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Archives for February 6, 2013

Master gardeners elect new board

CROWN POINT | The Lake County Master Gardeners Association Inc. has elected a new board for 2013. With President Sharon Taylor-Raduchel, Vice President Mary Jo Weaver, Secretary  Eileen Truby, Treasurer Judy Kopchik, and board members Kathy Bartley, Sandy Evans, Tim Hojnicki, Peter Kesheimer, Kathy Kick, Julia Laumeyer and Sharalynne Pasztor leading the way, more 300 members direct local gardening events with the Purdue Cooperative Extension Office, 880 E. 99th Court, Suite A.

Leaving the board following dedicated service, Sheree Japchinski, Donnee Smith and Bill Tobin will continue helping others grow in Lake County. By-laws state board members may serve three years prior to replacement, allowing fresh ideas and new worthwhile projects to be introduced.

Meeting the third Friday of each month at the Extension Service office, the board welcomes visitors.

Recently, members attended an Ag Awareness planning meeting for mid-April, when elementary school students discover the importance of farms in Lake County. On Jan. 29, LCMGA members welcomed 29 interns from the fall class for Volunteer Appreciation Day.

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, from 3 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Master Gardener Susan Radovich will give a lecture on “Roses: History and Symbolism” at the monthly winter series open to all visitors, at Tri Town Safety Village, 1350 Eagle Ridge Drive, Schererville. She will describe the origins, facts, and meanings of various types of roses.

On March 11, the seasonal social includes a bus trip to the Chicago Garden Show for members and guests. At the spring banquet in early April, scholarship winners will be announced in the fields of horticulture, landscaping, gardening, and agricultural education. Applications for the scholarship funds are due Feb. 15.

In addition, LCMGA members who have met the minimum qualifications for education and volunteer hours will receive recognition at a banquet at SS. Peter and Paul Church, Merrillville, on April 10. Many members participate in the annual Illiana Pond and Garden Show, April 27-28 at he Lake County Fairgrounds, with MG Kathy Bartley in charge.

On May 18, MG Kathy Kick will direct a plant sale at Tri Town Safety Village, featuring native plants. Finally, on June 22, members have planned a garden walk in Dyer, Schererville, and St. John.

Call Diana Cook in the Extension Office at (219) 755-3240.

 

Article source: http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/lake/crown-point/master-gardeners-elect-new-board/article_66fd35e8-0dc9-523e-9202-aa7a204dd5d3.html

Planners make first comments about LDR – Daily News


Posted: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 12:00 am
|


Updated: 11:48 pm, Tue Feb 5, 2013.


Planners make first comments about LDR

By JOHN WAYNE FERGUSON

galvestondailynews.com

GALVESTON — For the past three weeks, the Galveston planning commission has largely stayed away from controversial issues during its review of the city’s new land development regulations.


That changed Tuesday when the commission broached the topic of height and density rules for the first time. 

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Wednesday, February 6, 2013 12:00 am.

Updated: 11:48 pm.

Article source: http://www.galvestondailynews.com/news/local_news/article_af96db46-7020-11e2-b0eb-001a4bcf6878.html

Pinterest comes to UCR

4th year student Ruchi Patel start to make her knot keychain at UCR's Pinterest event

4th year student Ruchi Patel start to make her knot keychain at UCR’s Pinterest event

Looking for a new do-it-yourself project to start this week? First, check out the thousands of DIY boards found on Pinterest. It’s a social networking site that takes the concept of pinning your interests to a virtual level. The content and categorization of users’ pinboards are totally up to the individual. With the ability to follow any number of boards on an increasingly wide range of topics, users have access to thousands of DIY arts and crafts ideas, landscaping photos, recipes and more. The topics are virtually endless.
Pinterest is great for online interaction, but why not bring some of the DIY ideas to life? On Tuesday, Jan. 29 and Jan. 31 the Student Wellness Partners hosted two arts and crafts events featuring some fun and easy ideas found on Pinterest. From 3-5 p.m. in HUB 248, free crafts materials were laid out for students to enjoy. Among some of the activities were making scarves, armbands and bookmarkers.
With a stressful midterm season ahead, students were welcomed to enjoy time away from their hectic schedules and find some peace of mind in a creative and relaxed atmosphere. Both of these events were a part of The Well’s midterm stress relief series aimed at giving students a well-deserved break during the chaos of test time. The student volunteers hosting the event included Ingrid Arteaga, who showed participants how to create friendship bracelets and properly cut scarves out of shirts, an idea found on Pinterest. As the events carried on and the evening progressed, students arrived before and after classes to listen to soft music and utilize the art supplies provided.

 

Arteaga commented on the site, saying, “On Pinterest, you can connect with people and ideas from different places, most you’ve never met before.” Not only is Pinterest good for providing access to crafty ideas, but also for connecting your interests and identifying with other people from any number of creative backgrounds. Participant Christina Tjandra, who is also a user of the site, appreciates it for its approach. “I like how Pinterest isn’t about who you’re following, but about your own interests,” said Tjandra.
Until August of last year, the site had an air of exclusivity, when users were only able to join the site through request or invitation by a current user. Pinterest was conceptualized by Ben Silbermann in 2009 and launched in March of 2010. Following this change, Pinterest made its debut on Android and IPad devices, proving the company to be a fighting contender in the world of image-based networking.

 

This particular mode of networking has become popular with sites and apps like Tumblr and Instagram. Similar to these examples, Pinterest allows their users to upload personal images or ideas and share them with their followers. What makes the site unique is that users can also pin images or blog posts from an internet site using the “Pin It” tab installed after sign-up. From beauty and fashion to cooking and crafts, Pinterest is a hub for anyone to share their ideas on their own terms. Sites like Pinterest and similarly, Instagram or Tumblr, make it easy for users to create unique spheres of interest by digitally interacting with others.
The series of Pinterest events were an easy way to bring a specific digital interaction to life. Pinterest and sites like it are great for creative expression, boredom, laughs and even news. However, reblogging and repinning are no replacement for the real thing. When discussing the topic of users on image-based networking site, Tjandra said, “You can’t use them if you don’t have self-control.”Organizations like The Well are constantly finding ways to bring students together through relevant and creative events.

 

1st year student Andy Ye is creating his Pintrest art

1st year student Andy Ye is creating his Pintrest art

 

Article source: http://www.highlandernews.org/7263/pinterest-comes-to-ucr/

Gardening news and notes: Rapper grows up; planting patios in India; plants …


tirapper.JPG

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Singer T.I., seen here performing at the Super Bowl, continues his efforts to put his past behind him.



 

SINGER GETS GARDENING TIPS: Rapper T.I. continued his efforts to clean up his troubled past as he and his three kids took lessons on how to garden from Taja Sevelle, a singer and founder of Urban Farming. Sevelle started the nonprofit organization in 2005. The very long, detailed mission can be read on the organization’s website. T.I. was the star of the reality TV show “Road To Redemption.” His newest is “T.I. and Tiny: The Family Hustle.”

CUTTING DOWN ON CONCRETE: Bangalore’s Koramangala residents are turning their terraces and balconies into gardens, a trend that follows the upward curve of professional landscaping companies in India. The story reports: “Homemakers, working women and botany enthusiasts alike have joined hands into making private terraces and balconies greener. Not only are they making it palatable to the eye, but, they are also using the space to source their kitchen requirements.”

PLANTS PURIFY: A recent study by the Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture at Washington State University, reinforces past research that indoor plants help provide a healthier environment. The findings: “Plants in a windowless workplace was shown to help increase employee productivity and attentiveness while at the same time reducing stress.”

— Kym Pokorny

Article source: http://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/2013/02/gardening_news_and_notes_rappe.html

Spring Comes Alive at I-X Home & Garden Show: Take A Peek

 

More than 650 exhibitors are at this year’s Great Big Home Garden Show at the I-X Center.

The 2013 show also features a Garden Showcase in the South Hall which includes elaborately landscaped exhibits inspired by landmarks, such as Cedar Point, Central Park, Augusta National Golf Club, Wrigley’s Field and Napa Valley.

Also featured is a fully constructed, 4,000-square-foot Idea Home sponsored by Sherwin-Williams and Cleveland Magazine and built by Perrino Builders.

The show, which runs through Feb. 10 includes some new additions as well as some old favorites. Take a look through our slideshow to see some of the attractions.

New Features and Attractions:

• The fully constructed, 2,000-square-foot Dream Basement built by Chagrin Falls-based Custom Remodeling and Design.

• Fine dining at the Cambria Bistro, a full-service, white-tablecloth restaurant.

 “The Good Life” is the theme of the daily cooking sessions presented by local chefs and instructors of the Loretta Paganini School of Cooking.

Returning Favorites from 2012:

• The Garden Showcase, sponsored by WKYC, WDOK and WQAL, and located in the South Hall. 

• The Celebrity Designer Rooms will be custom-designed by a Northeast Ohio design business or exhibitor with the help of a local radio or television personality. 

• Belgard Hardscapes Inc. will feature outdoor living spaces created by two of the area’s premier landscapers – Rock Bottom Lawn Landscaping and Friberg Landscaping Construction, LLC.

• At The Petitti Gardening Stage, daily gardening seminars on landscape design, flora and furnishing outdoor rooms will be held by Northeast Ohio landscape experts. 

• The Plant Sale begins after the show closes on Feb. 10 at 6:30 p.m. Get great deals on the products and plant material on display in the gardens just in time for spring.

• Kids can have fun in Playground World’s KidsZone, which features slides, swings, basketball hoops and the world’s safest, fully-enclosed SpringfreeTM Trampoline. 

Home Improvement and Culinary Celebrities:

• The show will also feature Ohio native Chris Crary, a season nine participant and fan favorite from Bravo’s popular television series Top Chef, on Feb. 9.

• Matt Fish, owner and chef of Melt Bar and Grilled will also present on The Main Stage Feb. 8, 9 and 10.

Article source: http://fairlawn-bath.patch.com/articles/spring-comes-alive-at-i-x-home-garden-show-take-a-peek-658f8598

Minnesota author pens book on edible landscaping for northern gardeners




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      Some gardens are workhorses, dedicated to growing food, while others are supermodels, all about adding beauty. But more of today’s gardens are multi-taskers, expected to do both.

      Author Emily Tepe (“The Edible Landscape,” $24.95, Voyageur Press) doesn’t accept the old notion that food-producing plants should be segregated in their own plot. She advocates combining them freely with ornamentals to add color, texture and visual interest to beds and containers. “I believe a yard can be both beautiful and productive,” she writes.

      Tepe’s handiwork was on public display for several growing seasons on the St. Paul campus of the University of Minnesota, where she designed an edible landscape demonstration garden while she was a graduate student and fruit researcher. (Another student took over the garden last year.) Agriculture is a second career for Tepe, who spent a decade working in theater design before a garden epiphany convinced her she wanted to spend more time outdoors.

      Tepe, a research associate with the university’s Department of Horticultural Science, now lives in Wyoming most of the year, but she’ll be returning to the Twin Cities this month for a series of seminars and book-signings.

      Q: Are you surprised at the way edible landscaping has taken off?

      A: I am a little bit. The Victory Garden thing is coming back. It goes along with local food, farmers markets, CSAs — I think the Obama White House garden has been an influence, and books like Michael Pollan’s “The Omnivore’s Dilemma.” People are talking more about pesticides, and thinking, “I should just do this myself, then I don’t need to be worried about it.” Edible landscaping is as local as local can be. Whatever is sending people into their gardens is good.

       

      Q: Why did you decide to write a book?

      A: I started a blog (www.artichokesandzinnias.com) to share resources. The acquisitions editor at Voyageur Press contacted me in summer 2010 and asked if I was interested in writing a book. I hadn’t thought about it, but I enjoy writing about edible landscaping and thought it could be a great opportunity.

       

      Q: What did you think was missing from other books on the topic?

      A: There are a lot of books but few focused on northern climates. We have our own set of challenges. I wanted to address those while being inspiring to people everywhere.

       

      Q: What makes growing edibles especially challenging up here?

      A: The shortness of the season means having to think ahead and get things started inside. Some of the perennials we have to work a little harder to protect. With fruit plants, it’s important to choose the right varieties that are hardy here. And placement is important. We have to create protected spaces. Even for herbs — they might say they’re hardy, but if you don’t have good snow cover, they might not make it.

       

      Q: What are your favorite edible plants for northern gardeners?

      A: I’m strangely enamored of Swiss chard. It’s such an easy plant to grow and so pretty. It’s my favorite. You can’t really mess it up. I’ve only seen it bolt once in my life. I also like other greens — kale and lettuces. You can stick them in here and there, and they play off a lot of ornamentals. They seem to look good so easily. Then there’s tomatoes. Everyone loves to have them, but it takes thought and creativity to have them look nice.


      • related content

      • “The Edible Landscape,” by Emily Tepe

      • EDIBLE LANDSCAPING

        What: Seminars and book-signings featuring Emily Tepe, author of “The Edible Landscape.”

        Where and when: 1 p.m. Feb. 16, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum; 10 a.m. Feb. 23, Gertens, Inver Grove Heights; 11 a.m. March 2, Cooks of Crocus Hill, Stillwater; 2:15 p.m. March 9, East Metro Spring Fling, Woodbury; 3 p.m. March 10, Cooks of Crocus Hill, St. Paul; 12:45 and 2:15 p.m. March 16, “Burst Into Spring,” Isanti County Master Gardeners conference, Cambridge, Minn.

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      Gardening tips for February – Daily News


      Posted: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 12:00 am


      Gardening tips for February

      BY DR. WILLIAM JOHNSON

      galvestondailynews.com

      Regardless your political persuasion, presidential inaugurations — whether first term or second term — give rise to a sense of renewal. 


      Over the next few weeks, gardeners will observe the annual renewal of landscapes as trees and shrubs produce a new crop of green leaves and an array of colorful flowers to lift our spirits.

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      Article source: http://www.galvestondailynews.com/lifestyle/leisure/article_0eb09166-7022-11e2-bfb3-001a4bcf6878.html

      Inspirational gardening books

      IF you’re still planning what to grow in your garden this year, there’s a plethora of new books out in the spring to provide inspiration and guidance. Hannah Stephenson leafs through some of the best

      If you’re still scratching your head as to what to do with your garden this year, whether trying veg in pots for the first time, creating a wildflower meadow or completely re-landscaping your outdoor space, there are new books coming out which should provide you with plenty of ideas.

      Here are just a few of the many gardening titles on offer this year:

      :: The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart (Timber Press, £14.99, May 2): This intoxicating and eclectic new book on the hidden botany behind your favourite booze would make a fabulous gift for gardeners who enjoy a tipple. The quirky guide explains the chemistry and botanical history of more than 150 species, showing how they form the bases of our favourite cocktails and also offers 50 drink recipes.

      :: Christine Walkden’s No-Nonsense Container Gardening (Simon Schuster, £20, February 28): She may now be a regular on The One Show and Radio 4’s Question Time, but Christine Walkden is a gardener first and a presenter second. In her typical down-to-earth style, she shows you how to recycle tin cans, fruit crates and baskets and turn them into portable growing containers, grow your own lunch in a tub with dwarf varieties and cultivate abundant flowers for cutting and fragrance. Well illustrated and with tips from personal experience, this book will suit the fairly new gardener looking for new ideas.

      :: Royal Horticultural Society Grow Your Own Crops In Pots by Kay Maguire (Mitchell Beazley, £16.99, available now): As growing your own fruit and veg continues to gain popularity, this book is one for people who perhaps don’t have room for a vegetable plot or who simply want to have a go at growing produce in pots on the patio, close to the kitchen. Featuring everything from bags of potatoes to grapes on the vine, and delicious combinations such as tomato with basil, the book guides the reader through techniques and tips, as well as sound advice for growing each type of fruit and veg.

      :: A Book Of Garden Wisdom by Jenny Hendy (Lorenz Books, £5.99, May 31): If you like to hark to days gone by and restore some traditional methods of gardening on your plot, this delightful book of folklore, organic gardening, hints and tips featuring traditional techniques for sowing, planting and harvesting, as well as age-old methods for controlling pests and diseases, feeding the soil and caring for tools, should fit the bill.

      :: RHS Chelsea Flower Show: A Centenary Celebration by Brent Elliott (Frances Lincoln, £25, April 4): Chelsea Flower Show’s centenary couldn’t go without a commemorative book and this offering, by the RHS historian Brent Elliott, explores how the show evolved, how it has formed part of the social calendar and how it has reflected and shaped tastes in garden design and planting over the years. There are short pieces by significant nurserymen and nurserywomen, designers, organisers, visitors and patrons describing what Chelsea means to them, with chapters on the early shows, shows between the wars and decade by decade to the present day. It’s illustrated with images mainly drawn from the RHS Lindley Library archives, many of which are published here for the first time.

      :: Abundance: How To Store And Preserve Your Garden Produce by Alys Fowler (Kyle Books, £16.99, June 1): If you’re growing fruit and veg then you may want to learn how to preserve it. Look no further than this guide from the former Gardeners’ World presenter, who covers everything from drying and pickling to cold stores and fermenting.

      :: Wild Flowers by Carol Klein (BBC Books, £20, February 28): Master plantswoman and Gardeners’ World presenter Carol Klein celebrates the most exquisite flora growing wild in our woodlands, hedgerows, meadows and moors in this book and then returns to her own garden to see their cultivated cousins. This tie-in book sees Klein delving into the story of more than 30 of her favourite wild flowers, and sharing her practical expertise and suggestions on how to help their cultivated equivalents thrive.

      :: The Rurbanite by Alex Mitchell (Kyle Books, £16.99, March 1): Do you live in the city but dream of keeping chickens? Do you look at derelict patches of ground on your way to work and see their potential as vegetable patches? If so, you’re a rurbanite. You have a passion for the countryside but no intention of leaving the city. Don’t worry, you’re not alone. You’re part of a growing band of people who want the best of both worlds. The author shares her passion, practical projects and incredible stories from seed bombers, rooftop beekeepers, guerrilla gardeners and urban farmers to inspire you to be in touch with your green side and change the cityscape for the better.

      :: Gardening In Pyjamas: Horticultural Enlightenment For Obsessive Dawn Raiders by Helen Yemm (Simon Schuster, £12.99, April 11): If you find yourself padding about your plot in your nightclothes without really knowing what to do, this book will provide you with all the essential facts to nurture your growing passion. The Daily Telegraph’s much-loved columnist Helen Yemm strikes a happy balance between giving you enough information to get you going but not so much that it scares you or puts you off entirely. She dispenses invaluable advice, minus the mumbo jumbo, with refreshing humour and a clear understanding of her theme.

      Article source: http://www.hertfordshiremercury.co.uk/Homes-and-Gardens/Gardening/Inspirational-gardening-books-05022013.htm

      Why it’s worth collecting gardening literature

      Park says plant-hunting is still popular. First editions of many of legendary
      plantsman Frank Kingdon Ward titles seem to maintain their prices, though
      the purple prose of Reginald Farrer is less popular than it was. And
      collecting the complete works of certain gardener/authors can still be
      profitable – modern authors such as Helen Dillon and Marylyn Abbott
      frequently rise in value once their works are out of print.

      Park is confident pre-20th-century gardening literature will always appreciate
      in value, but later works are less certain investments. But he has a couple
      of tips: hold on to old books (or guidebooks) on gardens that are still open
      today – it is always interesting to compare old with new. Another central
      tenet of Park’s is this: “The criteria I always use here is collect those
      who actually garden, rather than just write about it. You can usually tell
      if the hand that picks up the pen has soil under the nail.”

      Collectable tips

      Don’t throw out early seed catalogues

      Book collectors will disapprove, but you can split books and frame the prints.
      Who knows, they may make more money on the wall

      See abebooks.co.uk
      for prices

      Article source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/gardeningadvice/9839654/Why-its-worth-collecting-gardening-literature.html