscaping as its environmental impacts go beyond just your garden. Keeping the idea of native plants in mind, you can make your garden not only beautiful, but also functional by planting edible vegetation. Eating food that you grow in your own garden will provide you with healthy organic food and reduce your carbon footprint at the same time.

These are just a few of the techniques available for green landscaping practices. Ensuring that your garden and the landscape of your house are eco-friendly is a good starting point to making your house more environmentally friendly. The green movement will only continue to grow, and as it does, everyone will benefit.

Wade Myer is a recovering contractor who has turned to writing as it is much easier on his back. He has always been drawn to the written word where he can frame sentences rather than walls.  Currently he writes on behalf of Crown Point home builders Steiner Homes LTD.

Photo: Drought-tolerant woolly silver thyme, golden sedum, and miniature blue bellflowers are perennial low creeping groundcovers blooming together along a garden pathway from Shutterstock.

Article source: http://greenbuildingelements.com/2013/05/02/guest-post-green-landscaping-ideas/

Grover seeks gardens for annual tour

Grover seeks gardens for annual tour

The most beautiful, unusual or water-conserving gardens in Grover Beach are being sought for the 2012 Spring Garden Tour and Plant Exchange.

The free, self-guided tours of the city’s best gardens is set for 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 2, by the Grover Beach Parks, Recreation and Beautification Commission.

Five to six gardens within the city limits will be selected for the showcase designed to germinate landscaping ideas for visitors’ own yards.

Grover Beach residents who would like their gardens featured on this year’s tour and people who would like to nominate someone else’s garden should contact the Grover Beach Parks and Recreation Department at 473-4580 by Friday, May 10.

Members of the Recreation and Beautification Commission will conduct a preview tour of all the nominated gardens and select the ones to be included.

Those whose gardens are chosen can “sit back and relax” while commission members show off their gardens.

Garden visitors can take part in the Plant Exchange by bringing a plant or cutting and trading it for a new plant to add to their gardens.

A master gardener also will be available at the Plant Exchange to answer gardening questions.

Posted Friday May 3, 2013

Article source: http://www.timespressrecorder.com/articles/2013/05/02/news/news59.txt

Collinsville’s Naturescapes celebrates 25 years of growth

It’s not only paperbark maple trees and pink-and-white bleeding heart flowers that have grown at Naturescapes Perennial Farm and Plant Nursery overlooking Collinsville’s Bluff Road.

The plants and a now 25-year-old business have grown out a friendship that’s spanned 50 years.

The business was the brainchild of Collinsville natives Tom Hardesty and Nancee Kruescheck, both 56, who grew up as neighbors, attended the Collinsville schools together, and eventually became business partners.

“We’ve always just wanted to be just a small country nursery,” Hardesty explained April 24. The “small country nursery” has grown to include a garden shop featuring dried herbs hanging from its rafters, gazing globes in the window and art like copper dragonflies by local artists and landscaping work.

The nursery has supplied hard-to-find plants to local gardeners and world-renowned gardens like the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis.

“Everybody deserves beauty in their lives, and I think gardens bring a lot of beauty to our lives,” Hardesty said.

The nursery is open from April 1 to mid-December usually. However, the shop’s annual closing is “when Mother Nature says to.”

For Kruescheck, who worked in a number of nurseries throughout the Metro East before she and Hardesty opened Naturescapes in 1988, it’s not just the beauty of purple cone flowers or her favorite American birch trees that draws her to the soil.

“It’s in my blood,” Kruescheck explained. A child growing up down the road from Hardesty, Kruescheck that she was seldom found indoors.

“I was always in the woods,” she said. “I knew every wildflower from three or four miles around. Playing in the dirt was life.”

While Hardesty went on to get a degree in geography from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Kruescheck received a teaching degree from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. As Hardesty spent the early 1980s working as a bartender at the Old Pekin Restaurant on Collinsville’s Main Street, his former classmate worked in nurseries at a time when few Metro East greenhouses hired women. 

The pair would run into each other at the restaurant, Hardesty said, and eventually began talking about opening a gardening sideline.

“He talked me into,” Kruescheck corrected with a smile. Hardesty agreed.

“Before you knew it, I was suggesting we start our own nursery,” Hardesty continued. “I’m Pinky, she’s the Brain when it comes to the horticultural side,” he said, referencing the cartoon pair of one naive and one ingenious mouse.

What was a side job grew into a full-time business based on Hardesty’s family land at 1674 N. Bluff Road. What is now the garden shop and the stands of Japanese maples and flats of mauve pincushion flowers adjoin the house Hardesty still lives in.

“When we started,” Hardesty said, “nobody in the area was selling perennials.”

The business’s hallmark is selling local, hard-to-find and heirloom perennials that have been tested at Naturescapes by Kruescheck and Hardesty.

“If we don’t like something in our gardens, why would we sell them to you,” he said. The nursery differs from box-store like a Home Depot, he explained, because the emphasis is on personal attention and working with gardeners with all ranges of experience.

“Here, we enjoy questions. We’re proud of our do-it-yourselfers,” he said.

“I don’t like to see a discouraged gardener,” Kruescheck, who teaches horticulture classes locally at Southwestern Illinois College’s Sam Wolf Granite City campus, added.

For Kruescheck, the uniqueness of the shrubs, trees and flowers spread over the nursery grounds can’t be beat.

“It’s not like a manufacturing plant where you just order a new car,” she said. “It has to grow.” 

Article source: http://www.stltoday.com/suburban-journals/illinois/news/collinsville-s-naturescapes-celebrates-years-of-growth/article_98cc1050-2013-5ecd-8a05-8659485737fd.html

What to do in the Garden This Week

Get Daily discounts and offers on sporting events, plays, concerts, museums and other events around town

Article source: http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/house/blog/gardening/2013/05/what_to_do_in_the_garden_this_3.html

SHIRLAND: Nurseryman Brian Ellis offers gardening tips to Hardy Plant Society …

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  • Article source: http://www.derbyshiretimes.co.uk/community/shirland-nurseryman-brian-ellis-offers-gardening-tips-to-hardy-plant-society-members-1-5630210

    May Gardening Tips – Cedar Creek Lake


    May is a month of transition in your garden as cooler weather plants should be replaced with varieties that like warmer temperatures. For example, verbena, petunias, purslane, pentas, vinca and zinnia can all be planted in sunny spots during the month. In shady areas try ferns, begonias, impatiens, nicotiana, hostas and caladiums to provide an interesting mix of color and greenery.

    If you want to attract birds and butterflies, plant milkweed, butterfly bush, red yucca, zinnia, hibiscus, lantana, salvia and vines like trumpet, passion and honeysuckle.

    It’s important to maintain a regular fertilization and pruning schedule for your yard. Now that Spring bloomers, like azaleas, have dropped their flowers, prune and fertilize in order to help buds set for next year.

    St. Augustine, Bermuda and other warm-season turfgrasses can now be planted. Keep new grass moist until well established. If laying sod, use a root stimulator to help the grass develop a healthy root system and don’t fertilize until after the second or third mowing.

    In early May, you can still plant in your vegetable garden summer crops like tomatoes, peppers, okra, corn, cucumber, eggplant, cantaloupe and watermelon. But don’t wait too long as young plants need to be well established before the summer heat hits.

    Caladium bulbs are considered tropicals and are typically planted around Mother’s Day when the soil temperature is warm enough for germination.

    Article source: http://www.cedarcreeklake.com/lake-life--May-Gardening-Tips/639

    Garden walls can come alive with ‘living pictures’

    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows various horizontal and vertical living pictures made with succulent cuttings in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Caitlin Atkinson)

    Photo by Caitlin Atkinson

    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows various horizontal and vertical living pictures made with succulent cuttings in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Caitlin Atkinson)


    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a close-up of a living succulent picture in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Caitlin Atkinson)

    Photo by Caitlin Atkinson

    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a close-up of a living succulent picture in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Caitlin Atkinson)


    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a large living succulent wall in an outdoor area at Flora Grubb Gardens in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Marion Brenner)

    Photo by Marion Brenner

    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a large living succulent wall in an outdoor area at Flora Grubb Gardens in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Marion Brenner)


    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a large living succulent picture hanging outside a bedroom in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space.  (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Marion Brenner)

    Photo by Marion Brenner

    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a large living succulent picture hanging outside a bedroom in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Marion Brenner)


    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a living picture made with cryptanthus and neoregelia bromeliads, rhipsalis cactus, haworthia, hoya, and peperomia in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Caitlin Atkinson)

    Photo by Caitlin Atkinson

    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a living picture made with cryptanthus and neoregelia bromeliads, rhipsalis cactus, haworthia, hoya, and peperomia in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Caitlin Atkinson)


    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a close-up of a living succulent picture dominated by red plants in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space.  (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Caitlin Atkinson)

    Photo by Caitlin Atkinson

    This undated publicity photo courtesy of Flora Grubb Gardens shows a close-up of a living succulent picture dominated by red plants in San Francisco. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/Flora Grubb Gardens, Caitlin Atkinson)


    This undated photo released by FormLA Landscaping shows a living succulent picture created for the courtyard of the 2012 Pasadena Showcase House of Design. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/FormLA Landscaping)

    This undated photo released by FormLA Landscaping shows a living succulent picture created for the courtyard of the 2012 Pasadena Showcase House of Design. Living pictures, cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes, are hot among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space. (AP Photo/FormLA Landscaping)


    Looking for a fresh way to liven up your garden walls? Think plants, not paintings.

    Living pictures — cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes — have caught on among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space.

    “Living pictures composed of succulents have a gorgeous sculptural quality that work surprisingly well in a number of different aesthetics — contemporary, bohemian, Southwestern and more,” says Irene Edwards, executive editor of Lonny home design magazine. “They’re great for urban dwellers with limited space.”

    Living pictures are also nearly maintenance-free (i.e. hard to kill). So even beginners or those with the blackest of thumbs can look like the master gardener of the neighborhood.

    Here’s how you can create your own living succulent picture:

    PICK YOUR STYLE

    There are a few ways you can go.

    For a larger living picture, you can use a wooden pallet, framing out the back like a shadow box. Large, do-it-yourself living wall panels are also for sale online through garden shops like San Francisco’s Flora Grubb Gardens and DIG Gardens based in Santa Cruz, Calif.

    But going big right away can be daunting, and bigger also means heavier, so many newbies like California gardening blogger Sarah Cornwall stick with smaller picture or poster frames.

    Go vintage with an antique frame or finish, or build your own out of local barn wood. Chunky, streamlined frames like the ones Cornwall bought from Ikea give a more modern feel.

    You’ll also need a shadow box cut to fit the back of the frame, and wire mesh or “chicken wire” to fit over the front if you’re going to make your own.

    First, nail or screw the shadow box to the back of the frame. A depth of 2 to 3 inches is ideal. Set the wire mesh inside the frame and secure it with a staple gun, then nail a plywood backing to the back of the shadow box.

    TAKE CUTTINGS

    Almost any succulent can be used for living pictures, though it’s usually best to stick with varieties that stay small, like echeverias and sempervivums, says DIG Gardens co-owner Cara Meyers.

    “It’s fun to use varieties of aeoniums and sedums for their fun colors and textures, but they may need a little more maintenance, as they may start to grow out of the picture more,” she says.

    Cut off small buds of the succulents for cuttings, leaving a stem of at least 1/4-inch long.

    No succulents to snip? You can always buy some at a nursery or trade with other gardeners in your neighborhood.

    “They grow so easily, don’t feel embarrassed knocking on a door to ask for a few cuttings,” Cornwall says.

    Make sure any old bottom leaves are removed, then leave the cuttings on a tray in a cool, shaded area for a few days to form a “scab” on the ends before planting.

    ADD SOIL

    Set the frame mesh-side up on a table and fill with soil, using your hands to push it through the wire mesh openings.

    Be sure to use cactus soil, which is coarser than potting soil for better drainage.

    Some vertical gardeners place a layer of sphagnum moss under and over the soil to hold moisture in when watering.

    FILL IN WITH PLANTS

    Now comes the fun and creative part.

    Lay out the succulent cuttings in the design you want on a flat surface, and poke them into the wire mesh holes in your frame.

    You can start either in one corner or by placing the “focal point” cuttings in first and filling in around them. Waves or rivers of color are popular living-picture designs, although Cape Cod-based landscaper Jason Lambton has gone bolder with spirals of green and purple.

    “We painted the pallet different color stripes to go with the color theme of the back of the house,” says Lambton, host of HGTV’s “Going Yard.” “It looked like a cool piece of living, reclaimed art.”

    Using just one type of succulent is also a simple yet elegant option, says Kirk Aoyagi, co-founder and vice president of FormLA Landscaping.

    “Collages with some draping and some upright plants can create a more dramatic look and feel,” he says.

    CARE AND MAINTENANCE TIPS

    Keep the living picture flat and out of direct sunlight for one to two weeks to allow roots to form along the stems, then begin watering.

    “If you hang it up right away or it rains a lot, that dirt will just pour right out. … I made that mistake once,” Lambton says.

    Mount your living art once the succulents are securely rooted, which can take four to eight weeks depending on climate.

    After that, water every seven to 10 days by removing from the wall and laying it flat. Be sure to let the water drain before hanging your living picture back up, to avoid rotting.

    ———

    Online:

    DIG Gardens: http://diggardensnursery.com

    Flora Grubb Gardens: http://floragrubb.com/idx/index.php

    HGTV: http://www.hgtv.com

    FormLA Landscaping: https://www.formlainc.com

    Article source: http://www.gosanangelo.com/news/2013/may/02/garden-walls-can-come-alive-with-living-pictures/

    The Mountain Gardener: Game adds feature to well-balanced garden – San Lorenzo Valley Press

    When do art and science come together to make your life more beautiful? If you thought of garden design, you’d be right.

    Recently I was treated to a garden tour by fellow designer and good friend Joy Albright-Souza, who has combined her love of art with her degree in science and her passion for the environment to create beautiful spaces for people to enjoy.

    “It was natural to combine the two interests into garden design,” Souza says.

    Last fall, several of her design ideas were featured in a do it yourself book called “Landscape Ideas You Can Use.”

    Understanding garden design is the goal of the book, and it offers specific information on plants and hardscaping options. Fountains, rock gardens and landscaping for play are three of the categories for which Albright-Souza provided examples.

    I have been to Albright-Souza’s garden many times to enjoy a game on the petanque court during a barbeque. Petanque is a game similar to bocce but can be played in a smaller backyard. It’s a great way to get the whole family involved in a game together. I’ve heard Albright-Souza laugh that she’d like to see a petanque court in every yard — it’s that fun.

    Located on the outskirts of Scotts Valley, we visited one of the gardens she designed that features a petanque court. The court replaced a lawn with drainage problems, and recently served as a dance floor for a wedding.

    The property is located on the site of an old quarry, and the granite walls conveniently provide crushed gravel to top-dress the court.

    As we walked around the garden at sunset, the back-lit grasses sparkled like jewels. Locating plants to achieve this effect was no accident. Albright-Souza carefully thought out every aspect, from the deer-resistant plant palette, to the waterfall prominently seen from the dining area inside the house. Even the fenced veggie garden is on a grand scale to protect the owner’s roses and hydrangeas from the deer.

    Some of plants that are not bothered by deer in this garden include the lavender flowering prosanthera or variegated mint bush. Both beautiful and fragrant, this small shrub makes a good hedge or accent plant in deer country.

    Another blooming plant and favorite of mine, Petite Butterfly sweet pea, looked great paired with a helianthemum called Mesa Wine Sun Rose. The pink muhly grasses will bloom in the fall. The new, fresh Japanese blood grass also glowed in the late afternoon sun.

    We talked about the accent boulders in the garden as we walked around. Albright-Souza explained that when the rocks were delivered, she earmarked the largest and most interesting for particular spots.

    One is at the corner of the petanque court and seems to offer an invitation to sit a while. Another flat-topped boulder marks a junction of two walkways and also begs passers-by to try it out. Others were placed reminiscent of Japanese garden design.

    A large dolphin sculpture was moved from a driveway location where few could enjoy it to a spot in the upper garden, where it serves as the focal point in a widening of the cobblestone paver path and can be viewed up close. Placing garden art in prominent places that can be seen from different parts of the garden is part of a good garden design.

    If you are ready to transform your own space, consider some of these ideas. Understanding landscape styles, materials, structures, lighting and plants is part of the fun.

    This spring, get inspired to transform your own garden.

    -Jan Nelson, a landscape designer and California certified nursery professional, will answer questions about gardening in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Email her at janis001@aol.com, or visit www.jannelsonlandscapedesign.com to view past columns and pictures.

    Article source: http://www.pressbanner.com/view/full_story/22433857/article-The-Mountain-Gardener--Game-adds-feature-to-well-balanced-garden?instance=home_community